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GreatSchools Rating

San Francisco Community Alternative School

Public | K-8 | 286 students

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 9 ratings
2012:
Based on 12 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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46 reviews of this school


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Posted October 31, 2013

SFC is a small school where children can really be known and it s K-8, which means my child will be able to develop deep friendships and, as a Middle schooler, will hopefully be able to be a mentor to a younger student at school. My daughter s teacher is fantastic calm, knowledgeable, and so insightful in helping kids talk through social conflicts when they arise. Because the grades are looped she will be in this classroom for 2 years. The class is also undertaking their first big hands-on science project for the year, to be showcased in Dec. (Project Open House events happen twice a year). The overall feeling I have about SFC is that the staff is trying to make it work for everyone who is involved in the school. From what I have seen, they are very respectful of differences and do their best to make each child feel safe and recognized. They are very open to feedback, welcome new ideas and appreciate volunteering efforts. SFC feels like a really unique, special place. I feel lucky to be involved with it. p.s. I just heard that the play structure will be renovated during summer 2014.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2013

My kids are in 2nd and 4th and are new to SFC this year. I was REALLY anxious about the transition from their old public school, which they'd both attended from kinder -- but SFC has been fantastic. Within a few weeks all the teachers & specialists (garden, PE, Playworks, library, dance, art, music, counselor) knew my kids, their quirks, and best how to work with them. My kids are both strong academically, and I was pleased to see the speed with which their teachers identified their strengths and found ways to engage them in lessons that covered material they already knew. For the first time neither of them say that school is boring. When asked what he likes about SFC my son says " I liked my old school, when I was there I rated it about a 7, but SFC is SO much better, I think my old school is really a 4 & SFC is a 9, I need to go a bit more and see if its a 10." When I asked what he liked best he said " the kids are really friendly & all the teachers really like teaching" And don't we all want our kids in schools where the teachers really want to be there? I know the focus on small classes, project based learning & community will serve my kids well through 8th grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2013

My son is a new Kindergartner at this school. Going to kindergarten is a tough transition, but I've been surprised at how quickly my son made it through with the support of his teacher, great kids, and great parents. There's room for everyone to help and give back at this school and every year, there are more and more involved parents - making this school better every year. For a boy who wasn't interested in reading, I've been shocked at how much he's learned and how many words he can read now. We're excited our kid will get to experience project-based learning at its best, growing and thriving through eighth grade with his friends.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2013

My son is in kindergarten at SFC, so we're about two months in. Before he started, he couldn't read or write anything except for his own name; now when we read together, he's reading about half of the words. He gets super excited about learning a new "sight word" each Monday, and he really likes his teacher. His favorite part of the day is the after school program, which has a new, really energetic director this year. I've appreciated how involved other parents are with the school, and how willing everyone is (including teachers and the principal) to talk openly about solutions when problems arise.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 16, 2013

Sad to say this school is not good! We wanted it to be and we can tell a few teachers and parents are really trying... But overall this school doesn't have the means or support it needs to educate the students and its just not safe. The "justice" thats referred to at this school sounds good but isn't practiced, and honestly my priority is to get my kid to read & write!; Compared to another public school my older child went to, we're shocked how poor this is. Hoping to transfer by spring.... :(
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

Wonderful small school! Caring and dedicated staff and parents. My children have been there since kindergarten-now in 5th and 3rd grade. We feel blessed that we can stay through 8th! There are many wonderful extra-curricular activities-garden, sports, arts, choir. My family and I love Project Based Learning, restorative practices, balanced literacy initiative. The principal is so dedicated to the school, I swear she does not sleep! She addresses any issues that come up professionally and with aplomb. She is also incredibly approachable to both students and parents. I know that the school has gotten some "bad press" but we have only had positive experiences there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

I have two children at San Francisco Community one in 7th and one in 3rd. SFC is a small school that truly nurtures its students. In all of these years, my kids have only had the most dedicated teachers the types that pour everything into their classes. The project-based learning is the reason we chose the school and the reason we stay. It encourages the kids to truly think, instead of learn in a rote manner. In line with this thinking, test scores are not overly valued at SFC, which I also appreciate. SFC might not have the bells and whistles of other schools, but it's got heart, soul, and a fantastically talented staff. My kids have thrived here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 21, 2013

SFC is so great for kids on every level. The kids are encouraged to have/be Strong Minds, Strong Hearts, Strong Individuals and Strong Community. They are a project based learning school and a small school by design. Kids have the same teacher for 2 years in a row so there is a lot of personalized attention. My son thrives at this school and I'm excited for his future because of this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2013

