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GreatSchools Rating

Foster Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 412 students

Foster is a family friendly school.
 
 

 

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Living in San Diego

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $336,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,650.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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23 reviews of this school


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Posted June 20, 2014

My school is definetly not awesome.this little girl I hate her.her brother is like really nice but she is not.she told me I was a high pitched singer at the talent show .the teacher didn't care at all.the food is gross.


Posted August 22, 2013

I like this school. It doesn't look special when you drive by on Zion Ave., but when you turn the corner you see a large grass lawn, trees, fresh paint, and the campus is clean and peaceful. The kindergarden playground is separate and sweet. Don't expect to see many LV bags or designer jeans. The community here is casual and low key. There are many excellent teachers that LOVE their job and make a difference in your child's enthusiasm for learning. There are a couple that just stick to the basics of teaching. The main problem with this school is lack of parental involvement. There lacks a sense of pride here. What Foster needs is parents to care, get involved and kick butt!! Revamp Fosters reputation!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2013

My kid loves this school her teachers is very good, they have science lab weekly for the kindergarten, when my kid jump from bed at 6 am to go to school this means she is happy to attend this school and as a mother I see this is the key which will help her to be successful academically too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2011

My child went to this school and let me say that this school needs help in many areas .One good thing is the staff and Principal Downey who deserves credit for trying to clean up this school The students are very mean. This school has a good science program as well and music but no P.E.. So before you pick Foster just know that they are working on this school and Mr.Downey is amazing principal who knows everyone by heart.


Posted October 7, 2009

Foster teacher and faculty care. They are very active about the children academic growth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 1, 2009

Having moved from a private school to Marvin, then from Marvin to here, I was nervous. But I the staff went out of their way to help us transition. I'm particularly impressed with Principal Downey, who is absolutely hands-on and who remembers everyone's names. Discipline here is great; kids are well-behaved. Plus- gasp- they actually say the pledge! I was particularly impressed when, on the first day we were there, they got my son into speech therapy, which no one had brought up at Marvin. My daughter is in the gifted program and while she likes her classmates and her teacher, she is not challenged. Parental involvement is high; there were too many volunteers at the Fall Festival . Parents are welcoming. I'm not worried about test scores; the tests are not hard and if you have reasonably capable kids and are an involved parent, your kid will score well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2008

So far, not so good. We just moved to SD from Poway. Seeing the test scores made me a little apprihensive, But after reading the reviews about the new principle and talking with one of the Kinder teachers, I thought scores arn't always everything so I would give it shot with an open mind. Well - I have seen with my own eyes that some of thier choices for teachers are NOT, in my opinion the best. I am actually really disapointed. Also, they seem like a school that is just a puppet to the district. There is just this feeling of 'stress that seems to linger' that they have absolutely no freedom to be creative and positive. Like someone has handed them a text book for teaching and you must follow it every step of the way - regardless of how the children feel. As if they are robots.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 24, 2008

This school is ok but not great. Academically my child did good but the expectations in his class were low and I think he could have been challenged more... There were not many school activities and not much parental involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 8, 2008

Foster is a great school. I have sent 2 children through fifth grade. This is not my neighborhood school. I choice in from a more affluent community. Education should not be about snobbishness and elitism. Foster offers a educationally sound, culturally, racially and socially economically diverse educational experience for my children. I believe that many of the parents who opt out of Foster do so because of thier own issues about status and not thier child's best interest.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2008

Guess what, the whole attitude of the San Diego Unified School District is, 'if you don't like it, choice out.' Let's also remember that this policy was begun due to parental pressure on the school board to do so. In essence, we got what we asked for as a community. This is not unique to Foster. The other schools in the area have kids that are choiced in from out of the area, too. That being said, we are very happy with Foster; the teacher's are fantastic, and our son is getting a great education. We have no reservations about starting our younger son there, too, in another year. Kudos to the school administration for turning Foster around over the last 2+ years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2008

This is my sons neighborhood school but now I understand why so many kids in Allied Gardens don't go to this school. Only 3 of the kids in his class live in the community so it's hard to develop friendships and there is very little parental involvent. Also in my sons class the kids have to sit at round tables and don't have there own desk or personal space --it's very distracting and I notice the kids have a hard time completing their assignments and spend lots of time talking and goofing off. I will be sending my child to a different school next year---it's unfortunate because it is our neighborhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2008

I agree, out of all the children in my daughters classroom, 7 live in the boundry lines of Foster. And as you can tell by recent postings, there is absolutely no concern at all about working to keep local kids in the school. Our contention with Foster is the attitude, if you don't like it, 'choice out then'. So, as more and more kids choice out, scores continue to decline. It's unfortunate, but real. In response to just sending kids to school to learn and not build relationships, I disagree. Learning has as much to do with academics as with building friendships and being a part of a supportive community. A successful school is well rounded, both academically and socially. So until the school and the community come together to make Foster a better school, it will only be average.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2008

