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GreatSchools Rating

Phoebe A. Hearst Elementary School

Public | 1-6

 
 

Living in Sacramento

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $310,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,110.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 9 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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60 reviews of this school


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Posted May 22, 2014

This is a wonderful school. When you are able to affort a private education but choose to go through a public school, you have a higher level of scrutiny. My husband and I have been very happy about this school. It is quite structured, however. Those parents who want their kids to be treated 'special', may be quite disappointed because every kid is treated the same. That is what struck me as a positive aspect of this school. There is not too much time allowed for non-academic exploration, but there are afterschool venues that are provided for a nominal fee and fill the gap. We have two children and are unsure what a fit it will be for our second one who is not as focused as the first, but I will say that the level of parental involvement in the school, as well as the quality of the teachers, has impressed us both that we will recommend this school wholeheartely. A word of caution though: A lot of Tiger Moms; so do not be surprised. This is not a laid back touchy-feely environment. If that is what you are looking for, this is not the right school for you...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2014

My daughter enrolled at Phoebe Hearst mid year of 1st grade. Her teacher Ms. Auge is AMAZING! She really helped Madison acclimate to classroom and Madison was in full pace with her peers by 3rd quarter. The staff, principal, and teachers are truly a community. Not to mention the support that the fellow parents provide is unmeasured. I would highly recommend this school to any parents that values their child's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2013

Phoebe Hearst has been a great fit for our diverse(2 inter-racial Dads with a bi-racial son) family. Aside from academics being a priority, we equally impressed knowing that the school was a big advocate and supporter of anti-bullying initiatives. Our son was one of the first Kindergarten classes in 2012 and he loved it. He is now in the first grade and loves it too. The Principal and school staff are very attentive and demonstrate genuine concern for the students. Parents are very involved as well which helps create a welcoming and supportive environment for everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2013

Awesome school! Our son transferred to Phoebe Hearst (2nd grade) from a private school. Our worries were quickly put to rest when we found that parents are very involved in school activities and their students education. As a whole, the kids and their parents are respectful and considerate. The principal and teachers do a great job - especially considering the super high student:teacher ratio. Kids are eager to go to school and the environment encourages learning. Test scores are really good but this can be explained easily. Phoebe Hearst is a GATE feeder school so many of the top students in reading, math and science go to this school. There are a lot of ex-private school families. Most of the parents we talk to are really happy with PH. That said, each child has different needs and the classroom environment is largely influenced by the teacher, students, parents and overall tone set by the principal. The high student:teacher ratio means that parents have to really engage with their kids to make up for any lack of personalized attention that the teachers cannot provide. Looking forward to a great 3rd grade experience this school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2013

PH is a good school and scores well in all the standardized tests; however, this shouldn't come to anyone's surprise mainly because PH is a non-neighborhood schools most of the kids entering kindergarten are assessed prior to the opportunity of participating in the lottery. This school can handpick individual students which isn't a good practice in any public school system. Other schools do not have that luxury and no school should be allowed to conduct any kind of assessment as this promotes an imbalance in education opportunity.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 20, 2013

You get what you and your child put into this school. Yes, the teachers are strict and have high expectations. However, some parents expect the teachers to do all the work during school hours but does not provide any support after school. Don't blame the educational system if you're not helping your child by complementing the day's lessons.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2013

I cant see what everything about school is so great. as more students are joining the teachers cant prioritize their students. they are focused on high scores and good grades yet cant help them. its sad to see Phoebe becoming so arrogant and all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2013

I switched my 3 children to this school, I have to say I'm very happy with all 3 teachers and the school in general. There is a lot of parent envolvement which is great. There are high expectations and it's "cool" to be smart at PH.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2013

In a climate of a public schooling crisis, I feel Phoebe Hearst is rising to the challenges and continues to provide high academic expectations for all students. As a parent of a child in both a "GATE" class and "non-GATE" class, I see equal expectations of both children. There is no doubt that this year has brought big changes in the forms of bigger class sizes and "new" teachers (aka experienced teachers at a new campus). However, this is a change that all schools in our district have faced. In looking at a couple negative reviews of Phoebe from this year, I feel compeled to remind people that we must not place blame on our local schools for large class sizes and experienced educators teaching grades they have not taught before; as these changes are district, state, and union mandated. The principal's leadership at Phoebe is strong and for those that are willing to be part of a solution, there is a solution to be had for most problems. It's no secret that positive behavior and academic rigor are basic expectations at Phoebe, and that may not be for everyone; but if you want peace of mind that high expectations will be held for your child's public education, this is your school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2013

Everyone makes a big deal about Phoebe being the "top" school, but we don't see what all the hype is about. I would suggest parents sit and observe a few classes in action before putting their child here (don't just do the principal guided tour). The teachers are "handed" gifted students but some have become complacent and quite arrogant. There aren't any awards or kudos given to the kids for good attendance, improving academically or anything. They use negative reinforcement constantly by taking away recess. We can't understand why they don't use any positive reinforcement techniques to engage and reward the children. In addition, now that the lower grades are packed with 30 kids per classroom, my child's teacher is very overwhelmed and it's negatively impacting the students. Many of the parents feel that the principal needs to ease up on the constant "PR" and focus more on staff development INSIDE the classrooms. I would not recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2012

We are so glad our little one is attending kindergarten at Phoebe Hearst. Even though, he transitioned from being in a preschool class with just 14 kids to a typical 30 student classroom, he is learning and having a great time. And teacher manages to encourage all the children to thrive even if some of them are at different levels. I'm most impressed with the parent involvement and how it is encouraged. I'm having a ball helping at my son's classroom and knowing that every effort we as parents do to support the school is in our little one's best interest.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2012

