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GreatSchools Rating

Milk (Harvey) Civil Rights Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 250 students

Our school is best known for its diverse demographics.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 24 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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44 reviews of this school


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Posted January 23, 2014

The Principal is great, the teachers are wonderful, and my daughter really loves the school. A few of the parents have been a little high strung over the years, but even they have to agree that the school is great for our kids. The scores keep exceeding all the growth expectations, and my own daughter is excelling with the support that she gets from the educators and administration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2013

My child is very happy first grader. The school has a lot of activities, movie night roller skate night, dancing etc etc. The teachers are amazing and the principal gives me a hug hello. What more could I want from a school. Nothing, this school is great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 27, 2013

My school has amazing teachers, faculty and families that are committed to creating the best learning environment for our children. We have a great Parent-Faculty community that work together building school spirit and honor our diverse families.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

My daughter is a very happy 1st grader at Harvey Milk and as a mom who toured more than a dozen schools looking for kindergarten, I feel like we did really well in the San Francisco lottery. The school isn't perfect--you can read the comments below and get that. But it's a warm, inclusive community, and the teachers are great. I like the principal well enough--she treats me like a friend and though I can't speak to her leadership qualities, she tries, and I don't understand the awful comments about her. Anyway, I'm not a political person, I just want my child to be happy and get a good education. I feel good when I take her to school and I enjoy the other parents and participating in the school events. It's a friendly, funky place where the kids don't have to look a certain way and they dress in creative ways--and diversity is encouraged.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2013

Teachers and staff really are great, but in all honesty the principal does not equally care about all students/parents. She does not unify the school, nor show leadership. The after school program is a good space for kids. Only positive experiences with our teachers, but horrible experiences trying to communicate with the principal. If rating the school independent of leadership, I'd give it four stars. Facilities, compared to many other schools, are small. No separate play area for Kinders/first graders.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2013

I work at HM & it's a great school. Some of these posts are very disheartening. I love my school& the direction in which it's headed. This school is centered around student achievement so if the principal has empowered students and staff to become leaders of morning circle,what is the charge? I'm a dear friend of the secretary.Please be clear that she has never spoken an ill word of the admin at this school. Her leaving was an independent decision based on what was best for her.To infer that her choice is a "red flag "is extremely misleading and speaks to how a small minority of folks at this school inflate and misconstrue information just to support their experience. FYI, that's considered lying. Truth: we have moved to a fee based program. But not many schools in SF offer a free morning/afterschool program. Sfusd reapplied for the grant but our school was not selected to receive it. Truth:The information became available in June at an ice cream social and since that time the administration has worked hard to offer an affordable program and has since apologized. The untruthful gossip must stop. If you are unhappy please do what is best for you but don't throw dirt in the process.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 5, 2013

I love the principal. She is amazing, truthful and is interactive with every student. She comes on hours that are not on her work day! I know there are some parents who expect to be treated like royalty, but our principal cares about creating a cohesive environment that includes both view points. The negative reviews you see, are by parents who don't go to this school anymore. We have an amazing staff, and principal! WE LOve our students! The after school program and before school program was based on a grant that a lot of schools lost based on free and reduced lunch status. Let us have a great year, roll up our sleeves and have a fabulous 2013/2014 school year!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted August 5, 2013

I selected this school because I was referred by a staff member. After reviewing other schools demographics I realized that Harvey Milk closely met my needs as a diversified school. I have an incoming 1st grader who I teach how to celebrate and respect not only her differences, but that of others. The year before last I was indirectly in the know about what was going on at this school. I attended a community meeting as a guest and some of the parents there were very abrasive and had a downright abusive tone toward the principal, staff, and one another.I can only assume that the negative posts are from those same parents. I am coming to HMCRA to roll up my sleeves and help get the work done for the betterment of ALL children, including mine. If my child is happy then so am I. The focus has shifted due to a sense of entitlement. I heard that entitlement in a post written earlier about the contribution of increasing test scores due to middle class families. AND??? Equity is about making sure everyone has access to the same thing. A cohesive community should model that. This have and have not mentality is systemic yet I still long to be a part of this school because I seek change.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 5, 2013

