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GreatSchools Rating

Carolyn A. Clark Elementary School

Public | K-6

 
 

Living in San Jose

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $428,500. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $2,200.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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29 reviews of this school


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Posted March 20, 2014

This school is amazing! It is a bright, cheery space. The students are involved in many activities and the school has lots of technology like SmartBoards in every room. My kids love going here and want to participate in all the activities offered--especially Hip-Hop!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2013

My kids are transferred to Clark and find Clark to be more challenging in academics. Teachers at Clark tend to teach each subject area more in depth. Clark's kids work harder, get more involved in math (like Math Olympiad), and almost every kid learns one kind of musical instruments. The school is probably under-resourced in staffing and teacher-to-student ratio is not great. However, I think the school is doing a great job in getting the kids to learn a lot. Clark's teachers are over-worked... so be easy on them.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 19, 2013

I agree up to some point with the last parent review, when she/he said that the school has high scores because parents can afford to pay after school programs, I witnessed it when I asked one of the girls in my daughter's kindergarten class where she had learned to read so fluent, she told me she was in programs after school and like many other kids were. As a stayed home mom I volunteer and supported my daughter the most I could but sometimes I did feel that my daughter was being left behind academically because they have such high expectations on a 5 year old. Her teacher was great though very supportive with her specially because her home language is Spanish she was in a program for few weeks to help her catch up. I have been thinking of moving my daughter to a dual language immersion school but it's hard to decide when this school is very well equipped. Overall I have no complaints, exempt that snacks in kindergarten are brought by parents to share with the class and only certain things that keep my little one hungry; however she learned so much AAnd I'm just thankful to see great teachers caring for our kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2013

Don't be fooled by the nice houses around this school. This was my son's first year here and just say I've been losing a lot of sleep. Before attending this school my son use to wake up every morning excited to go to school. That has changed completely. Now he asks me is the weekend here yet. He doesn't enjoy going to school like he use to. His teacher is so moody. After talking to numerous parents I've been told not to bring up any concerns you have about your child's teacher. Unless you want your child's teacher to give your child a hard time at school. It's so sad to have parents tell me that. It worries me when I send my son off to school. Living in a more upscale neighborhood you would think the school would be better. Unfortunately these teachers are not held accountable for any of their acts due to the teacher's union. Teachers cannot reprimanded for anything. Teachers are untouchable. The reason why the schools scores high in these affluent areas is that parents can afford to send their kids to after school programs, its not because the teachers here are good teachers. In conclusion don't think just because your paying more for a house the schools are better
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2012

My son just graduated from the school after staying here for 6 years. Overall, this is wonderful school from academic, to environment, to activities, to teachers caring, to parent involvement, to students themselves. This school is very compatitive to private schools and other great schools in Palo Alto and Cupertino. My son likes the school so much that he doen't allow us to move out Evergreen at all, although some of his friends are in Cupertino and Palo Alto. I recommend parents being more active to the school events, more thinking, more caring, more volunteers, to build better community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2012

First let me say if you do not have a child that goes to this school why are you making these specific comments? It sounds like you are attacking a teacher without all the facts and then ranting about whatever comes into your mind. By the way, the teacher that you have named is one of the best, caring,creative,inspiring people I have ever met.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2012

I would like to respond to the review by someone claiming to NOT have children at Clark, yet they seem to have teacher names and THINK they know other details such as a specific incident that might have happened at the school, API importance of the district/school, the amount of homework, and that students at Clark have "suicidal thoughts" due to the pressures put on them by the school. Really?! First, this person must be an unhappy parent that is referencing something to do with their own student, or it is some with an axe to grind for some other reason. If it is an actual parent, how dare you mention a teacher by name and not even talk to them directly, which I really doubt you did, because if you had, you would know the teacher mentioned is NOTHING like what you stated. Very cowardly of you. If your issue is with this teacher, then why are you slamming the entire school/district? The teachers at this school put no more pressure on the students than do the parents. The goal from all involved at this school is to create successful and productive citizens in the local and global communities. How DARE you speak this way of this wonderful teacher and the school/district.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted May 10, 2011

I am consistently impressed by the quality of education in this school. Way much better than expected.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2010

plenty of parent volunteers, computer equipments, extra curriculum activities, friendly teachers and principle, safe environment,
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2010

Excellent school. My son started his first grade in this school since the school started. I have 2 kids going to this school. The teachers and parents are very involved with the kids education in this school. The principal has been a great support to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2010

My kids have been in this school since the school opened. The school is good except for the secretary. I have had a very bad experience with her.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2009

This school has the best staff and teachers possible. Everybody really cares and the teachers always help out, a lot. This place is wonderful and I would recommend it for anyone and everyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2009

Best school and great teachers ...The students really get involve in the activities, especially the odessey of the mind program ....
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 31, 2009

This is a great school, my son will be in fourth grade this year, it seems every year he changes his mind about who his best teacher is, since all the teachers are doing excellant jobs, it is hard for him to decide...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 22, 2009

I love this school. Seems a little ridiculous to rezone the boundaries and have enrollment go down forcing the transfer of some amazing teachers. Why? I ask. Seems like more sense to keep the boundaries and keep the children and keep the teachers....you already had the resources to handle it...all they are doing is moving the problems around in the meantime losing teachers that have made Carolyn Clark the school that it is.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2009

This is a great school. This was my child's new school and I did see a lot of improvement. I like the way the school keeps parents involved. We made the right decision for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2008

Great school! Great teachers! A wonderful learning environment for all the students that attend.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2008

An excellent school, great environment for a kid. Most teachers and the Pricncipal get my Kudos. A perfect balance and averry healthy envronment
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2008

I'm quite impressed with this school. There are so many extra activities after school for my kid to be involved in. He's a 1st grader and I've gotten him involved in chess club, piano, and run & walk club. They also have Arts Attack program for the kids. The PTA has a lot of family activities as well. Amount of h/w is ok too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2008

This I a CA distunguished school so my kid love it plus the the teachers don't give a lot of homework and encourage them to work hard.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

962

Change from
2012 to 2013

+9

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

962

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+9

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
89%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

123 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

127 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

129 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
87%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
88%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

107 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
85%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

106 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students87%
Females92%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian89%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)85%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students92%
Females98%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability98%
English learner90%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)85%
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females92%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian90%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students94%
Females95%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learner69%
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate98%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate99%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students94%
Females97%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian98%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)89%
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate99%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females98%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian99%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)84%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females90%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students92%
Females90%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students93%
Females94%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students94%
Females98%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate97%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students84%
Females85%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian94%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate84%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

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Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Asian 77%
Hispanic 7%
Two or more races 5%
White 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Black 0%

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 7%N/AN/A
English language learners 20%N/AN/A

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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3701 Rue Mirassou Drive
San Jose, CA 95148
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 223-4560

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