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Torrey Pines High School

Public | 9-12

 

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Living in San Diego

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $672,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,380.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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51 reviews of this school


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Posted Friday, July 25, 2014

This school is amazing for high achievers. To address some of the other reviews - yes, all the best teachers are with the higher AP/honors classes and are more hands off. I've taken 15 APs (gotten all A's), and found that the AP teachers expect you to self study more, like you would in college. For example, some make homework optional, but if you were wise about it, you would do it. If you are unable to push yourself, don't take the class and then blame the teachers. The non- honors/ AP teachers will go slower and make baby steps. About the work load, sometimes there is a lot, but it all comes down to time management. My teachers have all been GREAT and have definitely taught me a lot and are always willing to help. Same with counselors - go talk to them - I visit my counselor throughout the year and she knows who I am and is really nice. As for bullies, I personally don't know any and haven't seen any. And, extracurriculars at TP are very strong. They look for dedicated and passionate people. And, in all, I think TP really pushed me a lot. If you are a student that is not motivated and doesn't want to do any work, you might have some issues at TP - stop blaming the school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 21, 2013

Torrey Pines High School (TPHS) is a great school!. Most of the teachers are excellent, and strive to bring the best out of their students. The English Dept. is up there with the best across the nation. The art department also, from regular art to electronic art. My daughter's goal in life is to be an author/illustrator and at 17, has already written/illustrated and published several children's books partly due to the wonderful English program at TPHS. Their ISOL program (Independent Study On Line) is a fantastic option for students who prefer to take a subject on line using the internet. My daughter is taking ISOL now and also previously completed several ISOL courses the year before with a resulting high learning curve. Independent study doesn't work for all students, but it definitely is a superb option for those that have good time management skills. TPHS has a good cross section of students from various economic levels and supports all equally with various program to assist those students needing help study-wise and also economically. As a parent I feel fortunate to have my child enrolled at Torrey Pines high school. My daughter feels the same.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2013

Torrey Pines High School is a powerhouse in academics, sports, and arts. It has received various awards for its clubs, Science Olympiad, Mock Trial, journalism, and more. There's a very friendly and diverse atmosphere with people of various backgrounds and cultures. One thing I will say though, is that some teachers, especially at the Honors and AP level are very hands off, and unless you seek help yourself, you won't get any. It is very competitive here, and several friends are taking over 4 AP courses as a sophomore, plus extracurriculars. A problem is that if you aren't extremely motivated and can't handle higher level courses, there's a huge gap between Honors/ AP and college prep level courses. I'm taking AP Chem this year along with a full set of AP and Honors courses and it is seriously overwhelming. I switched into AP Chemistry from general chemistry and the difference in difficulty is astounding. In general it took a month to learn metric conversions when in one block between classes, we were assigned Chemical Nomenclature, Scientific Notation, SigFigs, Mole to Gram Conversions, and Metric Conversions. The next day doesn't get any easier, so choose your classes wisely.
—Submitted by a student


Posted July 11, 2013

TPHS offers a solid opportunity for students, and a high percentage of quality, dedicated staff. A number of students earn regional, state, and /or national recognition while a high percentage of students graduate, and go on to matriculate in prestigious university programs. A weak link appears to be its open enrollment initiative, and the corresponding detachment of prerequisites for advancement to classes of higher complexity. Parents need to be mindful of beneficial skills for advanced courses even as formal requirements are undefined.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2013

Teachers here are not involved. They do not interact with the students rather, they just pass out worksheets and expect the students' tutors (paid for by the parents) to teach them the material. These teachers have abdicated their responsibilities. Moreover, I would like to know what percentage of TP kids are receiving tutoring as a result of the poor quality of teaching taking place at this school. I wish other parents would observe what is going on in the classroom rather than be so consumed with making $$$. Wake up parents, money doesn't tell the whole picture. Parents, ever wonder why you need a tutor for your kid? Sit in your kid's class for a whole week and you should have it figured out. Also, there is a huge drug problem that is underground here. Don't be fooled. Lastly, look at the break down of the SAT and CST scores. It's pretty much the same for each group in all schools across SD County. As one kid put it, "At this school, the fear of failure is more heavily emphasized than the desire to succeed."
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2013

I transfered here from another school in the middle of my junior year and I would have to say this school was a big improvement. After being to 3 schools, a charter, a private and here, I find Torrey Pines to be the best. Personally I feel that Torrey offers a wide variety of paths for students to take wether they plan to get into a prestiges university, or just achieve a diploma, but its up to the student to take the initiative to take the right classes and find his/her way to there goal. I will say, some of the teachers here are just god awful. I have had 1 or 2 that clearly are there only to collect a paycheck and want no part in helping students learn in any way. On the other hand, I have also had some great teachers here who are more commited and sincere than any other previous teacher I've had elsewhere. So when it comes to faculty its a hit and miss but overall I'd say it scores pretty steady. The caliber of education at Torrey Pines is nothing vigorous, I myself wish I challenged myself with more AP classes but I should mention that it is in no way lousy. The school is probably the best of all SDUHSD schools with the exception of Canyon crest.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 27, 2013

