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GreatSchools Rating

Lilienthal (Claire) Elementary School

Public | K-8 | 674 students

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 6 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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31 reviews of this school


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Posted November 17, 2013

Claire Lilienthal has become part of our family for the past 10 years. The teachers and administration have both challenged and loved my children every day. No wonder it is the best school in San Francisco and one of the best in the state of California. We love Lilienthal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2013

I used to go to CL and i transfered to a private school which i absolutely love. This school has terrible teachers and is mostly for students that fall behind.


Posted December 5, 2012

It's true if you have a typical kid you might be A. O.K. but if your kid excels in a particular discipline, good luck getting any instruction targeted to your kid's ability. The principal seems to have mastered every way to say "your on your own" without ever saying so. Also and in the mean time be ready to empty your pockets with this, that, and the other thing, but not instruction to your or any advanced kid. Pitiful. Teachers seem good natured and generally agreeable but for the most part their hands are tied to CLA's that shoot toward advancing API scores directed by the Principal and Vice that keep your curious kid from shooting for the stars. Unfortunate and disappointing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 27, 2012

This is an amazing school! Our daughter started kindergarten this fall and has been challenged and happy. She's progressing rapidly in her skills relative to preschool. Our teacher is very talented and committed, emails us all the time. Lots of opportunity for parent involvement which we have been able to take advantage of. Also, we enrolled 3 days in the after school program, CLASP, which our daughter LOVES! All of the parents I have met are highly enthusiastic about the school and committed to supporting it. Claire Lilienthal is a wonderful, wonderful place!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2012

This is a great school if you don t care if your kids learn anything. I have two kids in the school and last year they stopped teaching the minute they completed the standardized test. My daughter s class watched a Disney film while my son s class went bowling. Again at the beginning of this year my daughter s class watched another movie. CL strives for mediocrity. This appears to be a common problem with San Francisco schools where the goal is to integrate children regardless of their abilities and/or psychological needs. But with CL they fail to challenge the kids. As a result kids who may excel in one area such as math or reading are ignored. The school does have great teachers and the principle pays lip service to parents concerns. But what the school lacks is a standardized curriculum that makes sure the kids are on a path to learn the material but also a way to help both the kids who are above average as well as those who are failing behind or have psychological issues. In addition, they make it difficult to participate as a volunteer unless you have experience working in a sweat shop then you can help manufacture some bedspreads for the fund raiser.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2012

My daughter just started K and we are blown away so far. Caring, committed teachers and staff, highly involved parents, and a warm and respectful environment. We feel very lucky to be here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2012

For an SF public school, CL is probably better than some, however, is is still a SF public school, they all have their unique problems. My 2 children are not pushed academically, rather shuffled through because they don't cause problems. Teachers are overworked and spend much of their time with the problem students. CL is supposed to be a parent participation school, but when I asked my 1st graders teacher on multiple occasions throughout the year to volunteer in the classroom, I was never given the opportunity. While there are outstanding teachers in every school, I would say there are teachers at CL need to be replaced. The split between campuses, while nice in a sense to keep the k-2 separate, creates a strange dichotomy with the school community. I would say that CL is still teaching to the test, doing the best it can with the curriculum, but there is enormous room for improvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 10, 2012

Sounds like one parent had one bad experience and wrote an extremely harsh review. Ouch! My experience of Mr Hack is completely different He is caring and a good communicator with an open door policy. Knows all the kids by name and tries to reach out to them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2010

We love the school!!! Great teachers and community!! Our son is VERY happy there, he has learned so much. His teachers keep him constantly challenged while fostering his self confidence and love of learning. The parent association is extremely involved and has done a tremendous job. We cannot recommend it more!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

The parents and school staff work together to make a great school for the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2010

It is a great school with a wonderful reputation in San Francisco. The principal, teachers, and most importantly, Parents all understand and work together to ensure our children have a well-rounded education even if the government will not help pay for it. My kids have enjoyed it and I highly recommend it. Thanks Lilienthal!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 7, 2010

