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GreatSchools Rating

Merritt Trace Elementary School

Public | K-5 | 957 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 13 ratings

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42 reviews of this school


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Posted February 7, 2014

Highs: - Strong PTO, but just low participation from parents. It's the same few parents that you see at all the events and activities. - Performing arts program is very strong with great teachers - Certain teachers are very committed to their jobs, you have to know which ones they are. Lows: - Administration isn't very strong or diverse, and many times not available for help. - Focus is on bringing up kids who are low on performance, at the expense of kids who have potential and need to be more challenged. - Not very much focus on cultural diversity education because of such high concentration of certain ethnic backgrounds. - Bullying is a big issue at this school. - Classes are at capacity, mostly 30 to a room, with no in class support except for parent volunteers. - No programs for special needs or gifted and talented education. - Need to update their communications, seem to waste a lot of paper and efforts on sending out multiple notices, seems very inefficient and costly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 10, 2013

The comment about hiring Keith Woodhouse is way off! The school administration is completely separate from the private after school program that hired him. Furthermore, the problem was that Woodhouse's previous employers have him positive work references, instead of reporting him to the police. This allowed unsuspecting child care organizations to hire him. I was actually impressed with how the after school program administration got this guy arrested quickly. It's a terrible situation, but it occurred because the Catholic school and day camps where he worked previously failed to do what's right and allowed other children to become victims. Trace is a good school, it has some issues, a big one is the principal Mrs. Rocha, who has no leadership skills, does not handle bullying properly, and does not work well with parents. The music, arts, drama, and two-way bilingual program are great. And so are the teachers and other staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 9, 2013

This school has very bad bullying issues and doesnt resolve them tell they found out I was pulling my son out of that school, staff in the office are very rude
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2013

This school's administration is awful!!! They have no idea what they are doing. The parents here are very snobby/cliquey. If your child has any kind of special needs DO NOT SEND HIM/HER HERE. They will be treated poorly by administrators and other parents, and you will have a had time fighting for the services your child might need. Some of the teachers here are excellent - I feel sorry they have to teach at a substandard school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2012

We chose Trace with some trepidation given its relatively low API test scores and ranking. (On API data, look beyond the average at the demographic splits - these show some of the challenges the school faces.) We are now a few months into the kindergarten year and so far so good! We're delighted to be part of the Two Way Bilingual Immersion (TWBI) Program and are pleased with our child's progress and teachers. We also like the community feel of the TWBI program. The fact that Trace offers the Spanish immersion program is not well known - if it were, I suspect the school reputation would improve tremendously and parents would be taking part in lotteries for their kids to get into the immersion program as is the case in many other bay area immersion schools. We also appreciate the art, drama and music programs and look forward to 3rd grade band and orchestra - the opportunity to get a well rounded education that includes the arts is unfortunately a rare treat in today's elementary schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2012

Based on 2 class levels so far, K & 1st grade in the Two Way Bilingual Program, we are quite happy with both the program and the school. While the principal seems to be operating under crisis mode, and sometimes treading water, her spirit is unrelenting, in her efforts to make Trace a better school. The teachers we have met, including not only the grade level teachers in K & 1st, but also the Drama, Music & Art teacher (yes imagine that a school with dedicated arts teachers!) have been truly phenomenal, And the parental involvement, especially within the Two Way Bilingual Program, is incredible. It has given our family a chance to come out of our own cultural comfort zone to meet more folks and watch our child becomes fluent in English AND Spanish. Already a few short weeks into 1st grade, our child's ability in Spanish far outstrips most of us who learned foreign language in HS. The immersion part of the program starts off a bit challenging but has been amazingly effective for both the native and non-native English speakers in the class. Active parents get amazing results here at Trace, But don't just read the reviews, contact the PTO & meet some parents to get a better picture.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2012

We're leaving the school this year. Our son is going into fourth, and he is middle of the pack, but has already been identified as one that won't move in the quartiles--so the teacher will just let him move along, uninspired. A kid has to be special to even make the radar. The teachers have to guess what kids have potential to move from below avg to avg or from average to above average. I tried volunteering inthe classroom, but when I grading math papers, the teacher gave a list of "hopeless" kids and told me not waste my time on their papers. Apparently, the principal said they can't afford to help those kids, they have to try to Improve their state test scores. The bottom three scores are thrown out. I guess it's no child left behind except the three who need it... Trace is morbidly managed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 23, 2011