The teachers at this school are pathetic. My chemistry teacher acts as if we already know how to do the problems that he assigns us just by reading what is in the book. His style of teaching is very flawed and confuses a lot of the students. They way he helps us learn anything is just going over the HW which nobody understood because he assigns us new material before even taught any of it. the only way to get a good grade in his class is to get help from a tutor or someone who could guide you through it.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 20, 2013

My daughter is in her second year of AP classes. In her history class she watched popular (not history) movies and taught herself the course. In her biology class she had to hire a tutor to teach the material because the teacher sat in her office and let the class figure it out on their own. In her statistics class she is teaching herself since her teacher has never taught anything more advanced than algebra in an inner city school. In her English class her teacher has her write 2 essays a day and returns them without comment. She has received the same score for 6 months and has no idea how to get better. Those great test scores coming from this school are coming from kids and families who do the work on their own at home. If you don't have a genius, save the brain damage and go to a private school. At least there the teachers have to teach or they don't get paid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2012

AWFUL. My son has attended both Canyon Crest and Torrey Pines. At TP the non-AP classes are literally a joke. My son had just a few teachers that I would consider "teachers". The rest were just collecting a paycheck. The classes consisted assigning book reading (she could have done that at home), watching movies, and more often than not over an hour of time with literally nothing going on. I would not have believed it if I hadn't seen it with my own eyes. Check for yourself. Manufacture a reason to be on campus and then walk by your kids' classroom a couple times. I'm incredulous. These kids don't stand a chance in the hyper-competitive, flat world they'll live in. IN CONTRAST CCA was pretty good. There was actually instruction going on in all the classes. I don't know where a lot of these reviews are coming from but this school is seriously flawed and needs to be completely re-examined. I like to think I'm a focus-on-the-positives person and I can't remember the last bad review I gave, but this education from a supposedly "top tier" school is truly appalling. LOOK for yourself. TP is resting on its laurels. Kids are succeeding in spite of the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2010

My child is now in her third (junior) year at TPHS. She picked TPHS in part because several good friends were going there and in part because it is walking distance from our home. Two+ years later I am very glad this was her choice. The education she is getting is top notch. Her teachers have very high expectations for students which her mostly very motivated fellow students enjoy meeting. Both academic and sports achievement are celebrated. In several different classes, she has been asked to do collaborative projects in which she has learned to work with teams of students with diverse capacities and skills, learning management and negotiation skills that I did not learn until my thirties. Her walking helps her develop independence and a community orientation, and is good for the environment. I also like that her sports training is done far from freeway (particle and chemical) pollution.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2010

This is one of the schools that have alot of variety. Because of this, the teachers cannot discipline or answer students' questions very well. There is never a sense of honor, nor a sense of what it feels to be moral and great. Additionally, the students are provided with so much menial work that they become deficient at self-awareness. Furthermore, the teachers mainly try to provide care for the lower levelled students. For example, a teacher took 30 minutes lecturing the importance of homework. Our children are already in high school. They already should know this, and it's very scary that this is happening. Furthermore, some people may argue that the school has many Ivy Leagues and good students.That's because they do their own work. Any belief that the school can help them in any extracurriculars very deeply is a fallacy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2010

As an alum of TP, I still am filled with TP pride. Top notch academics, athletics, and extracurriculars combined with the motivation and drive of a significant portion of the student body makes TP one of the top high schools in the nation. The only thing that will hold your child back at this school is his or her motivation as essentially all the resources available to them are at their fingertips. I attend an Ivy League university, and TP did an amazing job to both academically and socially prepare me. In fact, I can say with 100% certainty that many of my TP teachers provided better teaching than my professors at college and some of my courses from TP (particularly in science and math) were more challenging and in-depth than comparable courses at my Ivy League institutition. TP was excellent preparation for college and the real world.


