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GreatSchools Rating

Innovations Academy

Charter | K-8 | 150 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 25 ratings

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89 reviews of this school


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Posted December 13, 2013

I have been to this school since I was in 3rd grade it is so amazing there's no homework and you get to learn about the future and math and all that without homework and all that stress dont listen to all thoses silly reviews about not going to this school because you improve ever single day


Posted October 21, 2013

This is our first year at IA. The reason our son is going to this school is because we we didnt feel that our public middle school was right for him so we heard about this school and decided to check it out. So far my son and us love the school. Its great for him since he is more of a hands on learner and they have a no homework policy which we all love since we can spend that after school time together as a family without the stress of homework. So far so good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2013

If the school year ended today it would be considered a great year for my two children. We needed an alternative way of teaching and they are enjoying school for the first time. Getting up for school and telling me to hurry up. I love the attitude change. They have other needs that are being addressed as well. So far I am pleased with this school. Also, they have let me be involved as a parent. I really like that they are addressing the children's problem solving skills, thinking for themselves, how to speak up in there education-social and personal needs. So many parents are so controlling there kids are suffering. There is self growth and leadership qualities encouraged daily. I'm excited for this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 7, 2013

This school is run by a HORRIBLE Principal / administrator. Christine Kuglen is demeaning to parents and children especially if she perceives that you are questioning what is best for your child and how they are being taught or not being taught, if you question what is going on in the class, or if you have questions that a concerned parent may want to ask and deserve to be able to ask - if she has not approved of you or your child - she can be the most unreasonable person to try to work with (this is an understatement folks). Christine Kuglen should not be running a school with impressionable children - she has made threats, said disrespectful despicable comments to parents, shown extremely unprofessional behavior in front of parents and her staff with no care at all about her being the head representative of "her" school. If she is a model for her staff then WATCH OUT. Your family deserves much better. She is not garnering the local community support because of her irrational behavior and attitude.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2013

I am a student of innovations and i strongly recommend that you do not send your child here if you are not new age the staff is very unprofessional about complaints and harass you until you give up.


Posted October 31, 2012

So after a few weeks at the neighborhood school, I decided to check out other options. I found Innovations Academy through a link on the sandi.net website, and decided to pay the school a visit. I was really impressed by the atmosphere of the school, the smiles on the faces of the students, the parent and community involvement, the genuine compassion of the teachers, and the caring and helpful attitude of the office staff and director. It has been less than 2 weeks since our sons have been attending Innovations Academy, and the difference is clear. By given latitude in their learning, choices in their classroom activities, and freedom to move about the spaces, both of my children have blossomed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2012

My daughter goes to Innovations and she and we love it!!!! She was at Marshall Middle which is an excellent school, but with the budget cuts has gone downhill tremendously. For example, last year her math teacher was literally incompetent. We begged to have her moved out of the class, as did many other parents. The administration knew of this teacher but since he had seniority, he stayed and the new good teachers received pink slips...Way to go teacher's union, you could care less about educating our kids it seems. We spent a fortune on math tutoring and her brother who is a math major at a UC school had to help as did we.... ultimately in spite of the school she did ok in that class. But at IA so far all is going great and the one on one teaching seems to fit our daughter much much better.. They are dedicated to educating your children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2012

My 2 sons go to Innovations Academy Charter School in San Diego, CA. I can't begin to tell you how positively affected they have been by their experience at this charter school. The whole philosophy of the school is just what they need to realize their full potential as learners. My younger son tested 99% on the GATE (Gifted and Talented Education) test but never got more than B's and C's in his school work. He always just skated through under the radar of his teachers and did just what was necessary. At Innovations Academy the teachers take the time to focus on how every student learns. We took our boys out of public school and moved them to a private school with a traditional approach to learning. They did 3-4 hours of homework nightly, took tests, learned how to take notes in class. They were both very stressed out and anxious during that year. When Innovations Academy opened in our neighborhood my husband and I decided to try it out. Now both of my sons are excited about what they are learning in school,can't wait to go to school every day, and definitely less stressed about "grades".
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2012

This is a review for the Home Learning Community at the school. Up until this last academic year, my daughter was going to a highly-rated public school where she was miserable. Now that she goes to IA, she is so much more happier. It is a lot more balanced, and the school cares more about the kids than how they perform on the STAR tests (to tell the truth, they don't care at all how they perform on this test). It is so refreshing from the push, push, push of the academically-minded public schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2012