For low-income kids who need extra help, Trace has put an emphasis on helping them through the VIA program in 2011-12. But it's at the expense of making sure that there is help in the classroom; and ending a parental involvement program without consulting parents is an irony that wasn't lost on parents -- or the reporters who covered the story in spring 2011. Increased class sizes are no doubt a contributor toward school desk scores dropping for the last couple years, though one can't help but wonder if the tinkering the school district was doing with the parental-involvement program also caused unintended negative results there. For talented and more advanced kids, Trace has increasingly become a holding tank, with teachers at the upper grades admitting that they have to give kids "busy-work" and P.E. consisting of running laps. On paper there is a program for gifted/talented students, but it does not exist in reality. Right now the VIA program doesn't seem open to a "How can we improve?" mentality -- perhaps more outreach and serious evaluation of it, and of the principal, by parents would give an honest assessment of how to earn back the trust of the community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2011

Trace is a Diamond in the Rough. While it is true, the PIE Program, Parent Involvement in Education, has changed, it is for a good reason. So many parents were excluded in the old PIE program. Now, with VIA (Volunteers in Action), all parents can participate. By recognizing the impact parents can make on their child's education at home, students have a chance to succeed. The education gap is not going to resolve unless parents get involved in their child's education. Teachers are a only a part of the equation. I have been involved with the VIA program and feel that although the Principal is not Hillary Clinton, she listens and cares enough to make changes that result in quality learning. The Superintendent cares enough to poll the parents and community to try to make a lasting difference. Who does that? I do know people that have left Trace because the PIE program changed. Had they stayed, they would have seen that in the first 90 days of school, the program has over three times the involvement it had last year. That is pretty amazing for a school that burned down and had so many problems last year. That speaks volumes for the spirit of parents at Trace.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2011

Trace school is not the school it once was years ago. The teachers are overwhelmed,they lack leaderdhip and personal skills. The administration doesn't care. The school is overcrowded and they do not seem to care about the safety of children. They don't monitor anything that goes on in their campus . Including aftetschool care. My children were assaulted at the afterschool daycare on Trace property. The principal,district,and the teacher showed lack of compassion. My children are no longer in that school and they were behind when they moved to a new school and there were things Trace should've been teaching that they weren't. My kids are now safe and at the top of their class and are finally getting the education they deserve. Trace needs to be shut down they are below standards!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2011

Our children attended Trace for several years. The administration is singularly focused on low achievement scores and the school is languishing in multiple years of program improvement status. Now that we are in a new school (and district) it is clear that the curriculum at Trace was significantly below average -- our children that tested "advanced" at Trace are considered "behind" in the basics at their new school. In this age of school funding cuts, the arts and drama programs at Trace are a plus. We experienced a broad range of teachers - from the exceptional to the uninspired. There is also a small group of committed parents that are trying to maintain a sense of community there, but they suffer from a lack of support from the principal and the district. With the dismantling of the Parent Involvement (PIE) program and more parents fleeing this year, I'm afraid Trace is just another failing urban school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2011

This school was really improving about 3 years ago. With the current principal and the abolition of the wildly popular PIE program it's now in it's second year of Program Improvement. Under the NCLB act, any child living within its attendance boundaries is entitled to a transfer to a better school. Use your rights!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 2, 2011

We moved to this area last year and this school year was my daughter's first year at Trace Elementary. I absolutely love this school. It is true things have been a little disorganized but many things have happened at Trace this year that have caused disruption. I think the administrators have handled it fairly well. It has been a tough year and the kids really need us to pull things together. I was also part of PIE and I loved spending Mondays there to help the teachers and kids out. The children especially benefit from PIE and parents involved. Next year I would like to see more parents involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2011

Trace is in a period of transition - due in part to NCLB and massive state funding cuts - and unfortunately the principal is not up to the challenge. Trace will lose its very successful Parent Involvement program next year, which is a huge loss. Class sizes are way too large (30 students in all classes K-5) and communication with parents is poor. The teachers are excellent, but they do not have the resources or the leadership they need to make a real difference, either for below-level kids or for kids who are above average. Also, I was very disappointed to find that at the art, music, and drama school, my son (in kindergarten) received none of the above from March-June. Pros include an awesome drama program and excellent instruction (when they get it) in music and art, and a lovely campus. And the new TWBI program is one of the best things going for Trace at the moment. But the cons outweigh the pros and we are starting to look for alternatives.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2011

Trace seemed to go down-hill for the last 2-4 years prior to this year. I believe the new principal is doing wonders to put things back in order. Unfortunately it can't be done overnight. As for the students performing under grade level, the after-school tutoring program was a good idea, but once again, I think it is a matter of trial and error before finding a GOOD tutoring program. My third-grade daughter participated in one of the tutoring programs this year and did not benefit from it, at all. I have not yet decided as to whether we should stay at Trace (I fear her falling further behind) or attempt another school. My final thought is: Trace has potential and is on the right track, though it will take some time before seeing the results. Since my daughter is below grade level, I don't have the flexibility to wait for the positive changes to take place!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 27, 2011