With the new principle at Foster Elementary School I have seen dramatic changes in our school. The care and concern for our children is more than evident. From the principle to the Vice-principle and teachers. The PTA at Foster is small and has a lot of heart. The lack of parent involvement is not because of the diverse population in our school it is because of divicive parents who are more concerned about their own personal desires instead of what will be best for all of the children in the school. Still, our small PTA trudges on with every single person doing more than they can really handle. What would make Foster the greatest school in San Diego would be if the parents who spend their time campaigning against progess would help or choice out themselves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 3, 2008

I think Foster is a wonderful school. It's true that there are a lot of 'out of area' children, but I think this adds to the school, not detracts from it. I think it creates a more diverse and enriching community. Added to which, children should be sent to school to learn, not to build neighborhood friendships. It's true that the PTA does a lot of fundraising, but every penny is put back into the school. For every fundraiser, they provide at least three services. In fact, they provide over $30,000 worth of improvements. Yes, there is a lot of fundraising, but you can't very well improve a school without money. It seems to me that if the teachers are good, the classes are small, and the school is clean and safe, the school deserves five stars. If my child's school were 'below average', you can bet we would choice out!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 21, 2008

We are very disappointed. The majority of local neighborhood kids 'choice' into other schools in the area. Therefore, a large number of student body is made up of out of area children. Now, my complaint isn't the out of area kids, because they are good kids. It's the fact that there is no sense of community at the school or in the neighborhood, which in turn does not create an environment in which kids can build lasting neighborhood friendships. Also, I feel the PTA is more about fund raising and less about improving the school. The board members are unfriendly and disorganized. Now, on the positive side, the teachers are extremely seasoned and run a very orderly campus. Class sizes are small & the school is clean & safe. Overall, we won't choice out of the school, but, we are moving at the end of the year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2007

Kudos to our Principal, Teachers and Staff. The positive attitude at our school has improved greatly in the last year. We have a new principal to thank for the change. My daughters love going to school every day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2007

I am very happy with the quality of teachers at Foster Elementary. I have two children that go there currently. We have been at Foster for the last 4 years. We finally have a great Principal and things are going much smoother than the past years. The teachers are the glue that hold the school together!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2006

My daughter has been attending foster elementary school since kindergarten and she is now entering the fourth grade gate class. Her teachers every year has been very wonderful and caring. Parent involvement is wonderful. The down fall of this school is the lack of extra curriculars and activities. Also, I have seen many principal come and go over the past 4 years now. They need to have a stable and reliable prinicipal.It not only affects the children but us as parents as well. One thing my daughter did not like was that the lunch times are very short and rushed. By the time they get on those long lines, sit and eat there lunch, the bell ring and they have no time to play and get some exercise. The school would be better if they extend there lunch times, add more P.E classes and last but not least extra curriculars.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 12, 2006

My son is in kindergarten and I love his teacher. She is understanding of his needs and she cares about all of her students. I hope he is blessed next year like he has been this year. He loves going to the school library and having PE each week. He is always coming home saying 'Mom, did you know...?' My son has come such a long way from being the shy, quiet kid we all knew at the beginning of the year. I am confident he will do well in the coming years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2006

Our five year old attend kindergarten at Foster Elementary and we are very pleased with the experience thus far. The teacher is caring, and the community support and involvement is wonderful. There is at least one parent volunteer in the classroom each day of the week. There are extracurriculur activities in sports, and dance (and I believe music for the older students), and we also receive information of community activities offered.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

823

Change from
2012 to 2013

-20

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

823

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-20

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
71%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
65%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

46 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

69 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
38%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

68 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
61%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females73%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learner67%
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)58%
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students63%
Females68%
Males58%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino66%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)62%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learner78%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate65%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students41%
Females50%
Males30%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)27%
Economically disadvantaged40%
Non-economically disadvantaged44%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability42%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented74%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate21%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students68%
Females76%
Males56%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learner67%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate36%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)86%
Parent education - college graduate72%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females62%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students67%
Females57%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino57%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students56%
Females49%
Males66%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino44%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learner27%
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented67%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students50%
Females44%
Males60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino39%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged39%
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learner18%
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented60%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students61%
Females53%
Males72%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learner27%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented71%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)52%
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 36% 52%
White 35% 26%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 10% 11%
Black 9% 6%
Two or more races 8% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 11%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students School psychologist
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by school staff None
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Language learning

Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 7:30 am
School end time
  • 2:10 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 6:00 a.m.
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Karla Shiminski
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • No
Fax number
  • (619) 583-6812

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Core knowledge
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Standards-based
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • None
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • Spanish
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Foreign languages taught
  • None
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • School psychologist
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • None
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Counseling
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
School facilities
  • Computer lab
  • Internet access
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
Partnerships with local resources and organizations
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • None
Music
  • None
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Student council/government
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school does not have a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
School leaders can update this information here.

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Elementary school


 
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6550 51st Street
San Diego, CA 92120
Website: Click here
Phone: (619) 582-2728

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