We are now in our fifth year at CLS. Overall, the quality of the instruction that we have experienced has been excellent. The teachers we are dedicated and honoring of each child. The students' families work hard to contribute where and what they can to help make up for what is no longer covered by the state budget, from PE to the Arts. From our experience, it continues to be a great public school. And, of course, there's always room for improvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2010

As a African American Parent who's child attends Claire Lilienthal, the missing piece is lack of diversity. There is only one African American staff member (teacher's aide). I would like to see more staff diversity to meet the needs of minority students. The teachers are mediocre. The teachers are very receptive to parent participation in the classroom from my experience. This was one of the reasons I choose this school due to the model of parent involvement. It appears to be a class system of the haves and have nots. The wealthy parents seem to be more respected than the regular working class parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2010

I have been in this school K-8. (I'm in 8th grade now) and I would like to say how this is the best public school in the bay area for any child to go to without a doubt. The school is simply outstanding with what it does with parent involvement despite outrageous budget cuts by the state. Yes, im only 13. I am applying to the top high schools with the great preparation this school has given me.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 23, 2009

I agree with the last parent to write about Lilienthal. This school is in an extremely desirable/safe part of S.F.. I wanted my child to go there for that reason, as did the other parents I came to know at Claire. Safety is a priority in S.F.. Claire was in transition the whole enrollment of my child-7 years. Going through 3/4 principals. I feel there are teachers that really care and give their best, I felt overall there were more that did not. Sadly. Hooray for the parent involvement, they are welcomed,needed, and be prepared to give! Unfortunately, some teachers fought against music class, and we had no art classes. No AP classes in middle school. FYI: gifted students are not given more challenging work, than the other students, the 'Honors' that show on report cards, is there if they have good grades from regular curriculum. More high school/college prep is really needed here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2009

I read the review posted most recently and I am assuming it is not written by a parent as it suggests. or, it is written by an enthusiastic parent, one who appreciates their child attending a school that is safe, clean; where children are generally respected and parents are able to participate in making it a better school than were parents discouraged from helping. But the school is still in transition regarding the quality of education at the Middle School level. By contrast, there are no AP offerings at the school as one would find at a significantly larger school, such as A.P. Giannini or Presidio, where students who have achieved a level of excellence can prepare for matriculation in a better high school in the SFUSD system. That is simply not the case with Claire Lilienthal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2009

Claire Lilienthal s high test scores get better each year. The teachers are magnificent and motivate the children to learn and explore through hands-on activities. Parent involvement is strong and enhances opportunities for the children and supports the teachers in daily projects. Claire Lilienthal ranks at the top with top private schools in San Francisco which is one reason the demand for a seat is high. The school offers strong academics, a wonderful art curriculum, over-qualified yet passionate teachers, a language immersion program, a variety of sports for grades K-8, AP middle school classes, a safe environment and diversity. I'm glad I pressed to get my children into CLS. It was worth every ounce of stress. Good luck future parents!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2008

I will be entering 7th grade in the fall, and I have to say, my curriculum has been mediocre. I am a certified GATE student and I have gone to Center for Talented Youth summer camp for the past two years. The elementary school is pretty good. Most teachers are nice and enthusiastic. Once you reach middle school, though, it gets worse. I was not challenged at all. There is no GATE program, although supposedly there is. I spent most of my 'oh-so-fun' days of 6th grade doodling and staring at the wall. The middle school teachers are ok for mediocre to low scoring students, but teachers are supposed to recognize the needs of every student. Despite these problems, there has always been a sense of community at school. If you are planning to send your kid to a rigorous high school, I would suggest outside help, such as tutors.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 18, 2007

Goling primarily by test scores and location, I set my heart on Claire Lilienthal, and after many false starts, finally got both of my kids in. Sadly, however, I find the greatest advantage of this school is the involved parents, rather than any inspired teaching or great curriculum. Probably like most public schools these days, there is great emphasis on test scores, and particularly, any areas in need of improvement. Unfortunately, this comes at the expense of celebrating and fostering any areas of strength. Very middle of the road instruction and some of the teachers are very rigid.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2007