I have two children at SFC and our family has been at the school for four years. I won't deny that SFC has had problems, but I firmly believe that those problems are in the past. While I cannot speak to every family's experience, I can say that our family's experience has been excellent here. My children's teachers have been exemplary, focusing not only on academic achievement but also social development and conflict resolution. As a parent, I feel that my opinions and contributions are valued. On top of that, some of the things that make SFC special are: 1) Project- based learning allows for integrated and in-depth learning (One-third of our graduating class last year went to Lowell), 2) mixed grades and looping means students will have the same teacher for 2 years, 3) Garden program gives students hands-on experience (we recently received an Education Outside grant to extend our garden program even further), 4) K-8 structure means that students and families can form long-term relationships with staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 27, 2012

The teachers at this school care about each child. I have a child who graduated from this school and is now attending a private school with a high GPA. If it wasn't for SFC helping her develop her study habits and encouraging her to be involved with the community, she would not be as successful as she is now in school. I also have another child who currently attends this school and she really enjoys going to school every day. She comes home every evening showing us what she has learned. This school has proven to be a great public school. Last year so many graduating students went on to private and high ranking public schools that speaks for itself.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2012

Our middle schooler has been at SFC since kinder and we love this small, warm, special school. Because the school is teacher-run, it has many extraordinarily talented teachers; sometimes, teachers don't work out with the extra demands. Sometimes SFC is not a good fit for every family either, take a tour to get a sense of this. My son has thrived with the projects, the small community, the individual attention, and the outdoor education. The free after school has been a life saver for us. As he has gotten older he switched to the adjacent Boys and Girls Club, and now like other older kids walks across Mission St to the library to do homework after school. He is well grounded in academics and has high test scores - but what he has gained from his SFC education goes far beyond what is measured on a standardized test. The school places an emphasis on critical thinking and community values, and views each student as gifted, talented, and valuable.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2012

All these sudden 5 ratings have to make you wonder! The same small group of parents (almost clique-ish) strive so hard to make this school "look good" but let's get real...this school in an area where most true locals barely even have an email address!! Please don't be fooled by a fancy internet presence! My peeves with this school - 1) little supervision after school and some kids repeatedly flock to Mission Street when they should be at afterschool care. Safety risk! 2) "project based" learning= less "homework" lacking reinforcement of lessons learned everyday. Kids need consistency some form of good old pencil pushing at home! The vision is good, but needs a little fine tuning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2012

I have two kids at SFC, one in the sixth grade and one in second grade and I have never had a bad not even a mediocre teacher. They've all been truly amazing, devoted, big-thinking educators. We were drawn to this school because of its project-based learning philosophy and it hasn't let me down. I've witnessed my children learn in the most engaging ways, from projects on roller coasters and how they work to baking and the science and math of it. I don't believe in rote learning and I feel like my children have been challenged to apply the basic tenants of education to real life experiences. Also, anyone who has fear of their kids having to transfer in the tender tween years to big middle schools can take solace that their children will be able to stay here through 8th grade in a nurturing setting with a small group of students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2012

We have been part of the SFC community for the last 5 years and are big supporters of the school. We like the small school approach, the K-8 system, project based learning and the support we receive from the very dedicated staff. All the teachers so far have been excellent and very experienced. Yes, unfortunately the active parent group is small, but all involved parents are very dedicated and committed to the school. Parents of 5th grader
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2012

We're loving SFC. My daughter is in K and we feel so very lucky that we landed here. Because the school was founded as a Small School by Design, they have some curricular freedom to teach through projects, which was very attractive to us. Go to the school on a Project Night and you'll see very proud and engaged students showing off their impressive, multi-disciplinary work. The school has so many of the things we were looking for--strong, experienced, kind teachers who know how to set personalized goals, engage students, and who make it a priority to nurture and sustain children's innate curiosity, as well as a diverse student body and staff. We also really liked the practice of "looping" grades--each child has the same teacher for 2 years. We love the small size of the school, as well as the K-8 model, which creates opportunities for older students to be mentors and reading buddies and eases or eliminates the transition to middle school. Homework for K/1 consists of reading only, which fits in well with our priorities. Most importantly, though, our daughter adores her K teacher and loves P.E., library day, and the garden class. Come visit SFC and see for yourself!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