We have been at Trace for three years, and are not planning to return next year. The administration is very weak. As other parents have commented all the focus of the administration is on getting test scores up; no effort is spent to challenge or inspire kids who are performing at or above level. There is a lot of bullying on the playground and very little supervision. We would really liked to have stayed at our neighborhood school, but have had enough.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2011

We have been at Trace Elementary for many years. It was our choice and still is. We are apart of the parent involvement in education program(PIE). This is what brought us to Trace. The wonderful part about the PIE program, you can put your hours in however it works for your family. I volunteer in my children's classroom weekly. This allows the teacher to be able to pull small groups of children to read and do individual testing. This helps all of the children. We have had a wonderful experience with all of the teachers. They are fantastic !! Another wonderful thing Trace has is the arts, music and drama departments. The teachers are amazing. Every child performance yearly in a play. What a great experience for them. My children love it. We are so lucky to have a new theatre. From third- fitth grade, they can take electives-early morning drama, playing an instrument or choir. Not only are my children receiving a good education, they are also very well rounded. We are very happy with our school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2011

My family has been at Trace for 4 years and my 2 very different children are both happy and thriving there. I love the proximity (it's my neighborhood school) and I have found the staff to be dedicated, caring, and professional. Despite its large size, Trace has a safe, community feel to me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 28, 2011

We have been attending Trace for 3 years, and we really liked it in the beginning, but it has gone down hill recently. The school is so focused on meeting the minimum standards and making their AYP (Annual Yearly Progress) numbers as set by No Child Left Behind, that they have lost sight of their responsibility to teach all the children. The district and the administration have been only modesty committed to making changes and many parents seem frustrated and ready to go somewhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2011

We sent our child here for a brief period of time and were very disappointed. The staff was disorganized and didn't seem to care about the students. The teacher was overwhelmed and wasn't effective in inspiring the class. If you want your child to merely get CA state mandated worksheets and minimal encouragement, then this is the school for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

751

Change from
2012 to 2013

-56

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet its schoolwide API target for 2013.
  • This school has not yet met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

751

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-56

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

5 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

5 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
58%

2011

 
 
49%

2010

 
 
51%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

154 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

155 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
52%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

136 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
63%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

147 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

147 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

146 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
51%

2010

 
 
54%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students32%
Females36%
Males27%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino22%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantaged21%
Non-economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability32%
English learner22%
Fluent-English proficient and English only42%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate16%
Parent education - high school graduate11%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduate47%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate70%
Parent education - declined to state25%

Math

All Students41%
Females44%
Males36%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino33%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged30%
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability41%
English learner35%
Fluent-English proficient and English only47%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate38%
Parent education - high school graduate24%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)42%
Parent education - college graduate53%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate65%
Parent education - declined to state25%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students49%
Females54%
Males42%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino34%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged26%
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learner5%
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented78%
Parent education - not a high school graduate10%
Parent education - high school graduate52%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)63%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate79%
Parent education - declined to state33%

Math

All Students65%
Females65%
Males66%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged49%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learner39%
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented93%
Parent education - not a high school graduate44%
Parent education - high school graduate62%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to state50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students58%
Females67%
Males51%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Economically disadvantaged51%
Non-economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability58%
English learner43%
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented87%
Parent education - not a high school graduate50%
Parent education - high school graduate43%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduate73%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students76%
Females76%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino74%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented94%
Parent education - not a high school graduate71%
Parent education - high school graduate61%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students51%
Females66%
Males31%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino41%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Non-economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability53%
English learner7%
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented75%
Parent education - not a high school graduate28%
Parent education - high school graduate50%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate79%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to state48%

Math

All Students48%
Females55%
Males39%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino36%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability51%
English learner23%
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented85%
Parent education - not a high school graduate41%
Parent education - high school graduate41%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)59%
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to state42%

Science

All Students26%
Females28%
Males23%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino16%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged13%
Non-economically disadvantaged53%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability28%
English learner2%
Fluent-English proficient and English only36%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented53%
Parent education - not a high school graduate16%
Parent education - high school graduate7%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate36%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate58%
Parent education - declined to state16%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 63% 51%
White 20% 27%
Asian 7% 11%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Black 3% 7%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 52%N/A54%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mary Martinez
Fax number
  • (408) 535-2304

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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651 Dana Avenue
San Jose, CA 95126
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 535-6257

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