I selected this school because I was referred by a staff member. After reviewing other schools demographics I realized that Harvey Milk closely met my needs as a diversified school. I have an incoming 1st grader who I teach how to celebrate and respect not only her differences, but that of others. The year before last I was indirectly in the know about what was going on at this school. I attended a community meeting as a guest and some of the parents there were very abrasive and had a downright abusive tone toward the principal, staff, and one another.I can only assume that the negative posts are from those same parents. I am coming to HMCRA to roll up my sleeves and help get the work done for the betterment of ALL children, including mine. If my child is happy then so am I. The focus has shifted due to a sense of entitlement. I heard that entitlement in a post written earlier about the contribution of increasing test scores due to middle class families. AND??? Equity is about making sure everyone has access to the same thing. A cohesive community should model that. This have and have not mentality is systemic yet I still long to be a part of this school because I seek change.


Posted April 30, 2013

This school has increasing test scores probably because the socioeconomic demographics are shifting to more middle class kids, not due to any other change at the school in the past few years. The previous principal was more involved - responded to email, participated in meetings. The current principal doesn't respond to email, and often yawns or looks askance during meetings where parents are present. This could be a great school community but it's currently divided and hurting due to continued insults flung between principal, and some staff, teachers and parents. I recommend this school for parents who are not interested in being involved. I've seen parents invest a lot of time, raise a lot of money, and then be called names and told their effort and fundraising is not valued or welcome. Sign up for the school's yahoo group and read the insults and namecalling. Attend a PFC meeting and see what's discussed. Attend an SSC meeting and see the divisiveness. It's a shame. Nobody at this school is a bigot or elitist, but adults in the community still use those words to describe each other.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2013

I am a proud parent of two current HMCRA students. In addition, I have a 7th grader who attended HMCRA as well. Correct: The past three years have been rough for teachers and parents who transitioned through 2 principals in 3 years. Thankfully, the teachers and staff did a great job of insulating the kids from the drama. The kids truly come first in this school and the teachers are great which I way my family is still there. Yes, the departure of Friends of Harvey Milk and the previous support staff is heartbreaking, however, I do believe that the school will recover with time. Several years ago,I choose Harvey Milk because of it's close knit, intimate and kid-focused supportive environment. I still believe i made a great choice. Incorrect: Some of the comments would lead a reader to believe the school is similar to a scene from a the "Wild Wild West." I am not disregarding anyone's opinion,however, I think perspective parents should visit the school for a more complete view of the environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2013

This school is a happy place for children. I was unaware of all the problems from the 2011-2012 year. I have a shy son who hated preschool. For him a small, safe, local school where he already knew some children was important. He has really changed this year. He has a great ego. He is a peacemaker in his classroom. He helps others. He's mastered reading. He socially has flourished. This is an elementary school where kids learn and have fun. I have also wanted to leave due to the lack of overall leadership and lack of parent involvement, but each time I feel that way, I ask my son is he happy. And he bounces away saying yes, he loves his school. The teachers are involved in their classrooms and do what they can with a limited budget. My son is in aftercare and loves the Y program. Even days when he wants me to get him a bit early, I get there and have to spend an hour watching him finish the activity he was in. All schools will have issues from time to time and it seems like they are mostly caused by parents not children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

HMCRA was our top choice in the SFUSD lottery - when I toured the school and spoke with parents, everyone praised the community, the parental involvement, and the dedication of the teachers. Sadly, much of that community spirit seems to have disintegrated between tour dates in 2011 and the start of K in 2012. Apart from losing the support of Friends of Harvey Milk (the main fundraising body for the school, and provider of extended care services) in fall of 2012, there were issues with the principal and at least one teacher at the school. I made an effort to support the school, both through donations to their fundraising drives, and by volunteering in the classroom, but found that unfortunately the bulk of other parents just didn't want to get involved. We left the school after one semester; a full 20% of my child's kinder class also transferred out of HMCRA, either to other public schools or to private schools. I wanted to like this school, and I do believe the teachers are doing the best they can with limited funding - but the petty arguments constantly (and currently) breaking out on the school's listserv make me glad I moved my child out of the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

