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GreatSchools Rating

Spreckels Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 813 students

We are a Spanish Bi-lingual Magnet

 
 

Living in San Diego

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $277,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,860.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
Based on 7 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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104 reviews of this school


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Posted June 22, 2014

We had a great first year at Spreckels. My son's kindergarten teacher was wonderful. As a teacher myself, I'm amazed at how much reading he is doing after a year here. This was our neighborhood school and some of our neighbors had told us to choice into a another neighboring school. So glad we didn't as we loved it! We liked that this school has a diversity of cultures and socio-economic backgrounds as we want our son to be grounded. We found the other parents to be involved. Do wish the Spanish program was a little more developed as others have noted. I was also surprised by how little time they had for art but wow, I was impressed by their music/dancing program. Obviously I realize that a teacher can make or break your school year so I'm hoping that he gets more good ones.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2014

So saddened by the events that took place in my daughter's kindergarten class this year. We choiced into this school because we had heard good things and we wanted our daughter to receive a bilingual education. The issues started day one when the class she was in originally was changed and the teacher had no knowledge of our daughter being in her class. As the year progressed the problems increased. There was limited supervision at lunch, children were left on the playground without teacher supervision as the teacher was late, my daughter had snacks and parts of her lunch stolen, She was spit on and things were stolen from her backpack. There were about 12 different substitute teachers in and out of the class, no joke. My daughter's class had multiple children that had behavior issues and the class was contstantly in chaos and being yelled at. My daughter was constantly stressed. It took almost 2 weeks, emails and visits to the office to get and appt with the principal who offered no solutions to the problem until multiple parents complained and the district was notified. The final straw for us, the teacher was removed from the class in the last 6 wks of school. Very disappointed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2013

To the Parent who posted yesterday's comment. Your facts are just not accurate and you should get them straight before making such a public comment. It is absolutely false and reckless for you to say "Many, if not most of the kids are bussed in from far-away disadvantaged neighborhoods". Spreckels' enrollment numbers have dwindled over the past 2 years because, in fact, the number of busses have been decreased by approximately 150%. We have less kids today than we did 2 years ago, because over a hundred kids who were getting bussed in no longer have that option. I'll refrain from commenting on your ignorant referral to a group of partents as "this cohort". I actually agree with your assessment of the Spanish language program but unfortunately your good points are lost with your inaccurate, overbroad, and frankly offensive comments.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 30, 2013

My child attended the Seminar program at this school, which seems to have been placed at this school only to bring up the dismal performance of the broader school population. The Seminar program was, in itself, great. However..... Many, if not most of the kids are bussed in from far-away, disadvantaged neighborhoods, with little parental school involvement by this cohort. The Spanish language focus is a sham - weekly Spanish lessons, our kid was never tested for Spanish proficiency, no grade was issued, and, as far as we can see, little was learned. Frankly, this school should be closed, and the local population folded into Curie, to create a true community school. The money that is now spent bussing kids all the way across town should be spent on their education in a school closer to their homes, not spent on bus drivers, gasoline and buses.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2013

Absolutely love this school. I have a Kindergartener and a 2nd grader and both have excelled in their academics since starting here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2013

I choiced my son into Spreckels because it used to have a wonderful reputation, that is not the case anymore. I know countless families who have decided to leave and we are one of them. They call the school a Bilingual Magnet but my son learned more Spanish from Sesame Street- he got a 1/2 hour of Spanish once a week. This is the case for older grades too. My son was here for K & 1st grade, in both years his teachers left & new ones started. The new 1st grade teacher was brand new, never taught alone before & was completely overwhelmed. She had many students who had behavioral & learning issues. Many parents in the class asked the principal & administration for help, but we were ignored. The principal NEVER returned our calls, emails and letters. She told one parent from our class that this school year "would be a "wash" for us, some years are good & some bad". She did NOTHING to help our teacher. Safety is also an issue, two drunk men walked right into the front gate & walked into classrooms. The school went on lockdown for an 90 mins but parents were not notified. Our kids told us when we picked them up. Main gate is open & not monitored, it cannot be seen from the front office.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 8, 2013

We transfer into this school every year. I love the curriculum, the parent support, teachers and staff. Most of all the children are very supportive of each other. You dont see the clickiness and competetiveness which makes for a very supportive and safe enviroment
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 1, 2013