I have two children enrolled at Lilienthal and their educational experience has been outstanding. Their teachers have been outstanding and caring. My oldest daughter, now in college, was well prepared for her private high school experience. She still visits Lilienthal regularly and has stayed in touch with many of her teachers. I would not hesitate to highly recommend this school .
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

920

Change from
2012 to 2013

+16

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

920

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+16

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

83 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
69%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
79%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
75%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

62 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
92%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Females83%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learner77%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to state71%

Math

All Students86%
Females83%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantaged63%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learner86%
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to state81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females89%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian83%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability82%
English learner55%
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to state80%

Math

All Students90%
Females89%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged76%
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learner91%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to state87%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females89%
Males89%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to state82%

Math

All Students85%
Females83%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to state82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females89%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disability94%
Students with no reported disability82%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented97%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students85%
Females83%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantaged85%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disability75%
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students82%
Females89%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian81%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged77%
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disability88%
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate81%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students88%
Females85%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students80%
Females78%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asian79%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students93%
Females85%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate94%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females88%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate84%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students64%
Females60%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asian72%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate67%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state68%

English Language Arts

All Students87%
Females84%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state91%

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students74%
Females73%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asian80%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented97%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state76%

Science

All Students71%
Females67%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asian78%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate60%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Asian 34% 11%
White 29% 27%
Two or more races 16% 3%
Black 10% 7%
Hispanic 10% 51%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 22%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

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Special education / special needs

Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Hearing impairments

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many languages and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program school-wide for at least 25% of our population
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
School leaders can update this information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Patricia Harmon, Assistant Principal
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (415) 749-3431

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Standards-based
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Hearing impairments
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Intensive - the school offers a full program for many languages and/or offers at least one very comprehensive program school-wide for at least 25% of our population
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Transportation options
  • MUNI

Claire Lilienthal Elementary School Madison Campus Afterschool Program (after school program)

About the program
  • Students can do directly to the CLASP (Claire Lilienthal After School Program) program at the end of the school day. This non-profit program is run by Kindergarten teacher Frank Kanios on a first-come, first serve basis. The program offers recreation, homework help, crafts, storytime, and quiet time.
Operated by
  • Claire Lilienthal Afterschool Program
Days offered
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
End time
  • 6:00 pm
Is enrollment limited to students who attend the school?
  • Yes
What grades can participate?
  • 1-2
Is there a fee for the program?
  • No
Is financial aid available?
  • Yes

Claire Lilienthal Learning Academy (CLLA) (ExCEL Program) (after school program)

About the program
  • At CLLA, about 250 elementary and middle school youth complete their homework and participate in any number of club offerings including Tae Kwon Do, cooking and media arts at no cost to the youth. Select CLLA youth receive special academic assistance from certificated teachers.SFUSD ExCEL afterschool programs ensure involvement of teachers from students' schools to make sure that afterschool academics are aligned with the school day curriculum. Every school with an ExCEL program partners with a nonprofit community based organization to run activities and build bridges to the neighborhood.
Operated by
  • Presidio Community YMCA
Days offered
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
End time
  • 6:00 pm
Is enrollment limited to students who attend the school?
  • Yes
What grades can participate?
  • 3-8
Is there a fee for the program?
  • Yes
Website

Summer program 1

About the program
  • Each program has an academic, enrichment and physical activity component. The programs are based on a youth development model and include project based learning activities. The summer programs are operated by community based organizations that are contracted by SFUSD to provide the services based on grants to the school from California Department of Education. Each organization has a site specific enrollment process. Priority enrollment goes to the students from the school site. Students from other SFUSD schools are eligible to apply though in many of the elementary schools there is more demand than available slots. Funding changes year to year and program offerings change.
Types of activities
  • Academic
  • Arts
  • Athletic
Operated by
  • Presidio YMCA
Days offered
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

3630 Divisadero Street
San Francisco, CA 94123
Website: Click here
Phone: (415) 749-3516

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