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Language Academy

Public | K-8 | 1000 students

 

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Living in San Diego

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $235,800. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,200.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 9 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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45 reviews of this school


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Posted August 15, 2014

I know everyone has their opinions but I've been a room mom for years and I get very involved in the school programs and issues. That said, as a room mom I got to say, yeah the principal is not at all easy to work with, she feels like she does not have to involve parents in anything but that one negative thing should not affect the amazing teachers and programs that this school has. To those parents who can not give a clear answer to what is going on in their students lives at school, become involve! Visit the class, join a club with your student, be there and participate. Get off the he said she said and actually experience things for yourself. I love this school and I am very passionate about it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2014

Don't go here! The teachers scare the students, Bathrooms aren't clean, sooo much freedom so they're not strict enough Even parents are suspicious of the teachers because of What their kids say


Posted April 7, 2014

This school has recently gotten new leadership and needed it. Arce is perhaps not the best PR administrator, but really is passionate about education. She has turned some parents off, but that was because communicating with them and selling them on her decisions was not her top priority. Her priority is the kids and working to better the quality of their education at our school. She has done an amazing amount in just one year and I look forward to seeing what she will be able to do as long as we are lucky enough to have her.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2014

The new parking lot, parent pick-up zone and landscaping is another fantastic addition to the infrastructure of an already academically and culturally rich school. This coincides with development that is going on in the SDSU area in general that will make this neighborhood an even more interesting place to live. A previous reviewer mentioned that recent changes here represent a turnaround at a "failing" school. However, the school has been "failing" only in the sense that it hasn't met targets for its subgroups in standardized tests; tests that have finally become discredited and done away with by the State, by the way. The CSTs have always been a poor measure of true learning and won't even be given this year in most grades. Even so, LA's overall API has consistently been above 800, which is the state target, and its subgroups that haven't met the target (and traditionally don't do so statewide) are very close to the target of 800. But to label a school "failing" for this is ridiculous. I have two children at this school and for me, at least, the fact that they have been learning both English and their mother's native language in school is an amazing success.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 16, 2013

The new principal arrived last year and inherited the HUGE burden of turning around a school that has been failing for the past years. She is up to the task! Her management style may not be of the liking of some (angry parents always complaining but offering no solution to help) but she is the leader the school needed so bad to get better. Over the course of one school year, she has put in place a few modifications that are certainly efficient, for the benefit of the kids and the teachers alike. The school looks better, is better and, finally got equipped with books in French for the French program. The task to be accomplished is still huge, but I am pretty confident things are going to get better and better thanks to the leadership of a principal who believes in quality education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2013

Don't expect much from the principal, it seems like she is not in the best willingness to help either parents or children. When asked for help, it is hard to get an appointment with her but when one finally can meet, she has a negative response. It is unfortunate to have her as the principal because most of the teachers are awesome!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 8, 2013

I think the concept of learning a second language is great. Communication with th principal and her secretary leave a lot to be desired. She is lax in communicating with students as well as parents. The school does need to upgrade its use of technology. There is a lot of technology available but the teachers do not take advantage of it.


Posted August 22, 2013

At first I thought that this was the biggest mistake that I made for my child. The students have to take an assessment test to see if they are ready for school and knowledgeable, apparently some students are overlooked at because you can tell that they are not ready for school or they have special needs. The principal is new and a headache to try to deal with, you never get an appointment with her and she makes the most stupidest decisions, we are hoping she gets her act together soon. I am happy that the old rooms are being upgraded, AC is needed badly during the summer. My child loved coming to this school, this isn't the first school we have attended or looked at but knowing how much the teachers care and try their best is an amazing feeling to have. I recommend the school, take a tour and ask the parents/students questions and you will see that it's a great choice in the end.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

You can't ask for better language results in the first three yrs that they are in this school than somewhere else. The educational program is different from other language schools but this one is a challenging one that in the end your kids will surprise you on how much they can absorb in their little heads.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Only 10 classrooms and the office are original. The library and 8 room middle school opened in 2006 from Prop MM. In 2011, the $1.1 M Joint Use Sports Field was opened and 6 conditioned bungalows were added. The 2013 school year will open with a 14 room elementary building and two additional middle school classrooms, (all with air conditioning) from Prop S. 2014 will bring a new and improved drop-off/pick-up parking lot. My eldest was well prepared for high school. . My only complaint is the restriction of parking on neighborhood streets during school events due to residents with permits only. My children have done well at this school academically. We are looking forward to several more years at this school. I think the K-8 experience is a great one
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2013

We started here in the fall of 2012 and came from a dual-language program at a neighborhood school in another state. My students are in 3rd and K in Spanish. I have been very impressed with the teaching method compared to our old school. It is a natural language acquisition process and my kinder student sings songs in Spanish all the time at home (and we speak only English). The principal is new this year, very experienced, and is focused on a collaborative effort between the administration and the parents. The school facility is old and run-down, but there is a gorgeous, new building (construction now) opening in the fall. All of the parents I've met who are actually involved at school are wonderful and dedicated. We are very happy so far and love our children's teachers. They are experienced and very caring. Cons? No parking, so drop-off and pick-up are a challenge. I expected more more parent involvement with a school of this size. Very limited enrollment, so difficult to get in (lottery). Coming from in or out of state, you must get in to the lottery before February for fall enrollment. Parent sentiment (see other reviews) seem to be based on individual classroom teachers).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2013

