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Innovations Academy

Charter | K-8

 

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Living in San Diego

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $525,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $2,070.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 11 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 25 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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97 reviews of this school


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Posted June 23, 2014

I.A. gets better and better every year! The philosophy is in line with mine: Raising intelligent, conscience and confident children! Great communication with the parents. Always looking to improve. There is room for improvement and I.A. welcomes your opinion. To be clear, "no homework" policy is really, "no MINDLESS homework." You as the parent can and may want to establish homework ritual for your child. We do. But, NO STRESS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2014

We just love this school and wish we had found it sooner! My son with ADHD and sensory processing disorder,struggled with social emotional, which effected his academics and confidence in his traditional school. The social emotional curriculum, hands-on project work and minimal homework have helped him love school and excel at math, writing and speaking. He now wants to do some math and journal writing over the summer without being asked!!!! This school makes every kid feel respected and valued and gives them confidence and motivation that makes them know they can do anything!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2014

Don't do it people! It's seems all great at first. Listen to every bad review on here. They do not prepare your child for anything, children are unsupervised, then when things get out of hand they blame the kids... The Director is very hard to deal with, she will always side with the teachers..after a few weeks there, parents will figure out what really happens there...it's disturbing.. Trust me!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2014

We are completing our first year at Innovations Academy, and we LOVE it!! Our bias is former teacher in Poway District, and member of a small specialty Command in the US Navy. My reservations in the beginning were if my son, who hated school, would thrive in such and independant, structure. He develoed an amazing unique personality, and confidence soared. Our daughter succeeds in any environment, so naturally she thrived as well. Parent involvement is surprisingly low, especially in financial donations, however, it could contribute to the happiness of the IA Families b/c the school does not pressure anyone about donations. Finally, use discernment in reading negative reviews, you may pick up on lack of communication with the school and their children. The school, and their staff, will accommodate a private meeting to address your concerns with little Johnny or Sally.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2014

We love the environment and community focus here. My 6 year old feels safe and accepted, which makes for a great environment for him to learn and grow in. The no unecessary homework policy allows for family learning time, instead of having to stress and fight about homework during our family time. We are pretty new at the school, but already love it and are looking forward to next year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2014

We are so happy with Innovations Academy! This will be our third year with the school...our children will be going into 4th and 2nd. The school seems to improve more and more each year! My children are being challenged academically while developing wonderful social skills and growing emotionally. The fabulous part is they enjoy school...they are developing a love of learning which will carry them through life. They do not have a no homework policy (as some have previously stated), it is a no "meaningless" homework policy. My children have come home with work from time if something wasn't completed for the week, a project needed additional work or home preparation or if a subject needed reinforcement. The difference is there are no daily worksheets that used to cause countless tears and struggle. One of the things I love the most about the school are the enrichment opportunities...art, media arts, gardening, music, PE... Yes, schools have them, but not to the level we are experiencing at IA. Those things are so valuable and important and they are disappearing from our public schools. This amazing school is something you have to witness first hand to fully appreciate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2014

I am so glad that we discovered IA. We had a very disappointing experience at the neighborhood public school where my son was stressed out beyond belief trying to keep up with the academic pressure placed on him there. It really affected his self confidence. We have been at IA for two years now and my son has blossomed both socially and academically. The teachers and staff here really seem to care about the students and I appreciate that they are tolerant and respectful that kids learn in different ways and at different levels. My son has since been found to have a learning disability, and the staff at IA have been very helpful in accommodating him in the classroom and recommending resources to help him learn. In addition, I appreciate that the students at IA are encouraged to express themselves creatively and also to think critically. I feel that in addition to learning the core academic subjects, they also learn important life skills, like how to work effectively in peer groups, how to give and receive feedback, and how to speak publicly. These are gifts we can give our children at a young age that will help them succeed in the future. Overall, a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2014

Honestly, half the staff here is incompetent (Just entered high school) and it was honestly was not what i needed. The children are always alone in the class rooms while the teachers wander off (whether they say so or not). The no homework thing sounds well enough at first, but later on your children will come to expect that, what happens in high school? In college when their cramming for an exam all night? The fact is if i could take back from going there i would, I would have a much better time here in the real world if so....