Posted January 17, 2010

Great school with great teachers. Highly competitive; will get you into an Ivy League college if you do well here. Principal is open to all, fair, and consistant. Would recommend this school to anyone with super high standards.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2009

I have been a parent at Torrey PInes for 6 years and it is the 'grand dame' of all public high schools in San Diego County. We moved to the area so our children could attend this high school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2009

The thing about Torrey Pines is that it is in one of the wealthiest (if not the weathiest) areas of San Diego county. Therefore, a lot of the students here have parents who have poured money into their education including private tutors and college counselers. This does make the academics very competetive for students who would be in the top 5% at other schools. This is the only thing that I have found that I do not like at TP, though. There are so many school-sponsored extracurricular activities to get involved in as well as a ton of clubs. There is a place for everybody as long as you find your niche. There is just a certain pride that comes with going to TP that other schools don't have and I am definetly proud to say that I'm a Falcon!
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 26, 2008

Torrey Pines really focuses on its high-achieving students. It pours many many resources into AP and honors classes, to the detriment of the average student who wants a high-quality yet not overly intense schedule. It is plainly obvious that TPHS funnels all of its best teachers to its advanced courses, leaving the average and sub-par teachers to college-prep classes. So, bottom line: if you are an average student, you will get the short end of stick from Torrey Pines.
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 5, 2008

Honestly, I don't think that TP does cater to the highly motivated students. Smart kids do well because they're smart, motivated, and come from good families. No matter who you are, it's impossible to get in to see your counselor...as to the review below, A students don't get in right away. But neither does anyone-- it's just a very unfriendly, cutthroat, competitive place, and it's incredibly easy (no matter who you are) to get lost.
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 31, 2008

Torrey Pines caters to highly motivated students that are doing really well. If this is your child then it is a good choice. But, if your child is simply average then they will be lost in the scuffle of making sure the best and brightest continue to get ahead. My child, a very average kid, received A, B, & C s and graduated with a B average. Why then, after taking placement testing at a JUNIOR College, were they placed in bonehead math and English? My other observation is that my kids either NEVER got to see their counselor or were finally given an audience with the pope after 2-3 weeks. Again, the A students get in right away.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2008

i think that torrey pines offers something for everyone- exellent, average, and bad students. For those interested in particular subjects, there are teachers who are buffs in their field and can establish meaningful relationships with you. the teachers are of course, varied in their skill, like any high school. overall, i think the strength of this scholol is that it allows you to deterimine your own path and supports you.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 9, 2007

I feel that something needs to be done about the homework load. Has anyone ever heard of balance? There are only so many hours in a day. We students are going to be burnt out before we hit college! Give us a break. We can still learn with less homework. How about the choices or options with homework and then you pay the consequences as far as a bad grade if you do not know your stuff? Or does that look bad for the school's reputation if everything is not perfecto as far as scores? In a nutshell, we need to get away from concentrating on test scores and start thinking about the overall success, confidence, and happiness of each and every individual student in this school.
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

895

Change from
2012 to 2013

+7

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

895

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+7

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 25% in 2013.

117 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
13%

2011

 
 
9%

2010

 
 
17%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 65% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%
Biology/Life Sciences

The state average for Biology/Life Sciences was 58% in 2013.

532 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
88%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 38% in 2013.

85 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
51%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 62% in 2013.

645 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
84%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 16% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
13%

2012

 
 
0%

2011

 
 
21%

2010

 
 
41%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 45% in 2013.

441 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
61%
Integrated/Coordinated Science I

The state average for Integrated/Coordinated Science I was 26% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Physics

The state average for Physics was 38% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a
World History

The state average for World History was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 13% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
8%

2012

 
 
0%

2011

 
 
0%

2010

 
 
3%
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 39% in 2013.

451 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
52%
Biology/Life Sciences

The state average for Biology/Life Sciences was 41% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
66%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 46% in 2013.

418 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
77%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 35% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
12%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 52% in 2013.

667 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
79%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 15% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
19%

2011

 
 
8%

2010

 
 
6%
High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

The state average for High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11) was 76% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
98%
Science

The state average for Science was 54% in 2013.

666 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
82%
World History

The state average for World History was 46% in 2013.

675 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 10% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
5%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Algebra II

The state average for Algebra II was 15% in 2013.

66 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
8%

2011

 
 
25%

2010

 
 
13%
Biology/Life Sciences

The state average for Biology/Life Sciences was 51% in 2013.

168 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
62%
Chemistry

The state average for Chemistry was 32% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
38%
Earth Science

The state average for Earth Science was 37% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
46%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 48% in 2013.

568 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
74%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 8% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
0%

2012

 
 
5%

2011

 
 
7%

2010

 
 
0%
High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

The state average for High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11) was 49% in 2013.

440 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
66%
Physics

The state average for Physics was 58% in 2013.

186 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
82%
U.S. History

The state average for U.S. History was 50% in 2013.

