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GreatSchools Rating

San Diego Cooperative Charter School

Charter | K-8 | 382 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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59 reviews of this school


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Posted August 23, 2013

SDCCS is the most amazing school ever! I have learned so much and, contrary to what others have said, the middle school math standard(especially seventh grade) is quite high. I have gone from a third grade to a grade level education in two years, getting straight As, over 90% on test scores. I don't care what others say, this school is the best school in the entire world. We have caring teachers who are all like parents to me, and sweet people everywhere. Zero bullying is tolerated. Once two people had to apologize in front of the entire school for sending a rude email to a fellow student. I highly recommend this school. Love it! <3 <3 :) (: c:


Posted August 17, 2013

I have a 15 year old who started in kindergarten at SDCCS and is now doing very well in high school. I also have two sons who are currently enrolled at SDCCS in 7th grade and 1rst grade. I can honestly say that I wouldn't send them to any other school. I believe in the philosophy and have seen how it plays out over a 9 year period with so many kids who started in kinder with my daughter....this school fosters emotional intelligence, curiosity and confidence which is so important in the development of a child's ability to problem solve. They know how to help themselves!I really trust the community at the school and appreciate the importance placed social issues in all grades. After being there for over 11 years (with 7 more to go) I can honestly say that I don't mind some of the chaos that also goes along with a place like SDCCS with it's pets and gardens and festivals and parades and field trips and science projects happening in the hallways. It has worked extremely well for all my kids with their very different personalities!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2013

This school has been life changing for our entire family. My kids couldn't feel more loved, nutured and cared for by not just their individual teacher but by the entire staff. Academically they are challenged to taught to be critical thinkers. The social emotional cirriculum has been a postive force in guiding the school community. SDCCS students are more empathetic and caring than I could have ever dreamed. You really have never seen a school like this one!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 3, 2013

Although I think this school is making growth and overcoming adversity, I am still concerned that my son is not learning what he needs to be successful. I don't believe standards and the need for academic challenges are of interest to many of the primary teachers. I love that my son has made many friends and peer relationships are strong, however he has yet to bond with his teachers and this worries me because the 'male role model' he needs in his life is not to be found on staff in the primary grades. He will have to wait until Middle School (unless I relocate him sooner) to receive great teacher-student interaction with the male staff. I think you are doing many wonderful things SDCCS, but there is a need for new faces or a 'changing of the guard'. Teachers that have been there for over a decade need either a new role or a new setting. I know charter schools have the authority to remove educators that aren't a 'great fit' for kids. I wish the administration would recognize this and do what is best for the kids, not just keep teachers around because they are friends with one another.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 25, 2013

Wow, this school has grown by leaps and bounds in the past several years. It seems that the staff are always trying to take things up a notch and make the school even better than it already is. Don't worry about the poor rating this site has given to our wonderful school. The raters have no knowledge of this schools fabulous social/emotional curriculum, hands-on learning activities, unbelievable art program, loving dedicated teachers, kind, generous and supportive families, and hard-working leaders. When the school began recruiting some children who did not have all the advantages of the more affluent families the result was an immediate drop in test scores. It is unfortunate that the school is penalized for trying to help children who have fewer options. It's a win-win for my children though because in addition to the impressive curriculum they are also making friends with kids from many different backgrounds. To me diversity is an important consideration when looking at schools. I know this school is awesome when strangers ask where my kids go to school because they are so impressed with their behavior, thoughtfulness and intelligence. Thank you SDCCS, you are the best!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2012

I have2 kids inSDCCS, both very different with regard to learning style and temperment. Both have thrived in this supportive, nurturing environment. I too have concerns about test scores and academic rigor but I also recall that those considerations are fairly new for elementary age children. To me, this school is about what K-5 should be (and used to be) about- primarily social-emotional development, a foundation for problem solving and developing an enthusiasm for lifelong learning. New research shows over-achieving kids packed full of facts for testing are entering the work world without the ability to think creatively about complex problems. Also, with info at our fingertips, the key is knowing how to critically evaluate and apply that information. Teachers here love what they do and it shows, my kids come up with solutions to things I never considered, and Even in 3rd grade, they still play for hours on end using their imaginations. The second-step social-emotional curriculum has given us tools 4 emotional growth and I love the focus on arts, the environment and parent involvement. This school gives us alot that we used to get from neighborhood family connections.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2012

This is one amazing School. We came from out of state and we spend several months in Rady children's Hospital. My daughter had some special dietary and other needs that the school was very willing to help with and help her with continueing her education. The teachers are awesome and the staffing has been beyong top notch! If you get the chance to attend this school, please do so! you iwll never regret it!!! Thank you to everyone and the staff for all you have doen and do. They do the most amazing job with kids and are truely caring and helpful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 11, 2012

I am an alumni at this school and I simply love SDCCS. I was definitely prepared for high school. And I can't believe some of the things that has been said about this amazing school. This school is not taught to the test and is project based learning. This method was perfect for me and I excelled and even got the flying pheonix award. (which is all A's and E's both semesters the eighth grade) I go to San Diego High now and I am perfectly capable of dealing with the homework load, the method of teaching which is by all means NOT project based. I think that going to this project based school followed by a 'taught to the test' school is a perfect pair for almost all students. However if you are a parent looking for a school with amazing test scores, as you can obviously see this is not the school for you. I for one got advanced in all my test scores but some of my friends didn't. I had the best time at SDCCS and I always look forward to when I can visit my old again. I treasure the memories I have there and I adore watching my siblings go through this school all the while learning so much. Thank you SDCCS I will never forget you.