I have a late birthday kindergarten student at Innovations. I am thrilled with the mass opportunities the school is offering my child. I am credentialed and know the standards well. My child is exceeding all of them and comes home creating her own homework. My child loves to graph words (by number of letters), show off reading and writing skills learned in class. Comes home telling me all kinds of interesting facts and interests developed through her project based learning days. I can't praise the program enough for offering such a broad based learning forum. As an educator and parent, it pains me to see all the cuts to excellent arts, science, and multicultural education. I.A. delivers these critical programs and intertwines them into core curriculum. 5 Stars from me!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2011

I know how wonderful IA seems at first. If your child has special needs, please beware. There is initial elation when you experience the no-homework policy. You will feel that your child and his/her gifts are finally being recognized. As a parent whose child's needs were egregiously ignored by IA staff, I urge you to pay close attention to the work your child is (or is not) doing, and to what is actually occurring in the classroom. Though we didn't move to the new site, my view is not sour grapes. The move upset me because I feared -- 100% inaccurately -- that my child could not perform elsewhere. I'd already begun to realize that IA's freeform non-curricula and classroom chaos were not serving my child. We are now at a rigorous small charter. Unlike at IA, my child has close attention, daily assessments (as do all students), and the nurturing and expert help of an experienced Resource Specialist. She is not slipping between the cracks. Unlike at IA, staff is accountable, her goals are being monitored, she feels confident and challenged. Her first report card's GPA was a 3.2. This, after being told publicly at IA that she was "not the smartest girl in the class."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2011

We are so happy that Innovations Academy has come into the community of Scripps Ranch. This has this given us an excellent alternative to the schools within our own neighborhood and allowed us to give our children a quality education without moving them to the private sector in other areas of San Diego. Our 6th grade son actually said to us last Sunday that he didn t want a weekend break from school as he was having such a good time working on the projects in his classroom. Our 5th grade son, who has an IEP, has become more confident and outgoing as a result of the nurturing, small classroom environment that embraces differences and finds ways of teaching to each child. As a mom, I couldn t be more pleased. That each child is a partner in the IA educational community and accountable for his and her actions to their peers is just icing on the cake. Thank you so much for everything. The Rosens
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2011

IA's approach is so refreshing! They are the first school my son has been to that teaches Critical Thinking and has him apply his knowledge. This is very important to me. So many schools are based on memorizing! Not Innovations! His teachers can even make vocabulary more applicable to his everyday life than his prior schools. Teachers can really do students a disservice when it comes to vocabulary, but not at IA! Their system works! My son has had vocabulary tests for 7 years, but never had it the IA way! He now uses his new words in his everyday language, and finds them in novels and understands them - no more insignificant words. Sometimes memorizing something for a test is actually easier for some students than being on the spot and having to perform with their new knowledge, but Innovations doesn't take the easy way. They take the right way! The students will know more because they live it and don't just memorize something! This Chinese Proverb says it best: Tell me and I'll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I'll understand.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 7, 2011

I just want to thank you for the opportunity you have provided for my daughter who is attending your school. We weren t sure what the expectations were but the limited homework was a real selling point, as you might imagine to a student with ADHD and learning disabilities !!! I wanted to share with you the comments my daughters tutor, a retired elementary teacher in the San Diego Unified School District for over 30 years, had to say about our daughter: I think the new school is wonderful for her. I have never seen her so enthusiastic about learning. They obviously are using strategies that help her and don't keep her confined to a desk for long periods of time. As you are well aware, kids with ADD and ADHD don't do well in that kind of a structure. She is very focused and eager to do what I ask of her. I really think the change to a new school has been a positive one for her and I am excited to see how she progresses this year! To reiterate the words of her tutor, We are excited to see how she progresses this year !!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2011

