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GreatSchools Rating

Don Callejon School

Public | K-8 | 925 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 8 ratings
2012:
Based on 12 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

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357 reviews of this school


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Posted June 2, 2014

My kids have been in the school since it opened 8 years ago so we have gone through both the elementary and middle schools. Fantastic teachers along the way. They have had many opportunities to connect with teachers and create a sense of community they would not have had in a bigger school. Their individual test scores and academic achievements have been stellar. We don't worry about the school test scores as a group. There are too many variables which contribute to high and low scoring. We all embrace and appreciate the socioeconomic and ethnic diversity. Music and arts program could use attention.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2014

I've been going to this school since it opened, and it's my last year at DC. Although I will admit that it's not perfect, it is not as bad as others are making it out to be! If you are judging a school based on test scores and certain students' behavior, I can't try to change your opinion. But I can tell you that not every kid at school is a good test taker, and not every kid acts like a saint every second of the school day! Especially at our age, parents, peers, and other adults can't expect perfect, smiling students in class every morning. Everyone slips up, and you can't blame that on Don Callejon alone. So for those who don't like the middle school because of rumors they've heard, I will tell you, it's going to be like that at every middle school you go to, and will only get worse in high school. If anything, this diverse school prepares kids for the real world more than any charter or private school.


Posted October 1, 2013

I have 4 boys attending DCS from K to middle school. The teachers are great, they actually care about their students and teaching. They communicate with you. We as parents have to be involved in our kids education, and ask questions or any concerns you may have, and reach out to teachers. They are great at getting back to you with and will address them as need be. Glad to see the API score go up..
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2013

This school is full of politics and egos of few people...... Most of the kids once their parents realize how bad their standard is move to the Magnolia Charter School or move to private schools...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2013

Glad to see the API score go up. As much as Hans Barber is missed, we welcome Ms. Martinez and the strong educational background she brings to DCS. Go Cubs!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2013

Great news to see the API go up .It is a very good school with very modern facilities and excellent teachers.Hoping to see the middle school score go up too. It will happen when we believe in the teachers at middle school level and encourage our kids to excel in academics .If the entire fifth grade move up the middle school this is bound to happen.Why move kids somewhere else when you have great school in your community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 29, 2013

I have seen the good and bad in this school and have read some of the negative opinions on the school and I think they are valid if you focused on the academics of middle school which are lacking. You can look at the breakdown of the scores. For some students and parents which aren't concerned about it, it works out fine but for some parents and students, alternatives such as charter or private schools fulfilled their needs better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2013

Okay school. The facilities are good, but bullying is a problem here and needs to be prevented.


Posted January 30, 2013

After thirty years of teaching experience, I'm glad that I landed at Don Callejon! This K-12 school is a real community with teachers and staff at all levels working together to ensure the best possible education for a diverse group of students. Many of the upper and lower grades form partnerships work together four or five times a year. Administration strives to create positive atmosphere where both safety and success are emphasized. Teachers make themselves available to help students during lunches and after school. We provide enrichment with leadership, yearbook, orchestra, drama club, Odyssey of the Mind, Spanish, karate, Chess Club, and Reading Circles. Children at Callejon also benefit from having a very active parent and community support group that pays for such things as arts education, field trips, software licensing, video licensing, technology for the classrooms, and extra staff to monitor recess play. I am very proud to wear my Callejon Cubs staff t-shirt!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 29, 2013

Don Callejon is far from Perfect. The Elementary classes are pretty good, on par with other Santa Clara elementary schools. (Which are all pretty good) However, the big downside to this school are the middle school grades. Students are disrespectful, and many of the teachers don't seem to care. Issues of bullying are ignored by the administrative staff which seems to lack the courage to do what needs to be done. If you have a choice in Middle Schools, I suggest you look to Buchser. (Cabrillo and Peterson are also better alternatives.) Please note, I have experience working at each of these schools.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 14, 2012

Wow! The only thing my parents deprived me of by taking me out of this horrible middle school is bullying, humiliation and not learning anything. Going to the new charter is the best thing they have ever done for me. I have fun and look forward to going to school now. I also am actually being taught something now. Callejon teachers are fine but they waste half of the day dealing with students who do not care about learning or behaving. I fit in at Magnolia and do not have to worry about bullying, drugs and inappropriate behavior. I guess I am deprived not learning about those things instead of what I should be learning at school. This is part of the problem at callejon a few kids are treated better than the rest because of who their parents are. Even us kids know it. So I apologize for my parents not making you happy and thinking about my education and safety instead of you and your child. Because this is what we are suppose to do at Callejon, make things more comfortable for Rivermark children at every other students expense.


Posted November 14, 2012

I agree with much of what has been said about the negatives about the school. For those parents who have stayed in middle school, I can only ask that you really look at it objectively instead of saying it subjectively that the middle school will get better and the truth is that it won't. Standards have dropped shockingly from their elementary levels, look at the API scores and star test scores for those level and you can see it there. It is unfortunate but the comments about favoritism is shockingly ttrue where administration and teachers do not take actions against certain parents and certain parents are chummy with parents because that puts any teacher in a tough position when they have to chastise or punish those parents' kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 2, 2012

This school started off on a great note with parent & community enthusiasm to build a great K-8. However, somehow over the last year or so its lost the vision to arrogance, cliques and head-in-the-sand mentality. The teachers threw up their hands with additional kids in the classes due to budget cuts and make this an excuse for doing the bare minimum. The Principal & staff have a "take-it-or-leave-it" stance to feedback growing out of the boundary war which led them to believe they were the only good school in Santa Clara. Now that most of the involved parents & high performing kids are leaving for Magnolia Charter, they hopefully will wake up & smell the coffee. A lot of bullying by kids and also by a small coterie of "insider parents" make this school a hotbed of politics and the very antithesis of a community building school that traditional public schools have been.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 26, 2012