577 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
71%
World History

The state average for World History was 19% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students20%
Females20%
Males20%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino12%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)23%
Economically disadvantaged8%
Non-economically disadvantaged22%
Students with disability8%
Students with no reported disability23%
English learner24%
Fluent-English proficient and English only19%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented30%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)15%
Parent education - college graduate11%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate34%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Algebra II

All Students95%
Females97%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Biology/Life Sciences

All Students91%
Females92%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino83%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged87%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disability50%
Students with no reported disability92%
English learner42%
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)87%
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to state69%

Earth Science

All Students49%
Females41%
Males55%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disability30%
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner17%
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented50%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)40%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females91%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disability54%
Students with no reported disability90%
English learner21%
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented97%
Parent education - not a high school graduate55%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)78%
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to state65%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students13%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only17%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Students70%
Females67%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino49%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented81%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate76%
Parent education - declined to state82%

Integrated/Coordinated Science I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Physics

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

World History

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students8%
Females14%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)0%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged13%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability10%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only9%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Algebra II

All Students51%
Females47%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asian77%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)43%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only52%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented78%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduate39%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to state64%

Biology/Life Sciences

All Students56%
Females62%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino31%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disability18%
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner15%
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)46%
Parent education - college graduate38%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to state47%

Chemistry

All Students79%
Females75%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to state77%

Earth Science

All Students39%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females87%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disability48%
Students with no reported disability88%
English learner27%
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented99%
Parent education - not a high school graduate55%
Parent education - high school graduate38%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to state90%

Geometry

All Students24%
Females30%
Males18%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)21%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged27%
Students with disability7%
Students with no reported disability28%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only23%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate10%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate37%
Parent education - declined to state27%

High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

All Students96%
Females93%
Males98%
African Americann/a
Asian98%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate99%
Parent education - declined to state100%

Science

All Students89%
Females89%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino70%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged66%
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disability49%
Students with no reported disability91%
English learner39%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented99%
Parent education - not a high school graduate64%
Parent education - high school graduate62%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)79%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to state90%

World History

All Students75%
Females71%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asian89%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disability27%
Students with no reported disability79%
English learner27%
Fluent-English proficient and English only77%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduate29%
Parent education - high school graduate43%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to state76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Algebra II

All Students12%
Females7%
Males16%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino0%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)12%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged12%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability13%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only9%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate25%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate7%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Biology/Life Sciences

All Students85%
Females88%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented99%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Chemistry

All Students50%
Females59%
Males42%
African Americann/a
Asian85%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)39%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented83%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate46%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate53%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Earth Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females81%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disability33%
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner20%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented97%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate56%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Students0%
Females0%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged0%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability0%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only0%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

High School (Summative) Mathematics (Grade 9-11)

All Students66%
Females63%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asian83%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented87%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate74%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Physics

All Students84%
Females73%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino79%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

U.S. History

All Students71%
Females67%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian84%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disability27%
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner19%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)56%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

World History

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 83% in 2013.

692 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Math

The state average for Math was 84% in 2013.

693 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to test high school students' skills in English language arts and mathematics. The results for grade 10 students taking the test for the first time are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The CAHSEE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of California. Students must pass all parts of the CAHSEE in order to graduate from high school. If they do not pass it the first time, students have multiple opportunities to retake the test. The goal is for all students to pass both sections of the test.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Females98%
Males97%
Gender Unknownn/a
African Americann/a
Asian98%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino92%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Declined to staten/a
Economically disadvantaged90%
Non-economically disadvantaged98%
Economic Status Unknown97%
Students with disability80%
Tested with modificationsn/a
English learner79%
Language Fluency Unknownn/a
Migrant educationn/a

Math

All Students97%
Females97%
Males98%
Gender Unknownn/a
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino91%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Declined to staten/a
Economically disadvantaged90%
Non-economically disadvantaged98%
Economic Status Unknown99%
Students with disability81%
Tested with modificationsn/a
English learner86%
Language Fluency Unknownn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) to test high school students' skills in English language arts and mathematics. The results for grade 10 students taking the test for the first time are displayed on GreatSchools profiles. The CAHSEE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined by the state of California. Students must pass all parts of the CAHSEE in order to graduate from high school. If they do not pass it the first time, students have multiple opportunities to retake the test. The goal is for all students to pass both sections of the test.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 60% 26%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 27% 11%
Hispanic 11% 52%
Black 1% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 4%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 10%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
College counselor(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
Dance teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Tutor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
  • Theory
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
  • Video / Film production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
  • Kitchen
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • David Jaffe
Fax number
  • (760) 481-0098

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Dance teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
  • Tutor(s)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • College/career center
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Music room
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Tennis
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Diving
  • Golf
  • Gymnastics
  • Lacrosse
  • Volleyball
  • Water polo

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Photography
Music
  • Band
  • Jazz band
  • Orchestra
  • Theory
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Graphics
  • Technical design and production
  • Video / Film production
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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3710 Del Mar Heights Road
San Diego, CA 92130
Phone: (858) 755-0125

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