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GreatSchools Rating

Thomas Edison Elementary School

Public | K-7

 

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Living in Sacramento

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $240,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,090.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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18 reviews of this school


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Posted April 21, 2014

My son Is in 6th grade an gos to Thomas Edison School, The teachers an staff are very helpful an intune with my chid in teaching him on the right path so hes able to grow into a fine student ive found they go the extra mile in getting them ready for the yrs to come in higher grades I feel they truly care about each child as to whole class
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2013

I am not happy with this school. My children have been here for the last 6 years and I feel like there is so much lacking. I agree there is minimal parent involvement. I also feel like the admin is horrible. I do not feel like principal/vp are not engaged at all w/ parents. I was at a meeting and the vp did not even introduce herself to me and seemed irritated to be there. There are SO many behavior problems, horrible test scores AND I feel like the parents/children who are getting the most involvement and help are the dual immersion classes. My children were at the school before it was a language insitute and I feel like they do not get the focus that the dual immersion classes do. I feel like my children's classes lack because there is only 1 english speaking class per grade. Not so for the dual immersion so they are getting a more hands on and quality education. Bottom line is i feel my children are falling throught the cracks and I am ready to pull them out and write a letter to the school board. Thoams Edison needs some serious help and I feel it needs to start with the Principal and VP.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

The school has a lot of potentials but the school environment is very chaotic and disorganized. We were not told where to meet and what teacher was assigned to our child on the first day of school. Back to school night didn't happen until 3 week after school started and parents were not informed until couple days before. There was no homework for the first 3 weeks of school. There seems to be no one in charge at all at this school. There is loud hip-hop music blasting away when kids are waiting to go to class. The school janitor with tattoos covering his arms and legs also doubles up to watch kids as young as 4 years old in the cafeteria. School yard supervision consists of adults screaming and yelling at kids. The principal doesn't seem to try to connect with parents and kids. His is only seen running from meeting to meeting and holding up the stop sign in the parking lot. My child looks terrified when I drop him off every morning and I am about to pull him out and put him in a better school. He said he is more afraid of the adults there than the kids. This school is no place for any kid to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2012

Today is the first day of school (8-16-2012) for my son. While I have no review to submit; I'm encouraged to hear that many parents remarks here give me hope and leave me encouraged. I think we can all work together to help our children do well and of course that starts with a "little we time" with them at home. I look forward to great news in the coming school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2012

My son is in dual immersion Kinder. We moved mid-year from Willow Glen Elementary in San Jose CA. where he was in the dual immersion kinder The class sizes are smaller, the teachers and staff care. My son has learned so much here in a very short time. On the other hand, there is a lack of parent involvement here, which is the biggest problem I see. The PTA is not as proactive as WGE. There seems to be more behavior problems with children, which I feel more parent involvement would mitigate. I see kids whose parents pack them a roll of Oreo cookies for lunch and other junk food, these are children who need brain food, I have been shocked every time that I have gone into the lunch room. There is no recycling program, the garden is supposed to be starting up this month, late due to funding. Funding is another issue at this school, there seems to be funding problems everywhere you turn here. At WGE, the PTA was great about filling in all of those gaps. Where as WGE lacked for nothing, Thomas Edison lacks much. I hope to see more parent involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2012

My daughter's attending the early kinder program and is doing great! The after school care is very inexpensive, yet full of activities, cooking, sports teams, etc. The principal is very enthusiastic as well. I wonder why the scores are so low... it isn't the best neighborhood, a lot more english learners than the school my older daughter goes to? I haven't seen behavior issues yet, but it seems sad that something is preventing the teachers from teaching, or the students from learning. Whether parental involvement in homework, the school, or all-around effort to enrich their children... with all of the programs this school offers (they are getting a drama club and they have a garden with chickens), is the problem the elephant in the room, or something less obvious?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2011

I am very happy with my daughter's experience in kindergarden in the Dual Immersion program. I love her teacher and the principal, and although the school has some pretty daunting numbers when it comes to state testing, I feel confident that my daughter's education this year has been above average, and I believe that working with her at home has counteracted any possible negativbe effects of attending a school with lower STAR scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2011

My child moved here from another school, and we couldn't be happier. The dual immersion program has been great, and we love the after school programs offered in conjunction with the park district. The principal has great vision for the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2010

