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GreatSchools Rating

Discovery Charter School

Charter | K-8

 

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Living in San Jose

Situated in an inner city neighborhood. The median home value is $516,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,410.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 11 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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144 reviews of this school


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Posted April 20, 2014

We have been in DCS for more than 5 years now and the direction that the Campus at DCS I is taking makes us glad we are leaving. What was once was a vibrant and passionate school has turned into a bureaucracy under the complete lack of leadership of Dale Jones and Debby Perry. The "executive director" appears ready to close the middle school and focus on the elementary (K-5) which has allowed him to functionally abandon the middle school students and their teachers. We have been forced to pay for outside tutoring in order to make up fo rthe math deficits our kids have suffered at this school. While DCS is a developmental school, it is no longer hitting the basics. Very sad to see.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2014

We have been at DCS for 6 years, my daughter went from 3rd grade to 8th Grade. There are times when I have been concerned about the academics, it looked like she wasn't learning and homework was minimal even through Middle School. I knew my daughter had grown to be self confident, could advocate for herself and loved going to school each day, but worried about how she would be in a big public high school. The first year is nearly over and she is doing incredibly well! She has a 4.0 GPA and has loved playing team sports year round. She summed it up with "I didn't just learn random stuff at Discovery, I learned how to learn, how to ask questions and to find answers myself". Academics are not traditional at Discovery, and kids are expected to learn to the best of their ability, not to a level that someone else decides is good enough. Graduating students (from all that I've heard) go on to great success in High School both socially and academically, with or without tutors. (We couldn't afford tutors and didn't need to with any of my three children through their Discovery education). Discovery isn't for every child unless you are looking for something more than a test score.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2013

I am proud of our school. We have been here since its inception, understanding the philosphy of the school. It is light on homework, but the upside is that it has given us the time to have piano lessons, dance class, swim team, and other activities without feeling stressed. The school's API scores have always been in the 900's . we do not do outside academic classes. My eighth grader is taking geometry.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 5, 2013

I moved my daughter, Kinder to another shcool... My decision was right... My daughter is very happy and enjoys a new school.. She said that it is really school.. Discovery school has lots of fun things, but I have to tell you something... School has no responsiblity of academic standard !! Which means most of kids have tutors, tutors, tutors in order to follow CA academic goal.. Therefore, API was good... That score doesn't belong to teacher's effort, but parents.. Parents do everything....!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 25, 2013

There is no homework, no textbook and no reward. Teachers and staffs are nice. Parents are working hard. Kids are all happy. The only problem is that teachers don't teach. They just assign projects to students and let students to figure it out by themselves. Students can't learn basic knowledge from the teachers. And they can't even get correct answers from the teachers. This is the philosophy of this school. If you don't agree with the philosophy, it is not a right school for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2013

Worst school ever, principal and teachers bully the kids and there is nothing done to stop It, the worst part is the principal suspended me for getting punched in the face!


Posted November 5, 2013

This review is for Discovery 2, which opened in August, 2013. First, let me say that Discovery's philosophy, particularly as espoused by Dale Jones, is incredibly appealing. Students are welcomed and accepted for who they are and parents and educators alike are introduced to the Positive Discipline philosophy that has been the cornerstone of Parent Participation schools. The principal, Lori King, is dynamic and committed. The teachers are excited, though perhaps a little overwhelmed by the chaos of a brand new school. This is to be expected. It is difficult to fairly critique a school campus that is so new, particularly when the educators and the parents are passionately working to build the community. I applaud them. That said, many of the challenges that come with the founding of the school have been compounded by the short lead time and overall haste to establish a second campus to meet the demands of parents who wanted 'Discovery too.'. These growing pains have been challenging, challenging enough that my husband and I question our leap of faith daily. My child is happy and loves the freedom and the lack of overarching structure. We're waiting and seeing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2013

I have seen my children blossom at Discovery Charter School. The dedication of the staff and family community provide for a supportive environment that promotes a life long love of learning. My kids come home with smiles on their faces and talk about what they are learning and doing at school and on the many field trips they experience throughout the year. I am grateful to be part of the Discovery school community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2013

