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GreatSchools Rating

Harrison Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 701 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted April 15, 2013

Teachers are responsive to emails. That's a positive, but it can't outweigh the negatives in my opinion. Course language and a dress code that isn't often enough enforced isn't something my children should be forced to be around on a daily basis. I've seen shorts that don't completely cover rear ends there. The decision to pull out one of my children wasn't lightly taken, but it wasn't a difficult one. I will be looking into a transfer request for my other student since they need the special education, otherwise I'd likely be pulling them all out. I think the majority of your student's success will be on which teacher they get. But even so, the culture at the school doesn't seem to be one of high standards.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 21, 2010

My daughter went to Harrison several years ago and she had some great teachers!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 1, 2009

My son's attended this school for four years and with the exception of one teacher we didn't quite see eye-to-eye with our experiences with Harrison have been wonderful. Everyone from the office staff to the Principal has treated us and our son with care and the utmost respect. Keep it up Tigers!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 18, 2008

I just relocated from the Los Angeles area. I understand that some parents aren't happy with the school system or Harrison, however I believe that this is a challenge for all involved. We, as parents, can not expect the school system to be solely responsible for the education of our children. If you see something you don't like then volunteer. Actively participate so that we can change things together for a more positive learning experience. I understand that its not always possibly to volunteer. I understand that single parents don't always have this luxury. I'm a single mother and I take my daughter's education seriously. She's learning. Harrison isn't perfect however I believe that the staff and administration are doing their best. And the school is doing a great job in dealing with all of the budget cuts.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2007

My daughter is a 4th grader and has attended Harrison since kindergarten. Each year we've been very pleased. Her teachers have been very accessable for any and all questions or concerns. Our principal is very visible and involved. Our monthly family nights are fun and creative. I'm a full time working mother and while I can't be as involved with the school as I would like, I'm confident she is being well educated and cared for by the Harrison staff. Go, Super Tigers!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2007

My Son is in the 4th Grade at Harrison we moved here from the LA school Dis. He went from hating school to loving it. He loves his teacher and for once he actually wants to learn. Thanks a Bunch Ms.D
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2006

We are going on our 3rd year at Harrison and I can't say enough about the teachers especially in this day and age of public schools. We have been at every end - my son is basic in the beginning of the year and proficient by the end. He has encountered bullies and had the split grade classroom. The school is operating to the best of their ability and as a parent you have to put into a school what you want to get out of it. I am a full time working mom and each year when I volunteer in the classrooms it is the same handful of parents helping. As parents we need to realize how overcrowded, financially strapped, and the political correctness the schools are trying to function with. My son loves Harrison and we look forward to sending our younger son next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2006

I think some of the teachers allow themselves to be tested by the students(kids want to see how much they can get away with), before doing anything. I have see it over and over again, not just with my child but with others. Some of the teachers stop it right away others wait till its out of hand and then expect the parents to fix it. Why don't the teachers notify the parents right away? I really like the school but have been seeing changes I don't agree with or like.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 11, 2006

One subject that is not addressed here is the bullying at harrison. When the principal and asst. Principal keep getting the same complaints about the same bulliers you think they would put and end to it but it seems to just be ignored . Use your words, walk away. That is great if it really worked but it does not with these certain bullies. No wonder more parents are homeschooling now! and I agree this school is just mostly concerned with high test scores. I used to volunteer not anymore!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2006

My child has been successful at this school and I plan on keeping him there for through fifth grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2006

Harrison Elementary allows for a poor education by insisting upon multiple grades in a single classroom. I have a second grade student who is recieving the very same education that he completed last year. The school alone is not to blame; however, the Riverside School Board will is equally un responsive.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2005

Harrison focuses so much of their attention on the kids who do well (so as to insure funding through high test scores)that the kids who are seriously struggling fall through the cracks. I have two children at Harrison. One who helps to keep their test scores high and one who struggles and simply gets pushed further and further behind because of this type of thinking. With 35+ students and two grade levels in one classroom the teachers are spread too thin to provide her with the help she needs. What ever happened to one on one help and special classes for kids like this? At Harrison they don't exist! So if your child is exceptionaly bright, the excellerated curriculum and test-focused mind set of Harrison could be just right for you. If you have an academically normal,or especially academically challenged child, please stear clear. They don't have time for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

806

Change from
2012 to 2013

-22

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

806

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-22

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

6 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
58%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
51%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
58%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

76 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

97 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
60%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

100 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students51%
Females51%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learner30%
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate29%
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)52%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students59%
Females51%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner41%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate42%
Parent education - high school graduate64%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate57%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students30%
Females36%
Males27%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)44%
Economically disadvantaged24%
Non-economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disability27%
Students with no reported disability31%
English learner17%
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented69%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate0%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduate29%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females72%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disability60%
Students with no reported disability77%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate57%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)80%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students53%
Females58%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate44%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)52%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students68%
Females71%
Males66%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate63%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students61%
Females69%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino51%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate69%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students66%
Females79%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learner55%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate63%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)65%
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students59%
Females67%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate56%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females60%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learner23%
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate33%
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduate58%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students51%
Females51%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only53%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate25%
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 55% 51%
White 32% 27%
Black 6% 7%
Asian 4% 11%
Two or more races 3% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 56%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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2901 Harrison Street
Riverside, CA 92503
Phone: (951) 352-6712

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