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GreatSchools Rating

Allen at Steinbeck School

Public | K-8 | 836 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 17 ratings

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63 reviews of this school


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Posted April 14, 2007

The school overall is adequate. The principle is open to suggestions. The library is probably the most attractive in the district. There is no tangible technology program. My son has gone once in two months. The science program is new, but the instructor is making the best effort to make it interesting and fun. There is minimal supervision for recess, which is more a district issue. The API and overall ratings have risen, mainly due to the acquisition of another high rated school last year. I hope, the trend will continue. This school has the real potential. The programs are many, and there are some sincere and dedicated instructors. There is no Music program, and the Art program is good, but the fund seems to be overcorrected to it. More funds should be directed to programs that will improve the standing of school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2007

My son is a second grade student this year at Allen. We are very lucky to have a wonderful teacher. Mrs. Unze cares so much. I am involoved in this school, and I love it. This school year has started out beautifully.
—Submitted by an administrator


Posted November 6, 2006

I am currently on a waiting list for another school. I will leave no matter when it is in the school year. They at least got a good science program going this year, only due to the parents outside the PTA forum.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 4, 2006

Our needs were not being met. The PTA was very divisive and wanted to do everything the old Allen way. The district was instrumental in ruining our neighborhood school. Bad move.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2006

I have two children at Allen at Steinbeck. 2005-2006 was the first year of the schools existence. That was a learning year for everyone, but overall it turned out very well. This year, 2006-2007 is even better. There is good leadership, good parental involvement, and everyone is striving to make this school a success. Allen at Steinbeck is on the right track and is, in my opinion, a success. My children are both excelling and they are being challenged according to their abilities. They are always at the top of their class. Check out the school yourself and ask questions. The teachers we've had, and the principal, have always been very accessible and responsive. I would not go by the negative reviews of bitter parents who did not give the school a chance, or who did not endeavor to make the school a success. Good parental involvement is essential!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2006

My child moved from Randol to Allen. The staff of both schools needed to make the transition mentally which I think they have done this year. Volunteers, instead of whining, set about bringing in needed programs. Last year, we had a little of everything. Art Vista, Music, Science Fair, science night, and much more. If the complaining parents had a positive attitude we would have cleared 800 on the API this year. As it was we made a tremendous improvement in all areas, and we hope it will be the beginning to a great future. The principal is great and was a great calming influence in all the chaos of the messy merge. If we pool our efforts positively, we can do it. My child enjoys this school.. and is an Advanced kid....reading at 3 grades above.I like this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2006

I've volunteered many hours in class, was an art docent for the Art Vistas program, and helped out whenever I had time. The teachers my children have had at Allen have been wonderful and my kids have been at the top of their class. The only worry I have is the large number of kids and then adding middle school to the mix. I love the addition of the science program. Overall, I can't complain because I know what my kids are doing and I add to that at home, because that is what we should be doing as parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2006

We came from another district. Outgoing parents were discouraged when it came to developing programs for GATE or school enrichment. Thanks to SJUSD for ruining our neighborhood school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 19, 2006

Wow! I am so proud of our students at Allen at Steinbeck. Our school had the second highest improvement in overall test scores in the SJUSD this past year. The number of parents volunteering in the classrooms has increased dramatically this year; our first dance was heavily attended; our Art Vistas program has moved into a permanent classroom inside the main building; our school has hired a resource teacher who runs a science classroom and a science lab for every student. We have, in addition to the Mac lab, laptop computers that the teachers can check out and use in each classroom. We love our school, our teachers and our principals! Go Gators!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2006

My daughter went from being an top student at Randol Elementary to a just above basic. She went down in every catagory. At Randol, she read 24 books in the 4th grade, and at Allen, only 4, due to the lack approach to basic AR reading techniques. Let's hope the new year brings a new approach to learning, and lifeskills.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2006

Try to get on a waiting list, any list, private, charter, or home school. This school will take at least three years to recover from, a very bad SJUSD experiment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2006

My daughter had a good experience, although her overall testing went down. The staff was excellent though, and made up for other challenges the year brought. Overall, she was prepared for 6th grade, but barely. There could of been an improvement in the interaction between the two PTA's merging, or in the case of Randol, being dissolved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 23, 2006

Allen at Steinbeck is a school that is still in the developmental phase. Since we are about to embark on another year with a school in the ever changing facilty a lot has changed. Last year was a bumpy ride when the closed Randol students became a part of the Allen population. Everyone was adapting. Some had positive experiences and some had negative. Personally we had a good one, for the fact that I remembered it was not about me and it was about my child. Those who were hostile did not accept that, and thus their animosity grew. In regard to the volunteers around the campus. Once the schools became one it was not about where they came from, but about how those helping could make a difference in a child's life. Truly in the end that is all that matters.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 15, 2006