What a disappointing experience in IA last year. The teacher I saw routinely threw fits to express dismay at poor class behavior. There was no regard for safety of kids getting picked up. This school came about with such promise. We had high hopes for innovative ideas and creative experiences. But what we got was chaos, filthy classrooms, and unprofessional staff. I didn't see any promises or programs delivered on. I still don't want a school that "teaches to the test" which is one key tenet of IA (for those who lament their low test scores, just an FYI) but I do want a school that teaches. Their move to Scripps Ranch left a lot of their student body in the dust, but part of me feels glad that the kids will have a chance for a better education by finding new schools for next school year. I don't recommend this school for any type of kid, special needs, athletic, gifted, etc. If hanging out all day doing questionably educational activities is a good fit for your kid, than perhaps IA would work for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 5, 2011

I attended IA my 7th and 8th grade year and loved it. I felt very comforable in the small classes. The relationships I had with my teachers were awesome. I felt like the really cared about me and my work, because they had small classes they were able to give us all the amount of care we each needed. I struggled greatly in math, but our math teacher was understanding and worked me through everything. I loved my writers workshop, we all got to write about subjects that intrested us and were personal. My 8th grade class was a family and I loved thghat, I was so close with my class. I may not have had a luch room or playground, but i did have teachers and peers that cared and loved me.


Posted June 15, 2011

High student turnover is a sign that something is very wrong at this school. There is no consistent curriculum, few books, few resources and limited computers. Teachers vary widely in their teaching style, and there is no consistency from grade to grade. Many of the teachers are uncredentialed, or only nominally credentialed. Some of them are wonderful...others less so. Criticism is viewed as disloyal. Many refuse to speak out for fear of reprisals, those who have, have been harassed, until they leave in disgust. The District refuses to do anything about complaints. There is no true oversight, and no one to complain to if your child isn't being served. Small class sizes won't remain so for long. Many former IA families who have left have discovered serious deficiencies in their children's education, despite having come to IA at or above grade level. While IA may not "teach to the test"..they also don't teach much at all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2011

This is not a great school. We have not been happy with this school. Low STAR test scores say it all. My children chose to return after leaving last year and our family regrets it. Two years too long! Our children are brilliant students. One was challenged while the other was not. One child was bullied repeatedly even though they teach conflict resolution in their social-emotional program. One child was very happy in class. If only they could make all their teachers like that one.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2011

I have two children at IA (kindergarten and 5th grade). My youngest is doing wonderful considering this has been the first time attending any kind of program away from me ever. I have never seen my child so in dependant and full of confidence on a daily basis. Everyday when leaving for school I get a kiss goodbye, the car door close and walks away head held high. My children have been yearning for a school where they could actually be involved in their classroom and school. They feel like they are part of they school not just a student taking up space. The staff, I have to say as a parent it is wonderful to be able to call (or go in to the school) anytime of the day that they take time with you. If I took the time to think about all the things I didn t like about a school of course I would find things that are wrong. No school is perfect and a school that runs itself along that line is not the type of school I as a mother would want for my children. At IA my children are given a chance to learn, explore and thrive without having all the negative problems of peer pressure and society. We are very happy at IA when the school moves we are moving with them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2011

If you believe in project based learning, you will love this school. If you don't believe in homework, you will love this school. If the most important thing is that your child is happy, then you will love this school. If you value proficiency on the STAR tests, you will be a stressed out parent. Be prepared to supplement your child's learning if you want them to keep up with academic standards. Parents, please read about project based learning and positive discipline before considering IA.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

745

Change from
2012 to 2013

-3

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

745

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-3

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

2 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
43%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
11%

2010

 
 
24%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
21%

2010

 
 
24%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
71%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
20%

2010

 
 
24%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
15%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
10%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
54%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
31%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
40%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students39%
Females35%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate42%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students31%
Females22%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)35%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only32%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate33%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students28%
Females27%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)39%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability27%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only28%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students43%
Females40%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females67%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students50%
Females47%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females50%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate60%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students22%
Females17%
Males26%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)30%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability24%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate12%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate33%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students62%
Females61%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate53%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate60%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females45%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate64%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students45%
Females36%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)43%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females69%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate77%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students21%
Females21%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)23%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability23%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate31%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students43%
Females65%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)41%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students39%
Females62%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)36%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students44%
Females47%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)47%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate41%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students57%
Females53%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate53%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 44% 27%
Hispanic 32% 51%
Two or more races 9% 3%
Asian 7% 11%
Black 6% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 73%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Christine Kuglen

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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10380 Spring Canyon Road
San Diego, CA 92131
Website: Click here
Phone: (858) 271-1414

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