This school is excellent. We bought our house in this neighborhood because o f Spreckels. Teachers each of the first two years have been great. A little disappointed in that I thought there would be more Spanish taught. The Spanish portion of the day seems to be very short. Overall very pleased.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 18, 2013

I am a parent of two children who attended Spreckels. To rate a school, there are 3 criteria: the teaching, the administration, and the cliental. The teaching staff is above average. They are all hard working teachers with the children's best interest at heart. The administration needs to make changes to be more student oriented and improve communication. The cliental is average. If a child is getting into trouble at school, don't blame the teacher. The teacher is just the messenger; it is the parents' job to reinforce behavior consequences at home.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 24, 2012

I attended this school a few years ago and all I can remember is how they separated the Spanish speaking students from English speaking students based on ethnicity. It did not matter if the student spoke both languages if they had a Hispanic name they would be put in a Spanish class. Spanish classes did not get to do the same activities. They were not allowed to participate in science experiments, computer lab and extra curricular activities. Kids were bullied and no one did anything about it. They didn't seem to care if students needed extra help and made no effort to include everyone. Teachers have favorites and make that very clear. I would not put my child in this school.


Posted June 5, 2012

My son went to Spreckles for K and 1st grade. A few days after he started kindergarten he asked me why his teacher didn't like him ( he had never asked that question about an adult before or since). She had issues with teaching and she approached me one day to inform me that "she was out of tools" !! My son was 4!! Though his 1st grade teacher was far better she was often stressed, undoubtably from trying to teach in a poorly run school. Which brings us to the Principal and VP. These two were the source of the poorly run school. The short time I would be there to drop off in the AM was stressful even on me, the kids were corralled in small spaces not allowed to run, play or use the playground. Teachers often resorted to yelling and blowing whistles at the kids. Parents were forced to drop their kids off on the street instead of the lot which was off limits. My son is now in a new school he has completed 2nd and 3rd grades there and he has flourished. He has the support and dedicated staff to provide a A+ education and yes, its a public school! Don't be fooled by some of the reviews here.. go see for yourself. I do feel the parents want to do well but are limited. We got out!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2012

My 1st-grader has had an awesome year at Spreckels. Her teacher, Mrs. Gomez-Neri, has been a wonderful fit for her. She is consistent and firm, but still full of love for the kids. She works hard to tailor the lessons to each child's ability. I am very involved with the PTA, and find the parent community very strong. There are so many involved, dedicated parents on campus (and from home) every day, consistently going above and beyond to make this school great by providing enhanced art education, campus garden activities, a variety of affordable after-school programs, and fun & meaningful fundraisers. We have heard great things about the 2nd grade teachers and are looking forward to another great year next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2012

I have two children at Spreckels. My husband and I have always been involved with PTA, School Site Committee, general volunteering and as room parent. The principal, Dr. Fernandez, is great to work with, I can always find her and talk to her face-to-face about any issue or question I have. The teachers my kids have had are creative, flexible, and intelligent. My son's teacher, Ms. Sparks, gives him more challenging math when necessary. Last year, his teacher, Ms. Nordlow, made sure he was in the proper reading group and his reading dramatically improved with help and advice from his teachers (Mrs. Stevens, Ms. Nava, Ms. Sparks). Our PTA is super-active and provides the school with money for all sorts of things including field trips, Earth Day, Running Club, Garden Club, Assemblies, and a new art program. My son has drama, my daughter has dance and they love it! The school also provides music and computers on top of the Spanish language classes. I feel we are so lucky to send our kids to a school with such a broad range of classes and activities. I wish that parents who complain would spend more time getting involved; the more you put in, the more you get back.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2012

This school is much too large and the administration is not equipped (nor do they seem willing) to deal with the behavioral and discipline issues. From day 1 the Principal has been a huge disappointment. Her communication skills are subpar. I have stuck it out with my kids, but many of their friends from kindergarten are all going to other schools now. The stories I hear from my children regarding lack of supervision at lunch and recess and the bullying and violent behavior that occurs are heartbreaking. My son was threatened with violence by a boy who insisted he give him his lunch PIN number. If he had given me the other boy's name, I would have called immediately. Sadly, though, I don't believe anything would have been done about it. If you have another option, take it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2012