Posted May 28, 2014

My daughter will be attending Kinder this fall and has not yet (and I haven't decided) attended Innovation Academy, my only experience w/ the school is the Info Meeting parents are required to attend in order to submit an application. I live in the Poway school district however was looking for a school that was 'Project Based/Inquiry Based" learning, unfortunately the Poway district does not have. I was excited there was a Charter school nearby that employs this teaching method. I attended the info meeting and left not knowing whether or not it was the right environment for my child. The school director/founder facilitates the meeting and she was very off-putting. The impression I walked away with, and what the director actually said, was that if your teaching philosophy does not align with hers, than this is not the school for you. Keep in mind that the director was a stay a home mom who decided to open her own school. Trying not to judge her, but did not see any sort of real education or child development background that she mentioned about herself. The teachers at the meeting did not impress me when answering questions from parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2014

I know that other parents (including some friends of mine) have had problems with the staff at Innovations Academy, but I never have, and my children are flourishing there. If you are thinking about your children attending this school, you should go there and check it out for yourself. Have your children shadow for a day, talk to the teachers and other staff members. As with all schools, communication is key! I have found that by talking to the teachers directly about my goals and expectations for my children's education, and being open to receiving their help, I have seen huge positive results over the course of the school year. This type of school is not a good fit for many families, but if you are looking for some alternative to conventional classroom education, this school is worth checking out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2014

Not what I would consider a good experience. The teacher our child had was very new age, was passive aggressive, and there was a general lack of respect and maturity. Also a lack of structure, discipline, and quality. Teachers seem to have a free reign without boundaries. We discovered this after the teacher called a student a very inappropriate name, slanted his teaching toward his own beliefs, and shared private information from parent administrator meetings with the class on multiple occasions. Administrator will eventually back the teachers, even when serious issues are backed by multiple parents. I do not recommend sending your child to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 13, 2013

I have been to this school since I was in 3rd grade it is so amazing there's no homework and you get to learn about the future and math and all that without homework and all that stress dont listen to all thoses silly reviews about not going to this school because you improve ever single day


Posted October 21, 2013

This is our first year at IA. The reason our son is going to this school is because we we didnt feel that our public middle school was right for him so we heard about this school and decided to check it out. So far my son and us love the school. Its great for him since he is more of a hands on learner and they have a no homework policy which we all love since we can spend that after school time together as a family without the stress of homework. So far so good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2013

If the school year ended today it would be considered a great year for my two children. We needed an alternative way of teaching and they are enjoying school for the first time. Getting up for school and telling me to hurry up. I love the attitude change. They have other needs that are being addressed as well. So far I am pleased with this school. Also, they have let me be involved as a parent. I really like that they are addressing the children's problem solving skills, thinking for themselves, how to speak up in there education-social and personal needs. So many parents are so controlling there kids are suffering. There is self growth and leadership qualities encouraged daily. I'm excited for this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2013

I am a student of innovations and i strongly recommend that you do not send your child here if you are not new age the staff is very unprofessional about complaints and harass you until you give up.


Posted October 22, 2012

My daughter goes to Innovations and she and we love it!!!! She was at Marshall Middle which is an excellent school, but with the budget cuts has gone downhill tremendously. For example, last year her math teacher was literally incompetent. We begged to have her moved out of the class, as did many other parents. The administration knew of this teacher but since he had seniority, he stayed and the new good teachers received pink slips...Way to go teacher's union, you could care less about educating our kids it seems. We spent a fortune on math tutoring and her brother who is a math major at a UC school had to help as did we.... ultimately in spite of the school she did ok in that class. But at IA so far all is going great and the one on one teaching seems to fit our daughter much much better.. They are dedicated to educating your children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2012