The transition to Phoebe has been less than favorable for our family. A small group of older kids have bullied our child, physically and verbally. We have received very little assistance from the staff regarding resolving or preventing bullying. At my child's last school, we NEVER had any issues with bullies or unresponsive staff. This school seems to focus so much on academics and high test scores that they seem to have forgotten how the well being of children is equally important in the overall school experience. Test scores aren't everything and seeing my child so unhappy at this school has been an awful experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2012

I was really worried at first because of the high student:teacher ratio at the public schools and I was going to enroll my daughter at one of the private schools in East Sacramento. But so far I've been very happy with the experience at this school. My daughter's teacher is great and I hear from the other parents of kids in the older grades that the academic curriculum is bar none. I think we made the right choice. My daughter is having fun and the parents I've been so far are really great. The school is very welcoming and very open to having me around as much as possible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2012

What a find this school is. I have two kids in this school. One is in the 4th grade GATE class and I have a new younger son in kindergarten. Amazing teachers. Parent involvement is welcome by the principal and the teachers. This is an amazing environment for kids to be in and I'm glad this school is in my neighborhood, even though it's not really a neighborhood school. One word for this school and its teachers: AWESOME!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2012

I have a son in 3rd grade and my other son started kindergarten this year. Amazing difference with our experience at this school vs our experience with my other son's kindergarten year. The academics is really more challenging at this school and less trivial (which is what my other son got at his other kindergarten school). Don't get me wrong. I don't believe it's necessary for kindergarteners from the beginning start off gangbuster with academics, but it's kind of nice for my second son to start reading more substantially and doing more real academic stuff. It makes me feel like he's really learning something early on. Just my two cents. Great school, especially if your child is academically gifted.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2012

The last post is interesting because I've had the opposite experience with the addition of Kindergarten at Phoebe Hearst. With all that goes into starting a brand new program and the currnet budget situation SCUSD schools are in, I think the program is phenomenal. No kindergarten in SCUSD has any less children, it's a district cap at 31. Also, Phoebe Hearst has parents volunteering on a regular basis to support the learning environment. Surprisingly, the PTO has supported art lessons weekly for enrichment for the new Kindergartners. My child's teacher shared with me that she is working with the 1st grade team to be sure that the Kinders are totally ready for Phoebe Hearst's rigirous 1st grade program. The new kinder rooms are bright and clean, and the teachers are all welcoming. My child loves school, and the facility is meeting our needs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2012

I have a daughter in the kindergarten class and I was really nervous at first because I wasn't sure what to expect. I know that I'm a pretty hands on parent and I didn't know if the teachers would give me hassle for that but to my surprise, my daughter's teacher reassured and made me feel so much better. She has a great time at school and she's met a lot of new friends who happen to be in the neighborhood too. She's learning a lot and loves school and loves to read with me. I could have had her go to the private schools in town with more personal attention but I'm glad my wife and decided to enroll our daughter at Phoebe Hearst. The teacher is amazing, the principal is on top of everything and the families are wonderful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2012

After jumping through many hoops, my child is in kindergarten here and I don't understand what the big deal is with this school. First off, the class size is 31 (one teacher, no aide) which is quite large. Secondly, although having been a teacher for 20+ years, his teacher has never taught this age and has been clearly stressed to the limit from day one. She has no patience and gets upset at the slightest thing without realizing that if she had even a bit of control over the class, she could reign this in and be much happier. The kids aren't even allowed to ask questions during class! Furthermore, there are three kindergarten classes and hers is the only one who doesn't allow the children to work in the school garden (too messy) or do anything outside the mandated curriculum. I am disappointed that we came here with such high expectations only to have a five year old who used to love school now dread leaving the house every day. To make matters worse, she's catering to the lowest common denominator and the lesson plan is for a three year old at best. I know it's public school, but this is ridiculous.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2012

This is a great school with an excellent principal who is realistic (given the budget) and supports the kids and teachers. In 2012 this school will also have Kindergarten classes. The parents and kids make this school a great place. The one drawback is an excess of busy homework that seems a bit unnecessary. The kids are expected to be at or above grade level and the GATE program allows the teachers to repeat the material less often. My son loves this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2011

My daughter has just finished first grade and I'm astonished at the progress that she had made. This is the ideal school for anyone that wants their children to achieve academically and be in a safe environment. Homework is at least one hour a day for first grade, and the school does enforce a strict uniform code and on-campus rules. Students and parents though are rewarded with meaningful teaching, excellent quality extra curricular activities and a school run efficiently and effectively.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

940

Change from
2012 to 2013

+7

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

940

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+7

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
87%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
85%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students87%
Females91%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino74%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented97%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to state71%

Math

All Students92%
Females92%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino83%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantaged87%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to state76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Females63%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asian82%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state77%

Math

All Students83%
Females73%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged79%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students88%
Females89%
Males87%
African American92%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino82%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantaged84%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to state88%

Math

All Students97%
Females94%
Males100%
African American100%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino95%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantaged96%
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to state95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students91%
Females93%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino80%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate100%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state95%

Math

All Students86%
Females88%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate91%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state89%

Science

All Students84%
Females83%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate82%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females87%
Males75%
African American85%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented98%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate91%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)74%
Parent education - college graduate70%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to state84%

Math

All Students81%
Females89%
Males73%
African American77%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino74%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged74%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate91%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)89%
Parent education - college graduate60%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to state80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 51%
Hispanic 21%
Asian 10%
Two or more races 7%
Black 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 24%N/AN/A
English language learners 3%N/AN/A

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1410 60th Street
Sacramento, CA 95819
Phone: (916) 277-6690

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