Our son has been here for 4 years, and we love it. The school is very focused on academics and our son has excelled. Teachers are first rate. Like all public schools, it has faced funding challenges lately, but with the help of involved parents the school has continued to provide music and PE classes, and a free after-school program. There is a great sense of community between parents and staff. Communication is facilitated by the school's small size. The student body is friendly and diverse, which makes for a very enriching learning environment. All students are treated equitably and are appropriately challenged academically. When problems have arisen, staff have been very quick to address issues in an open and effective way. Many students come from the local neighborhood, but a number of parents actively seek out the school because of the project-based learning program, mixed-grade class options and community ethos. Because of its location, the school is less competitively subscribed to than some. I believe it would be a lot more popular if it had more of a central location. However, it is a great asset to the neighborhood. I'm very glad we have it on our doorstep.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

our two older kids are navigating large high schools with aplomb after their time in the small, nurturing SFC environment. our youngest is thriving with the extra transition to middle school SFC provides in grades 5 and 6. our kids have received an extraordinary amount of individual attention and love at SFC. some of the things we particularly appreciate are project based learning, outdoor education, free after school program, and the school's emphasis on equity, social values and restorative practices.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

Our family has been at this school since our son began kindergarten and he is now finishing up 5th grade, ready for middle school at SFC. We pulled our son out of a preschool-8th private school after we visited SFC and found it to a wonderful learning environment, especially for bright, curious, and compassionate children and families. The teachers and students create a lovingly supportive place in which kids can learn and the expectation that all kids can thrive with support and guidance keeps the school focused on equity and genunie learning (not just focusing on raising test scores). Parent involvement is appropriate not overbearing (I want professionals teaching my kid and running his school not parents, but parents are an important, supportive part of the community). We hope many other students have the benefit of attending this small school by design where all children are seen as gifted, talented, and teachable. I encourage folks to visit and see if it is a good fit for them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

SFC has an excellent teaching staff and they are willing to go above and beyond to help the children succeed. Due to increasing costs, I took my daughter out of private and I selected this school because of it's small size and great location. The school is located next door to a Boys and Girls Club which is great for homework help and after school help. My daughter and I have not regretted our decision. It is a K-8 school and my only regret is that my daughter didn't go there from the beginning of elementary school. There is a diverse student population which is always a plus and a majority of their eigth grade graduation class will be going to some of San Francisco's top public and private schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 15, 2012

My son has thrived here. He is in 2nd grade and wants to get to school early and doesn't want to come home. He's developed great conflict resolution skills, and is reading far above grade level (Harry Potter in one week, Lemony Snicket the next). He likes to learn, which is a hard thing to teach. Projects on the human body, birds, health, etc. have enabled him to learn a lot more than would be taught from a textbook. It suffers from lack of resources like any other PS, but it has committed teachers, and an overall positive vibe. Some parents have not found it to be a good match for their kids, but this even happens at well-reputed schools like Clarendon and Rooftop b/c everyone has different values. Make your own decision. Check it out for your self.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

746

Change from
2012 to 2013

-32

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

746

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-32

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

3 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

2 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
81%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
20%

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
56%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

20 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

26 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
52%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
50%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
56%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
27%

2010

 
 
48%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
56%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
26%

2010

 
 
56%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
59%

2010

 
 
51%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
6%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
17%

2010

 
 
18%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

32 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
33%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students27%
Females21%
Males31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino8%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability31%
English learner8%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students52%
Females43%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner50%
Fluent-English proficient and English only53%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students20%
Females17%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability21%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students55%
Females50%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students30%
Females38%
Males23%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students37%
Females31%
Males43%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females65%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduate27%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students53%
Females41%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduate18%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students56%
Females41%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino23%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented91%
Parent education - not a high school graduate18%
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Females73%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged68%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students48%
Females50%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged52%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability46%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students48%
Females42%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged37%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate56%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students62%
Females50%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged53%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate69%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students29%
Females39%
Males15%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability31%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only30%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate23%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students47%
Females56%
Males36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino18%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate36%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students6%
Females0%
Males13%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino9%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged0%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability7%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only6%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate7%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students47%
Females44%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 37% 51%
Asian 28% 11%
White 16% 27%
Black 12% 7%
Two or more races 6% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 67%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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Arts & music

Music
  • Instrumental music lessons

Language learning

Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Nora Houseman
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (415) 337-6879

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Standards-based
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Moderate - the school consistently offers a full program for particular ESL/ELL needs

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • BART, Muni

San Francisco Community School ExCEL Afterschool Program (after school program)

About the program
  • SFUSD ExCEL afterschool programs ensure involvement of teachers from students' schools to make sure that after-school academics are aligned with the school day curriculum. Every school with an ExCEL program partners with a nonprofit community-based organization to run activities and build bridges to the neighborhood.
Operated by
  • Bay Area Community Resources
Days offered
  • Monday
  • Tuesday
  • Wednesday
  • Thursday
  • Friday
End time
  • 6:25 pm
Is enrollment limited to students who attend the school?
  • No
What grades can participate?
  • 1-8
Is there a fee for the program?
  • No
Website
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

125 Excelsior Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94112
Website: Click here
Phone: (415) 469-4739

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