The teachers are dedicated and experienced and do a very good job of meeting each child's needs. My child does really well at this school, has good friends, loves going to school there, and enjoys the space. The new afterschool program is well organized and supports and nutures the students well. The majority of the parents create a supportive friendly community. However, parent involvement in fundraising is fairly low and the PFC ("Parent Faculty Club" - it's not a PTA) has not had the resources/volunteers/support to help it become a PTA. The PFC could raise more money with more involvement and support and resources (and if it was a PTA then it could receive grants). I've seen fewer parents involved at the school, donating to the school, this year, than in previous years. The nonprofit that used to raise funds for the school now raises funds for other schools because this school won't accept funds raised by that nonprofit. Staff and parents argue with, insult each other in the group email list for the school. It's a mixed bag. I wish this school had better fundraising/involvement and a leader who would step up and manage tension and embrace parent involvement and all fundraising.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

Harvey Milk could be a great school. The teachers are amazing: dedicated, smart and just fun to be around. But, unfortunately, the current Principal has alienated an entire group of parents and has put a huge strain on the parent community as a whole. It makes you wonder when you realize that since she has been at HM two different PFC presidents have not only stepped down, but have left the school entirely. Some of the positive reviews below are a reaction to an article posted here 4/23 about the challenges the school community faces. I'm sure some parents really get a lot out of Harvey Milk, but I wanted to be honest about the other side of the story too. I no longer feel welcome there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

HMCRA was at one point a great school, but the principal who came on board in 2012 was divisive and completely unsupportive of students with special needs. For example, she flat out refused to provide special education testing for my son, dismissing him as "Just a C student." As this refusal failed to maintain the district standards, we complained to the Board of Education and the Superintendant of Schools, to no avail. We transferred to another school, one with a compassionate, involved principal, and that "C student" is now an A student. Beyond that specific complaint, we noted that she fostered a toxic environment wherein quality teachers and quality support staff all felt the need to leave. Roughly a quarter of my son's class transferred out after one year of this principal's reign. Some good teacher remain, but the atmosphere is still so argumentative and bitter that it is difficult for any group of adults associated with HMCRA to move forward with the goal of helping the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

Let's get back to the basics, the CHILDREN! HMCRA is a GREAT learning environment for all children and has made many positive strides in academics, test scores are making double digit high jumps and teachers here are dedicated professionals and are working enthusiastically under the current Principle. Its sad to see so many negative comments about this school... And when most of the negative comments are about adults that have personal issues with the principle. Contrary to the other statements, parents all have one goal in mind and do work hard to make this school great! There have been some hurdles in the past (2011-2012) and even with all of the bickering and behind the scenes drama that other parents are speaking about, the bottom line is the STUDENTS, the principle, faculty, staff, and parents make this school shine bright! I have been at two other schools in this district and this is first school that feels like we belong. Parents whose children no longer attend HMCRA should spend their time writing reviews for their own school instead of writing negative comments about ours. Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy is a Great School!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

We love Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy. Our daughter is in her third year at the school. She loves second grade and has had a great experience overall with the school, teachers and the entire community. She has made so many friends in all different grades. The focus on "families" (not individual families, but there's a very welcoming attitude on that too!) is a great part of the school and we hope a real lasting legacy of the school's commitment to inclusion and unity. HMCRA Families bonds students from all grades (teachers and aides as well...) and allows them to interact, socialize and learn from each other in ways the "standard curriculum" never could. HM school has wonderful dedicated teachers and a supportive administration and staff. The Principal, now in her 2nd year has always been available to me one on one. She is very personable and friendly with our family and the children of HM. Harvey Milk Civil Rights Academy is a small beautiful school in the castro. We hope that our 2 year old will be going to this school when she begins kindergarten.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2013