My experience with this school was very disappointing. My daughter started kindergarten this year and became very unhappy within 6 weeks. Thankfully, I was volunteering in the classroom and could see, hear, and feel the negative atmosphere and dangerous situation. While my daughter was asking, not to move to another class, but to switch schools, and I was considering it, she was next on the waiting list at a charter school when a spot opened up. She switched after 2 months. Volunteering at the new school has made even more obvious the stark contrasts between schools. I had thought, maybe this is just how schools around here are--physically depressing, sour in mood, uncaring, but no one should have to put up with that. For the diligent students, including mine, the academics are great. She learned a lot but could have learned more in a positive environment without the distracting kids for whom this is not the right program and who frequently act up without being dealt with effectively by the school. This school has some systemic problems that, hopefully, will be dealth with by the new principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 2, 2013

My experience at this school was amazing! As a graduate from Language Academy class of 2011, I wanted to share my thoughts on the school. The school has an amazing environment, from the location to the teachers, students, and entire staff. Your child gets to go to a school, where at the beginning they start off in a class full of little strangers and come out as a family! The school is absolutely unique, as a child going to that school and learning another language is a normal thing but to other kids at other schools its cool, but we don't tend to realize this until were older because its what we're used to. And its also a good school to challenge your child with, because it's going to be hard but they'll learn to manage, and once they hit eighth grade and have to do their exhibition, they'll be nervous but they'll also be very thankful for later on in their high school or college educations. I loved and still love this school and all the staff, and I recommend it to everyone that wants their child to grow up and learn in an amazing environment!


Posted November 2, 2012

Not impressed with this school at all. My daughter started kindergarten this year and we were so excited. Two weeks into the program I saw a things in the classroom that should not be happening. The interim principle was dismissive of me and the other parents. I changed classrooms and another mom just pulled her kid. There is a history of parents raising concerns and they are dismissed and not taken seriously. The school is designed to protect the teachers. If you do decide to go to this school, make sure you can volunteer to know what is going on in your child's classroom. You are the only advocate your child has because the system is not designed to protect the children but to make sure they continue to pull in money. Once again. . . not impressed by this school at all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2012

This school is still making so much progress and growth! I have a student in middle school and another in elementary. They are both learning so much! Especially the younger one, who has benefitted from the great new leadership since 2008 and more and more stable staff. We can't wait until we get back from winter break and they get to use the brand new joint-use field! It also helps loads that the coaches have begun all-new sports programs after school and there are also many after-school activities to choose from on minimum days. It is amazing to see what hard workers the teachers are and how many of them work together. I'd say about 92% of the teachers there ROCK! Just ask around and you'll know who to avoid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2011

I have a third grader and seventh grader, both in the French program. I love this school. The french program is excellent--both my children are fluent in the language. I love that the school is K-8 and mimics a private school environment. The teachers and staff are wonderful--especially the principal. I highly recommend sending your children there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 12, 2011

Teachers and staff are amazing. Very involved parent community. The kids are not ONLY learning to speak in another language but they are learning to do so in a diverse and multicutural environment. That is something that will serve them well in their futures in the "real world". I took my kids to France last year (3rd and 5th grade) and the locals constantly complimented them on their accent as well as their fluency. They were thrilled that their French was far better than their mother's who only learned hers in college. The school is a tight knit community, with students, staff and parents supportive of one another. I have been really happy with my experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2011

My boy is in the second grade and he's French is tr s magnifique. The reviews posted here are old. We got a solid principal in 2007 and she's been great at caring for our school, students and teachers. Look at the ATI Rating and remember that these kids are learning in a foreign language when they take that test. TAKE A TOUR, decide for yourself. Consider how awful the transition to middle school is, then think about your child going to MS with the same friends and teachers he's known since kindergarten. Enrich your child's future with a language or two!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2010

Our child is beginning his second year at the Language Academy. The curriculum reflects the second language in meaningful ways and has brought many opportunities for our child to be exposed to another culture. We have been very pleased with the quality of teachers and the attention given to both language acquisition and literacy. This is a great school for self-motivated students who are ready to challenge themselves. We are very pleased that San Diego Unifies offers the option to learn a second language at such a young age. We appreciate the forward thinking parents and educators who established the Language Academy so that our child has this opportunity to gain this skill.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2010

Not impressed! After one year in kindergarten my child (very bright) can hardly identify or read a few Spanish words. I didn't expect miracles, but I anticipated more than this. Communication with teacher has been awful. Nice lady, but I suspect she gravitates toward the primary Spanish speakers in the class. Teacher reported my child did great on test. My child admitted she was lost and the other students helped her with test! Beware of Bus!! The bus has all ages and many are of questionable character and cause trouble. There is no proper supervision - any number of things can happen between there and home. District allows 5 year old to be dropped off ALONE on street if bus is early or you are late!!!!! My child's day (including bus ride is 8 am - 5pm - too long for a kindergartener and too long on bus.)
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2012.

This school's
API score

852

Change from
2011 to 2012

-10

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2012

This school's
API score

852

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2011 to 2012

-10

Change from 2011 to 2012
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
62%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
75%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
29%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
62%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
29%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
40%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Hispanic 51%
White 23%
Black 14%
Two or more races 8%
Asian 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 48%N/AN/A
English language learners 25%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 2%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:55am
School end time
  • 3:35pm
School Leader's name
  • Cynthia Garrison-Arce
Special schedule
  • Year-round
Fax number
  • (619) 582-1769

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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4961 64th Street
San Diego, CA 92115
Website: Click here
Phone: (619) 287-1182

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