This is for Discovery Two. We have only been there for two weeks, but we are absolutely loving the transition from private catholic school. The whole environment is more relaxing and all the adults seem to want to be there for their kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 1, 2013

I'm down to just one child at DCS now. He loves it, and is an active participant in his education. He is very comfortable approaching his teachers and other parents. The parent teacher conferences are student led. Since the child prepares for the presentation to the parents and evaluates what he is accomplished and his goals, there is total buy in by the student. If you prefer the drill and kill, rote learning teaching style you should look elsewhere, perhaps Challenger Schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2013

Discovery Charter School is a parent participation, Positive Discipline based, "whole child" philosophy kind of school. This school gets top scores not because kids behind a desk all day and are "taught to take a test" but rather to learn HOW to learn vs learning WHAT to learn. The school necessitates quite a bit of involvement but people make it work, from the stay at home parent to the working full time family. I am glad that I enrolled my child in DCS and think this will be the best school option for her in this area.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 7, 2013

I find this school to be very disappointing. The students here are very entitled and have superficial views of themselves. My son is constantly bullied here. He actively pushed us to get him enrolled here and we finally did so for him. I'm sad to say my son was very disappointed here. Especially, when it sounds like such a great program. A high school linked to here (communitas) announced it was shutting down after 1 year and that is no surprise to me. I'm pretty sure last year's 8th graders didn't change at all in their ways and still act entitled. Supposedly, most of them quit. Such a shame that good schools have been ruined by rowdy kids and absent parents. We're going the homeschooling route now. Don't put any faith in this school, you'll be in for a disappointment
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 8, 2013

Great idea with poor execution. Looking at 135 reviews, most unrated, provides an uneasy feeling that a group people of interest bombarded this sight with parsing statements to increase the average rate in GreatSchool. That is really sad. Discover charter is a democratic, flexible and creative school relaying heavily on Christa Mcauliffe philosophy. Kids are encouraged to speak up their mind, spirit and ideas. Over all my son is really happy there and enjoys going to school very much. So where is the problem? Kids to not learn in Discovery charter! There are no grades, no real homework, most of the projects are done at home, no control on content and quality of teaching and teachers in general. Everyone are doing what they want or feel like in Discovery. Few of the teachers are amazing and the majority should consider a different career. This lack of control turns this school to chaotic with no academic guidance. It is nightmare for parents who have to work both during class time and at home to make sure that their kids learn something. I am planning to pull my son next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2012

The reviews for this school are all over the place because every student and their parents have their own needs. This school could be a paradise or a waste of time; it just depends on a bunch of variables such as your child's learning style, which teacher you are assigned (some of the teachers are amazing and some should consider a different career), parent involvement in your class (blessing or curse) and fund-raising (constant). If your child is capable of focusing their attention on schoolwork while some other kid is disruptive, that will help. If you can invest additional time after school to re-teach your child the academics that one would expect to learn during class, that will also help. If you can work in the classroom and field trips with other neurotic parents without rolling your eyes then you should be fine. Your mileage will vary. Be patient, invest the time it demands. Contribute to the community. Don't blame the school for your kid's challenges.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2012

The belief that giftedness should also be a factor to qualify a child for an IEP. That to me is a beautiful example of how the leadership in our school is truly innovative and creative in seking to meet the individual learning needs of each child..."Education outside of the Box" our motto in action. I feel so lucky that my children have such a beautiful school experience. It's our 5th year here and I am just as enthralled with this school as I was the first year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2012

Hi! I am an 8th grader at DCS and read two reviews below from other students (the negative ones) I just want to say I love DCS, and it has changed my views on learning, and pushs me to excel to my highest ability. I don't think we have that many rules besides safety hazards, and not eating on the field so that we don't make our beautiful school a waste land :) Compared to other schools we have like NO rules. I think that if you are looking into Discovery as an option for your child's academics that it is the best one that San Jose has to offer! Just an amazing school. So sad that I have to leave it :( will visit though as much as possible!