HMCRA should get five stars for most of the teachers, many of whom are truly and widely regarded as exceptional within sfusd and beyond. The philosophy and diversity and the location and the size of the school are truly unique. I don't pay attention to all the infighting between parents, but what I do notice is that there is a serious decline in programs, funding, and while I think the principal has a tough job she is just not handling problems with the kind of leadership necessary. I'm very sorry to say that there's a "sinking ship" feeling and it's heartbreaking. The school needs a principal who is a uniter, who has a vision, and who can save all the amazing things this school and the community has to offer. We're hanging in, trying to do our part, but have no idea what the future holds if the administration remains the same. Another thing to note is the disciplinary approach: very strict and punitive, benching kids for recess and some teachers give candy as rewards. I don't know if other schools do the same, but I read that sfusd was supposed to implement supportive discipline. All that said, my kid is learning and loves the teachers. We're not giving up yet!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 23, 2013

Harvey Milk went through a little rough patch with new principle in 2012, but this year things have really inproved. My daughter is extremely happy with HMCRA and even asked to go back to school during spring break!! She's learning so much, and LOVES her teacher! I love the diversity and the emphasis on civil rights. I am very happy we chose this school and I am really looking forward to the next year! Yeah for Harvey Milk!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

826

Change from
2012 to 2013

-28

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

826

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-28

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
29%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
47%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
67%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females75%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged29%
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state44%

Math

All Students75%
Females79%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to state63%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students58%
Females58%
Males59%
African American58%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged48%
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students69%
Females67%
Males71%
African American50%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students59%
Females71%
Males44%
African American42%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students55%
Females62%
Males47%
African American55%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females53%
Males75%
African American36%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged82%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students52%
Females40%
Males67%
African American18%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged44%
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students48%
Females33%
Males67%
African American27%
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged31%
Non-economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 28% 27%
Black 26% 7%
Hispanic 17% 51%
Two or more races 17% 3%
Asian 9% 11%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 41%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Special education coordinator
Speech and language therapist(s)
Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff None
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Cognitive disability
  • Emotional behavioral disabilities
  • Hearing impairments
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Orthopedic impairments
  • Other health impairments
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
  • Visual impairments
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Garden/Greenhouse

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Poetry

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Kitchen
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")

Gifted & talented

Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 9:30am
School end time
  • 3:30pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 8:00 a.m.
  • After school: ends at 6:30 p.m.
School Leader's name
  • Tracy Peoples
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (415) 241-6545

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Project-based
  • Standards-based
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular special education needs
Specialized programs for specific types of special education students
  • Autism
  • Cognitive disability
  • Emotional behavioral disabilities
  • Hearing impairments
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Orthopedic impairments
  • Other health impairments
  • Significant developmental delay
  • Specific learning disabilities
  • Speech and language impairments
  • Visual impairments
Foreign languages taught
  • None
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Poetry/Creative writing teacher(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Special education coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Tutor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • None
Extra learning resources offered
  • Acceleration
  • Counseling
  • Differentiated learning programs
  • Tutoring
Transportation options
  • Difficult street parking. Muni: 33, 35
  • Transportation provided for special education students only
School facilities
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Internet access
  • Kitchen
  • Library
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Performance stage
  • Playground

After school program 1

About the program
  • The afterschool program at Harvey Milk provides academic assistance, recreational activities, program enrichment, and youth development.SFUSD ExCEL afterschool programs ensure involvement of teachers from students' schools to make sure that after-school academics are aligned with the school day curriculum. Every school with an ExCEL program partners with a nonprofit community-based organization to run activities and build bridges to the neighborhood.
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • None
Girls sports
  • None

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • None

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Neither uniforms nor dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

This school accepts applications on a

rolling basis

 
Apply now
 

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
Everett Middle School
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

4235 19th Street
San Francisco, CA 94114
Website: Click here
Phone: (415) 241-6276

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