My 2 sons go to Innovations Academy Charter School in San Diego, CA. I can't begin to tell you how positively affected they have been by their experience at this charter school. The whole philosophy of the school is just what they need to realize their full potential as learners. My younger son tested 99% on the GATE (Gifted and Talented Education) test but never got more than B's and C's in his school work. He always just skated through under the radar of his teachers and did just what was necessary. At Innovations Academy the teachers take the time to focus on how every student learns. We took our boys out of public school and moved them to a private school with a traditional approach to learning. They did 3-4 hours of homework nightly, took tests, learned how to take notes in class. They were both very stressed out and anxious during that year. When Innovations Academy opened in our neighborhood my husband and I decided to try it out. Now both of my sons are excited about what they are learning in school,can't wait to go to school every day, and definitely less stressed about "grades".
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2012

This is a review for the Home Learning Community at the school. Up until this last academic year, my daughter was going to a highly-rated public school where she was miserable. Now that she goes to IA, she is so much more happier. It is a lot more balanced, and the school cares more about the kids than how they perform on the STAR tests (to tell the truth, they don't care at all how they perform on this test). It is so refreshing from the push, push, push of the academically-minded public schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2012

I have a late birthday kindergarten student at Innovations. I am thrilled with the mass opportunities the school is offering my child. I am credentialed and know the standards well. My child is exceeding all of them and comes home creating her own homework. My child loves to graph words (by number of letters), show off reading and writing skills learned in class. Comes home telling me all kinds of interesting facts and interests developed through her project based learning days. I can't praise the program enough for offering such a broad based learning forum. As an educator and parent, it pains me to see all the cuts to excellent arts, science, and multicultural education. I.A. delivers these critical programs and intertwines them into core curriculum. 5 Stars from me!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2011

I know how wonderful IA seems at first. If your child has special needs, please beware. There is initial elation when you experience the no-homework policy. You will feel that your child and his/her gifts are finally being recognized. As a parent whose child's needs were egregiously ignored by IA staff, I urge you to pay close attention to the work your child is (or is not) doing, and to what is actually occurring in the classroom. Though we didn't move to the new site, my view is not sour grapes. The move upset me because I feared -- 100% inaccurately -- that my child could not perform elsewhere. I'd already begun to realize that IA's freeform non-curricula and classroom chaos were not serving my child. We are now at a rigorous small charter. Unlike at IA, my child has close attention, daily assessments (as do all students), and the nurturing and expert help of an experienced Resource Specialist. She is not slipping between the cracks. Unlike at IA, staff is accountable, her goals are being monitored, she feels confident and challenged. Her first report card's GPA was a 3.2. This, after being told publicly at IA that she was "not the smartest girl in the class."
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

745

Change from
2012 to 2013

-3

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

745

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-3

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

2 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
43%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
31%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
11%

2010

 
 
24%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
28%

2011

 
 
21%

2010

 
 
24%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
71%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
32%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
20%

2010

 
 
24%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

45 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
20%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
15%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
45%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
41%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
10%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
54%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
31%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
40%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students39%
Females35%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate42%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students31%
Females22%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)35%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability35%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only32%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate33%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students28%
Females27%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)39%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged30%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability27%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only28%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students43%
Females40%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged48%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females67%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate75%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students50%
Females47%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females50%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate60%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students22%
Females17%
Males26%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)30%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability24%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate12%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate33%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students62%
Females61%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged62%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate53%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate60%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females45%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate64%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students45%
Females36%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)43%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability55%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females69%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate77%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students21%
Females21%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)23%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged21%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability23%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only21%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate31%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students43%
Females65%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)41%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged33%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students39%
Females62%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)36%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged36%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students44%
Females47%
Males41%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)47%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate41%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students57%
Females53%
Males63%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate53%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 56% 26%
Hispanic 21% 52%
Two or more races 11% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 11%
Black 5% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 42%N/A48%
Male 58%N/A51%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 1%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 7%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Gardening teacher(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Gardening teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Graphics
  • Video / Film production

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Christine Kuglen

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Gardening teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Special education coordinator
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Computer lab
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Playground
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Graphics
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Monitor the playground
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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10380 Spring Canyon Road
San Diego, CA 92131
Website: Click here
Phone: (858) 271-1414

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