Posted March 17, 2012

Best school ever! I am a student here at DCS and am sad to be graduating. I will miss the everyday, hands-on experiences I have at DCS. I think the best part about my school is that it conforms to my needs. If I am learning faster than the class, they give me more challenging things to do and think about, unlike other schools that just feed you more worksheets. Or, if I'm falling behind, they reteach me. If I have a really busy schedule one week, they give me extra time for homework. The sense of community at Discovery is also a big PLUS! What each parent brings to my school is unique and useful. While learning about China in 7th grade, my friend's mom taught us how to do Chinese brush painting, experiencing the culture first hand. Out of my 3 years at DCS, I have only read 10 pages out of my social studies textbook. Social studies is great at DCS, the teachers are always throwing us into situations where we get to feel what people felt in their time and experience things hands-on. Science however, is a little more textbooky, but balanced with experiments and simulations that go WAY more in depth than the textbook. DCS provides me with experiences, and guides me to learn from them.


Posted December 27, 2011

I am a student at discovery charter school and I'm looking at the reviews and I'm seeing that all the reviews are written by parents. Well the parents aren't the ones that have to go to school everyday and learn and follow all the rules. I don't like DCS because the rules are very ridiculous. Even the slightest little mistake gets you community service and the yard duty aren't willing to listen to your explanation of the truth. This school is very ridiculous and I personally do NOT recommend this school.


Posted December 27, 2011

I am a student here who just transferred here a little while ago from Hoover Middle School. This is school is..... Well.... OK I guess, but to be honest, I rather go back to Hoover than stand one more day here. I'm sorry but that is my opinion.


Posted November 11, 2010

I love the nurturing community of parents and teachers who make our school a supportive learning environment for all students. And by participating in my sons' classrooms I get to know their classmates and make connections that I wouldn't otherwise get to make.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

907

Change from
2012 to 2013

-11

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

907

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-11

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
62%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
68%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
86%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
88%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

70 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
94%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

75 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

13 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

78 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
70%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

74 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
83%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
55%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

79 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
70%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females74%
Males48%
African Americann/a
Asian74%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)47%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner62%
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate45%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate74%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students86%
Females87%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learner92%
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate90%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females67%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner67%
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females88%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learner64%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students84%
Females95%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged84%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students83%
Females90%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females96%
Males86%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students91%
Females91%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students86%
Females83%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students78%
Females72%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino67%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students72%
Females69%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asian89%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino46%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate88%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students100%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Females83%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disability64%
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only83%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students67%
Females69%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asian79%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disability36%
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate78%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students100%
Females100%
Males100%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females85%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disability62%
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students74%
Females72%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disability31%
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students60%
Females58%
Males62%
African Americann/a
Asian64%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino14%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disability44%
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only61%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate70%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate62%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students86%
Females82%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asian93%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disability75%
Students with no reported disability89%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate89%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 42% 26%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 34% 11%
Hispanic 11% 52%
Two or more races 10% 3%
Black 3% 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 47%N/A48%
Male 53%N/A51%
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 5%N/A55%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 3%N/AN/A
Source: CRDC, 2011-2012

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Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School start time
  • 8:30am
School end time
  • 3:05pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Dale Jones
Fax number
  • (408) 243-9812

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Transportation options
  • None
School leaders can update this information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Parent involvement
  • Parent participation at discovery charter school is required. parent participation is vital to the success of a program based on small group developmental instruction. such a program's effectiveness is dependent on the commitment of every family to the philosophy of the school and the integrity of the parent participation commitment.
More from this school
  • Discovery Charter School is based on developmentally appropriate teaching methods that successfully integrate teaching that accommodates the whole child with respect to individual learning styles, developmental readiness, and rates of achievement.
School leaders can update this information here.

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4021 Teale Avenue
San Jose, CA 95117
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 243-9800

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