Well, wow, after reading the reviews I can tell most parents have a really good experience with previous schools. If you think allen elem. is substandard, you haven't been to many other san jose schools. We find it to be stellar in comparison. By combining more schools, they might have enough money for extra curricular activities. The problem is taxpayers not wanting to foot the bill for good schools. We are thrilled with allen at this time and hope it continues to improve. My grandson is doing fantastically better in every way compared to his former san jose school. And on the topic of safety, their organized approaches to supervising kids entering school is lightyears safer than the prior san jose school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 7, 2006

The merging of two schools into Allen at Steinbeck has not been very successful. There are too many students and not enough staff to effectively monitor student behavior.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2006

Allen has great programs in place for the kids, but lack the teacher training to implement them successfully. Seems to be a bias against children with special needs. On 2 occasions I've had the VP and a paid yard duty comment about 'those Special Ed kids' negatively. If you have those opinions, you shouldn't offer programs to help them. I've experienced on 3 occasions staff speaking inappropriately to children with no consequence. If you question the VP of the school communication diminishes to personal attacks, or confusion, with no sense of even wanting teamwork for the benefit of the children and no resolution of issues. The teachers need the training, before they practice on the students. Lead with experience, not a do as I say, not as I do, mentality. There is hope for Allen, however, changes are necessary before success can be achieved. Respect is earned, not just given.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2006

I subbed for this school, and found that some of the staff member were not very encouraging.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 22, 2006

The quality of the academic programs is terrible. There is no emphasis on improving test scores or the mindset of the faculty relating to improving the programs or lack there of. There are no music programs, art is minimal and the P.E. programs has been temporarily cut back because of the lack of teaching credentials. The level of parent involvement is very minimal unless you count the parents that cam from the now closed Randol Elementary. If it wasn't for a select few Allen parents (actual PTA Board members) the only volunters would be Randol parents. The Randol volunteers are devoting countless hours teaching reading, art, some music and doing what they can to improve the schol.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2006

It's too big. There is a lack of discipline. There are no extracurricular activities. The good teachers are quitting.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2006

The school needs more after-school and science programs. Randol had a science teacher and a music teacher. Academic expectations and home work load should be much more challenging!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

760

Change from
2012 to 2013

-19

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

760

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-19

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

4 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
36%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
40%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
44%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

104 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
66%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
60%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

103 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
52%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
50%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

101 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
61%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

53 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
49%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
53%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
30%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
21%

2012

 
 
17%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
43%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students38%
Females40%
Males35%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)43%
Economically disadvantaged27%
Non-economically disadvantaged49%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner21%
Fluent-English proficient and English only45%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduate35%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)43%
Parent education - college graduate48%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students43%
Females43%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino35%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)43%
Economically disadvantaged28%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learner32%
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate17%
Parent education - high school graduate37%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)48%
Parent education - college graduate56%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students40%
Females44%
Males33%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino26%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)53%
Economically disadvantaged32%
Non-economically disadvantaged47%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner9%
Fluent-English proficient and English only48%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented75%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate31%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students64%
Females65%
Males62%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantaged71%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner52%
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate69%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students62%
Females70%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner38%
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduate44%
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students75%
Females83%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino65%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented88%
Parent education - not a high school graduate44%
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)94%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students53%
Females55%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asian73%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged45%
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learner25%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented86%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate48%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate43%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students38%
Females38%
Males38%
African Americann/a
Asian73%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)50%
Economically disadvantaged33%
Non-economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability38%
English learner35%
Fluent-English proficient and English only39%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented93%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate30%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduate39%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students33%
Females19%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asian53%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino16%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)52%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantaged40%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability33%
English learner15%
Fluent-English proficient and English only37%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented64%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate26%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)34%
Parent education - college graduate26%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate50%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females71%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged57%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)67%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students28%
Females23%
Males33%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino21%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged38%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability29%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only31%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)31%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students45%
Females41%
Males50%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino31%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged25%
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only56%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate17%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)63%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students33%
Females26%
Males40%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino19%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Non-economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability31%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only38%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate0%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students21%
Females28%
Males14%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino18%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged23%
Non-economically disadvantaged14%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability21%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only22%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)20%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students56%
Females44%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged62%
Non-economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students45%
Females33%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino42%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged46%
Non-economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability46%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only46%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students58%
Females50%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged65%
Non-economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)65%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 50% 51%
White 22% 27%
Asian 13% 11%
Black 7% 7%
Two or more races 7% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 50%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Melinda Waller
Fax number
  • (408) 535-2329

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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820 Steinbeck Drive
San Jose, CA 95123
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 535-6205

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