Posted December 12, 2010

This school is quite different from the average public school, and I mean that in good and bad ways(Take it from me, I'm a student at SDCCS). The teachers care about what the students learn, regardless of the tempo they learn at. They are friendly and down to earth. The only problem is that sometimes the students get off task and talk a great amount through each class. Another thing that bothers me is that most students that have been attending at SDCCS most of their life tend to push the newer kids out like they have their own group or something. If you think you want your child going here in 7th or 8th grade, I would find another choice


Posted September 5, 2010

While the school hasn't always been true to their constructivist philosophy, this year they are stronger than ever!! A major overhaul occurred with a unification of curriculum across the grades and a move toward developmentally appropriate practices that consider the whole child, brain research, and true social learning. If you're looking for a school based on test scores and memorization this is NOT the school for you. If you are looking for a school where your children learn to be competent and confident problem-solvers who actually retain what they learn long after the tests are over, then this IS the school for you. My child has never been happier and we are so happy he is valued for the unique individual he is. He has developed an amazing ability to connect what he is learning to the world and absolutely LOVES coming to school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2010

Test scores are nothing to rave about here, in fact if you are looking for a school that is academically rigorous I would count this one out. Lots of literacy instruction but little in math. The principal is easy to talk to but never follows through.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2010

This is the best possible school for my children and my family!! It has the best teachers and principal I could wish for.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 30, 2010

This school is not afraid to go forward with innovative ideas. Not afraid to Not teach to the tests. As we all know tests prove how a child tests at that place and time and not what they have really learned. Our language and music program need help. Our Art program on the other hand is loved by all, and our children's progress is easily seen. The fact that our staff is so young is both good and bad. Great that they have the stamina and energy to put into the class that they do. Not so great that they, for the most part, do not have children themselves, so it is hard for them to see as a parent sees. My children thrive here in a safe environment that does not squash their spirit. It enhances it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2010

This school is amazing. I'm quite certain my daughter wouldn't have received the socio-emotional learning she needed at a regular public school. It has been absolutely instrumental in her ability to learn academically.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2009

My son has had problems reading and I was told that he would have to be held back if he wasnt able to catch up. With all of the hard work that I did at home he still wasnt catching on. We were blessed to be accepted into this school! I am proud to say that he is now excelling!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2009

Wouldn't it be great if your kids looked forward to going to school each day? Here the kids do. Project based learning makes it fun for the kids and enables them to really understand what is learned. They also retain knowledge even longer than is necessary to get a good grade on a test. My adult friends are always quite impressed with the knowledge and critical thinking skills my child demonstrates in casual conversation. She is thrilled to be growing in such a stimulating as well as nurturing environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 22, 2008

What makes children good people, and not just good students? That's why I love this school - due to the 'whole child' focus on molding them into responsible, caring, thinking and creative adults. The children can look you in the eye and have an intelligent conversation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2008

This school is not for everybody. Parent involvement is mandatory (though not strictly enforced) so if you're looking to drop you kids off at day care and pick them up at the end of the day, then you need to go elsewhere. There is a strong emphasis on the non-academic side of the kids' brains which is refreshing. Kids that come out of this school will generally be much better equipped to relate to others. The school could use more emphasis on academics (better follow-through, setting the culture of the school to reach higher). I agree with other posters about 'clicks', however I would argue that you get that at every other school as well - it's just more magnified here due to the smaller class sizes and the fact that parents know each other more (because they're all volunteering at the school).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2008

My child attended SDCCS for several years.. he did not learn to read. after one year at another school he is at grade level!! Principal does not direct/mentor staff. She is not a good leader. New location is awful, students miss Balboa Park
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2008

My daughter absolutely loves this school. Her kindergarten teacher is so kind, loved and respected by the whole class. All of the kids are really great people too, all kind to each other, no bullies. There is a large playground area with a nice veggie/herb garden where many of the kids like to go and work or play. Each day of the week there are special classes, art, music, PE, Spanish and my daughter can already sing a song in Spanish. The best thing is that she is learning to love to learn. I am so thankful for this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

813

Change from
2012 to 2013

+32

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

813

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+32

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
51%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
40%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
52%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
69%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
32%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
32%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
76%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
5%

2011

 
 
18%

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
27%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
57%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females59%
Males55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate63%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students66%
Females55%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate70%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students55%
Females60%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate54%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate70%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students47%
Females50%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino27%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only51%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate46%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate59%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Females75%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only79%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students33%
Females25%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)32%
Economically disadvantaged8%
Non-economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate38%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate36%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students79%
Females85%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino76%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students27%
Females22%
Males32%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino12%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)41%
Economically disadvantaged0%
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability26%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate31%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate40%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students64%
Females63%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged23%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females77%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability65%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate77%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students56%
Females48%
Males62%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino47%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Non-economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate38%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate68%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females76%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented64%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students58%
Females61%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students52%
Females31%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)50%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged50%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females53%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students37%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only40%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students52%
Females35%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability51%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only53%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate56%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students68%
Females47%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged42%
Non-economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 57% 27%
Hispanic 26% 51%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Asian 5% 11%
Black 4% 7%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 29%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Wendy Ranck-Buhr
Fax number
  • (858) 467-9741

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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7260 Linda Vista Road
San Diego, CA 92111
Website: Click here
Phone: (858) 496-1613

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