This school is not by any means ideal. The school is too open. Any random people can walk around. Teachers .. well we've only seen the kindergarten .. horrible! We took are child out of that school QUICK
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2012

I am a parent of a middle schooler, as well as a high schooler who attended middle school here. Callejon is a fabulous school with teachers and administrators who go out of their way to help students excel in both academic and extra curricular endeavors. The K-8 environment is excellent and allows middle schoolers to feel good about being a role model.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2012

This school has just gotten worse the last few years. Rezoning has done nothing but make it that way. The blatant favoritism for certain parents and students is stopping, and will continue to stop the school from reaching the possible potential it once had. Better to send your middle school child to Magnolia. This site might be new and shiny but it is broken and probably cannot be fixed until the district wakes up and makes major changes and makes it clear it is a public school and does not belong to a few individuals. But that will never happen, so this school will continue to decline. 30+ students in the course of 7 weeks leaving a middle school of only 370 makes it clear this school is broken and needs major fixing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 26, 2012

If you only care about new building then you should send your child to this school, but if you really care about your child's future and his eduction then this school is not a good place for him. One evidence of the school standard and worst environment is that most parents of the 5th grade kids decided to move their kids out of this school and send them to nearby charter school. Even the former school PTA president move their kids to that charter school. Bullying issues are common place at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2012

School run by a select group of parents. The same parents allowed to bully and talk bad about other parents in front of kids during school time without consequences. If you don't live at the correct address you and your child will be treated like you do not belong. It's why many are leaving and sending their children to the new charter school, where education and safety of the kids is important and not neighborhood boundaries or personal politics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2012

Bad school ever this teachers didn't teach my son who is in 7th grade. Don't give homework and teacher. The whole middle school is a fail.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2012

I am a parent of a 1st grade student in this school. My son is much happier in this school than his previous private school. He is challenged in school on a regular basis. He is progressing extremely well in DCS. Parents who, also, live in the Rivermark Community that sends their kids to private schools should take a second look at this school.This school is doing lots of things to improve the quality of the education, re-zoning was a big part of it. Since the re-zoning grades K-5 is rated 10. In a short few years this school should be a 10 overall. The school is going through a filtering process. We have looked at schools in Cupertino, Palo Alto, which has great schools, DCS's quality of education is no different. Parents in Rivermark should take time to checkout the school yourselves, ask the teachers questions, ask the principle questions then compare with what you are currently getting in the private school. Bottom line, our son went to a private school and now he is in DCS with excellent progress. He is able to do more now than his previous classmates who is currently in the private school. The reviews about politics is silly, were you zoned out? Sorry?
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

868

Change from
2012 to 2013

+7

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

868

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+7

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

8 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
80%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

108 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

93 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

72 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
82%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

73 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
75%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
69%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

64 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
65%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
47%

2010

 
 
45%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

22 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
81%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
54%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
60%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
42%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
29%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
44%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

92 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
54%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
4%

2012

 
 
11%

2011

 
 
19%

2010

 
 
18%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

14 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

99 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
49%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
42%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

90 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Females86%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino38%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learner85%
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females86%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian98%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino56%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learner92%
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females86%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asian95%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino54%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged47%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students90%
Females88%
Males93%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino69%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learner78%
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females92%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learner58%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students89%
Females90%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino73%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate97%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate87%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students88%
Females94%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged64%
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate82%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students90%
Females94%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students93%
Females90%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantaged82%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students61%
Females70%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learner25%
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate45%
Parent education - high school graduate59%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)61%
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students36%
Females34%
Males38%
African Americann/a
Asian76%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino17%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)55%
Economically disadvantaged25%
Not economically disadvantaged55%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability36%
English learner14%
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented93%
Parent education - not a high school graduate15%
Parent education - high school graduate26%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)36%
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students96%
Females93%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only100%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students61%
Females57%
Males66%
African Americann/a
Asian83%
Filipino83%
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner33%
Fluent-English proficient and English only69%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduate44%
Parent education - high school graduate46%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students38%
Females33%
Males42%
African Americann/a
Asian58%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino29%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged29%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability39%
English learner29%
Fluent-English proficient and English only41%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate25%
Parent education - high school graduate26%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)41%
Parent education - college graduate59%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students58%
Females53%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino52%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged58%
Not economically disadvantaged57%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability57%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only57%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate71%
Parent education - high school graduate36%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students58%
Females55%
Males61%
African Americann/a
Asian88%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino48%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged48%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learner14%
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate38%
Parent education - high school graduate57%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students4%
Femalesn/a
Males0%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino7%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged5%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disability0%
Students with no reported disability8%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only6%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Students92%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only93%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students54%
Females47%
Males62%
African Americann/a
Asian78%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantaged76%
Students with disability8%
Students with no reported disability62%
English learner16%
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate46%
Parent education - high school graduate54%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)50%
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students64%
Females52%
Males77%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino53%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learner50%
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduate55%
Parent education - high school graduate62%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)55%
Parent education - college graduate72%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
Asian 41%
Hispanic 30%
White 10%
Two or more races 7%
Black 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 36%N/AN/A
English language learners 26%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 3%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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4176 Lick Mill Boulevard
Santa Clara, CA 95054
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 423-3300

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