I am a parent of two boys at Spreckels. One is in Kindergarten and one is in second grade. This is the third year my older son has been there. I love this school and have been so impressed by the teachers (Mrs. Alessio, Mrs. Gomez Neri and Mrs. Boyd are fantastic. So are the others - but these are who my sons had). I am delighed by the quality of instruction, the activities, and the parent involvement at this school. Our kids go on field trips almost every month, they learn Spanish, they have music, art, science, and have a "Power Hour" for reading where they are grouped with kids from different classes in their same reading level . There is a very active PTA and volunteer community. Like all public schools, they could use more money and community support, but they thrive with what they have. I feel that some of the negative complaints on this board about the principal are unfair - she was at the mercy of the San Diego Unified District which kept changing class size and number of teachers at the beginning of the year. She did her best with a bad situation that she could not control.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 5, 2012

Repost: First deleted?!! Communication between teachers, administration and parents is terrible. Of course there are good teachers and bad teacher at every school but the problems we've encountered seem to be from the top down. On several occasions significant events regarding our children have not been communicated. More than once when we have had an obligation that require our child miss school, the school did not even call us to tell us they were absent! If something had happened to my child on the way to school we would not know that they were missing until we went to pick them up in the afternoon! This school is not run like a tight ship. We feel like the last two years have killed our child's enthusiasm to learn. The staff means well but they really can't see what they are missing. We thought maybe we were being overcritical judging them based on our child's previous school but our dissatisfaction was confirmed. Spreckels has failed to meet "No child left behind" federal standards for 3 consecutive years! They are on PROBATION! That combined with the "blue collar" classroom environment and mentality is a HUGE disappointment. Even parent volunteers can't fix that!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2011

The principal is a "run-and-hide" from critical school management issues. The class sizes were too large at the start of this school year; yet she chose to ignore the problem until late October. Now, parents are angry and students are upset to be moved around just when they were getting used to their classes. This principal will not make decisions when they need to be made; choosing to ignore problems until they become crises. Finally, she expects teachers to "cover" her mistakes. If she was managing a company she would have been GONE long ago.


Posted November 1, 2011

I attended this school when I was a child, for the 6th grade only. Because I had a Spanish last name, I was put into a classroom with bilingual children and a bilingual teacher. I felt very isolated and out of place. I also felt discriminated against because I was Caucasian. I was a shy child, and the teacher would often humiliate me when I got any kind of answer wrong. It was the most miserable year in a school I had ever had. Now, things may have changed since then, this was about 20 years ago. I can only hope that things have improved.


Posted October 26, 2011

I think the teachers at this school ought to be commended. Their hearts are in the right place and they are making a difference. The principal is another story, though. She is unavailable and also unprofessional in her communications about (and with) the parents - especially when she is trying to cover up mistakes she has made. She has her eye on the money, though. The school is a magnet school for bilingual education - so if you are not latino and are from the neighborhood - you can expect very little of her attention.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 13, 2011

There is heavy spamming by the union to try to boost ratings for this school. Come and see for yourself what a mess it is.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

871

Change from
2012 to 2013

-11

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

871

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-11

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
64%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
58%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

140 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
79%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

139 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
75%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
65%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females67%
Males60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino49%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disability23%
Students with no reported disability68%
English learner44%
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented89%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate47%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students69%
Females70%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino57%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disability38%
Students with no reported disability73%
English learner41%
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)72%
Parent education - college graduate70%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females61%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino37%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner37%
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)28%
Parent education - college graduate68%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to state54%

Math

All Students75%
Females71%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learner47%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduate84%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to state65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students80%
Females76%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learner47%
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate38%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students78%
Females70%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged61%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learner41%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented90%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate44%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females76%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino63%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner28%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate53%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate84%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students69%
Females62%
Males78%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged43%
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learner36%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate35%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate85%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students74%
Females74%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learner24%
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate24%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 45% 52%
White 39% 26%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 8% 11%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Black 3% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 45%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Librarian/media specialist(s)
PE instructor(s)
Nurse(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students

Language learning

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Foreign languages
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered
  • Spanish
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 9:05 am
School end time
  • 3:35 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 6:00 a.m.
  • After school: ends at 6:00 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Cecilia Fernandez
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (858) 546-1269

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Core knowledge
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Spanish Bi-lingual Magnet
  • Standards-based
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Foreign languages
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • Spanish
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Languages supported by ESL/ELL programs
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Counseling
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • None
Music
  • None
Performing arts
  • None
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Garden Club
  • Running Club
  • Safety Patrol
  • Student council/government
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school does not have a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

6033 Stadium Street
San Diego, CA 92122
Website: Click here
Phone: (858) 453-5377

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