Our principal Mr. Lindeman is absolutely fabulous the teachers and students love and respect him. He gives 120% to his job. I don't think that these ratings are accurate. The teachers are inspiring and there is many extracurricular activities offered and even more are being proposed for next year. Our school is a hidden jewel tucked away with a small community feel of roughly 350 students which is perfect for an elementary school. Everyone knows everyone and no one is lost in the shuffle. Our school offers programs that no other school does in San Juan District. There is kick start kind. and next year will have dual immersion starting in the kind. class being taught english and spanish. As far as test scores they are going up everytime! Highest improvement in the district. I love this school and think of it as home away from home!.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2010

I have had 4 of my children go to school here since 1968. There are many caring teachers & staff here. Times are tough financially, but the love and learning continues on .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2009

I think the rating for this school is really harsh or perhaps outdated. The new principal, Mr. Lindeman, has really turned this school around. The API scores have jumped off the page. In fact, I believe they had the greatest increase last year of any SJUSD school. There are definitely behavior issues with the children but let's put the blame for that where it deserves to be - with the parents!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2009

Thomas Edison is making great strides this year. The principle i making a great effort to get the students more involved academically and socially, as well as the parents. There will be a great improvement in the test scores this year.


Posted September 29, 2008

With the hard work of the staff and leadership at Edison, we saw improved students achievement. However, the behavioral issues of many students are still very prominent in classes. Teachers and principal tried to encourage and motivate the child instead of too many disciplinary actions. It is a good strategy on paper, but not to other learning students and teachers. Some children are just not receptive. Parents of students with behavior issues should at least participate in class once or twice a week to see for themselves how disruptive their child is, and how it is taking away teacher's teaching time. Maybe then, they will get assistance in helping them better educat their child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2008

The staff and leadership at Thomas Edison School during the past 4 years has worked very hard to improve student achievement and the newest 77 point growth in their API score is the true reward for their efforts!


Posted August 13, 2008

My son attended from k thru 2nd. The new principal, Todd Lindeman, is this school's best new hope. He's a hands-on, positive principal. Great teachers, mostly, but the students can be overwhelming for some of them, and parents should be held accountable for their kids' lousy behavior.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 18, 2007

Great teachers, but poor parent involvement and behavioral issues with students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2006

The academic program is great! My child is learning more than he has at a private school environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2005

If I weren't so pleased with the teachers, I would have definitely taken my child out of this school. The behavior issues of many of the children seemed to take over the class as a whole.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

597

Change from
2012 to 2013

-114

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

597

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-114

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

1 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
31%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
30%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
22%

2010

 
 
11%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
36%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
19%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
25%

2010

 
 
49%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
31%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
35%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
72%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
16%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
23%

2010

 
 
15%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
18%

2010

 
 
26%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students17%
Females28%
Males6%
African American7%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino15%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)30%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Non-economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability19%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only23%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)20%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state14%

Math

All Students35%
Females41%
Males29%
African American21%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)50%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner24%
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)53%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state23%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students12%
Females16%
Males10%
African American16%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino15%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)17%
Economically disadvantaged12%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability0%
Students with no reported disability16%
English learner4%
Fluent-English proficient and English only17%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)9%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state11%

Math

All Students36%
Females37%
Males35%
African American40%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)33%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability0%
Students with no reported disability45%
English learner23%
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state36%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students43%
Females50%
Males38%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino27%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)50%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability46%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only51%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students58%
Females55%
Males61%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)44%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)54%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students24%
Females33%
Males14%
African American30%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino24%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)21%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability0%
Students with no reported disability30%
English learner7%
Fluent-English proficient and English only29%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)27%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state20%

Math

All Students35%
Females45%
Males25%
African American30%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)25%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability0%
Students with no reported disability43%
English learner21%
Fluent-English proficient and English only40%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)40%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state25%

Science

All Students20%
Females19%
Males20%
African American24%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino22%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)14%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability0%
Students with no reported disability26%
English learner20%
Fluent-English proficient and English only20%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)18%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state16%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students16%
Females24%
Males12%
African American12%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)23%
Economically disadvantaged16%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability15%
English learner0%
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate0%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state14%

Math

All Students21%
Females29%
Males18%
African American12%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)38%
Economically disadvantaged22%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability20%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only26%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate8%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state21%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 44%
White 24%
Black 20%
Two or more races 5%
Asian 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 86%N/AN/A
English language learners 31%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 9%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Todd Lindeman
Fax number
  • (916) 575-2348

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2950 Hurley Way
Sacramento, CA 95864
Website: Click here
Phone: (916) 575-2342

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