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GreatSchools Rating

Washington Elementary School

Public | K-5

 
 

Living in Santa Clara

Situated in an urban neighborhood. The median home value is $472,300. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,420.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 9 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted May 9, 2014

My family absolutely loves Washington Open! We've always educated our kids using the "learning through play" style. We went to a parent participation preschool for 3 years and then onto Washington Open. I was told by a few other non-WO parents that my children would not receive a good educational foundation here, as there really is no academic structure. Well, after a few years at this school, my children are both excelling at academics and socially. They aren't afraid to ask questions and they love the field trips and how hands on the learning is. Thank you WO for providing my kids with a great learning environment!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2013

We came to this school attracted by the whole child philosophy. The kindergarten was great; the teachers were organized and responsible. In 1st grade the things changed for worse and they stayed worse through 2nd gr. The teacher was not helping the kids realize their whole potential; she worked only with the kids who needed most help so the others were left get bored and to do whatever; any kid with academic potential was unchallenged and withered. While trying to convince parents that the whole child philosophy does not include academics she didn't do much on the social aspect either: many kids were disrespectful to parents and even to the teacher; the class was very noisy and disorganized. They should do the parent/teacher conference at the end of the year too to see how much was accomplished. None of the goals set at the beginning of the year was ever accomplished. No wonder then the API of 4 for 2nd grade this year, it is on par with the education delivered I am so sad that these two years in my child s life were a waste of time. No wonder many families left for better schools. 1st and 2nd grade at WO were more like a daycare but not a place of education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2012

My child attended WO for Kindergarten and first grade, this year we have moved out of state and are attending a more traditional, academic school. I love WO and miss it a lot. I enjoyed working with the kids and getting to know all of them. I loved the community spirit and I felt genuine warmth and caring towards myself and my child from all the staff and teachers I met. I love the center style small group learning at WO that allows teachers regular 1-on-1 time with the kids, classroom flexibility for fun and interactive projects, and allows kids to learn from many different types of activities. They also get plenty of socialization time. It was a fun and happy place to be. I can't speak to the academics of the upper grades. I think parent involvement (supplementation) is always a must regardless of the school type. I felt the K-1st activities provided a foundational understanding of numbers, and promoted a love of writing and reading. The children learn more from interacting with numbers, words, people, and problems in different ways than from direct instruction. Our new academic school gets great test scores but doesn't inspire my love (yet).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 14, 2012

I am very disappointed with WO!!!! Both of my kids were there since Kinder...and I just pull them out this year. The whole child concept is great, but my children isn't whole because they didn't have the academic side of it. There are good teachers and not so good either, but more missed placed than anything. If you have kids that is going into third grade...good luck. You need to supplement a lot at home. They don't teach them anything..!!! Oh don't even think about bringing it up to the principal...she won't help, but make it your problem to deal with. The teachers are way too entiled there. I was disappointed to say the least. From what I heard and experienced...WO was a good school that has gone down hill.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2012

I am surprised by the response of parents to a neg. review. I think that while some of what the person said might be from personal feelings, I don't think that you can count it out. WO is NOT academic . The reason children do well on Star is because of parents who supplement at home. The teachers have gotten a little lazy and feel entitled. I have heard 3rd grade teachers say they don't get paid enough to put up with the class. I find that interesting since santa clara teachers are the 5th hightest paid in the state. I think that we can be both acedemic and social, it doesn't have to be one or the other. I also think that the principal is more worried about her image than making sure that her teachers do their jobs.The only way you can make it a better school is to acknowledge the problems and find solutions, sticking your head in the sand and pretending the school is perfect is not the option. I also resent the notion that if you disagree then its not the school for you, That is like saying there is no room for discuss. & change. Lets not forget that WO was started by parents who wanted change and a better learning environment for their child, that didn't mean sacrafice education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2012

As a parent of Washington Open, I am very surprised by some of the negative reviews, but everyone is entitled to their opinion. This has not been our experience at all. WO is not a place were as parents you are always going to get your way, but we have found the school to be very fair and balanced with all decisions. We have found the teachers and staff to be very professional; concerned that our children are getting the best all round education not just academics, but social and emotional, and learning life/people skills that will serve them for the rest of their lives. This has been a great fit for our children, a caring fun environment where children are allowed to learn with teachers that truly care about our children s development. I have found the Principal to take charge and deal with all issues that arise and not sweep anything under the table or to ignore them no matter what the issue may be. WO is a unique environment for learning that may not be right for everyone, but it has been a wonderful fun experience for our children. Oh and they are learning a lot, both academically and in developing life s skills, the end result will be successful adults.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 11, 2012

As a parent at WO, I am very disheartened by the recent reviews of our school. If academics is what your family values most in an elementary school, then WO may not be a good fit,but if you are looking for a school that looks at each child as an individual&sees potential in who they can become&provides an environment that can help guide them to reach their full potential,then yes WO is the place to be. Admittedly, academics aren't aggressively pursued, but then again the test scores aren't too shabby either. WO provides the right mix of emotional, social,&personal growth interspersed with the 'traditional' academic program,WO after all still has to meet state standards. What they are doing though, is meeting those standards while also teaching our 'future' how to think out side of the box. This includes how to communicate effectively with a wide variety of people,how to have their voice heard&needs met without being afraid of authority. Yes, to some, that may seem 'disrespectful', but taken in the context of it being a life skill they will use always, isn't it really a gift we are giving them? So to all that feel that their children are 'suffering' I wish you the best of luck.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2012

I am also a parent from Washington Open. I agree that the school is not strong in academics and I also agree that there are some wonderful teachers and below average teachers. However, I strongly disagree that children are being groomed to be unmotivated, disrespectful citizens from the previous review. I have known this family at the school for a while. The mom is always late (always more than 15 minutes late) picking up her son and the dad simply just doesn't do too much with the boy. The boy is the most disrespectful kid I have ever met in my life. We as parents need to teach our kids to respect us and others. When the kids are constantly being ignored at home, you will of course have an unmotivated and disrespectful child at home and school because they are craving for the attention. The person who wrote the previous review maybe need to look into the environment he or she is providing instead of blaming the school. Most of the children I met at the school are very respectful, loving, and sweet.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 6, 2012

As a parent of 2 children at WO (3rd&4th), I feel very disappointed at the lack of academics that my children are getting. I am expected to do 110%at the school, but then I also need to do 110% at home to keep them academically on par. This wouldn't be so much of an issue if the whole child philosophy was adhered to, but unfortunately it isn't. My children are being groomed to be unmotivated,disrespectful citizens and I feel that this is not the school for us. What sealed the deal was my year long tenure on the parent board. This parent board which should be representative of the parents/families at WO really is just a few people who like to hear themselves talk. The high and mighty attitudes get in the way of real issues that are facing this school, such as bullying, a principal that doesn't do anything by way of leading, teachers that can't teach much less control the class they have. I'm so disappointed that I let my children suffer at the hands of the whole child philosophy for so long. My only hope is that I can get them in a school that can truly meet their needs and help other families make a informed choice of elementary school. best of luck, a very concerned parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 2, 2012

The school's whole child philosophy is great in theory, but unfortunately the reality doesn't match the school's philosophy. There are issues with bullying that are not adequately addressed, I agree with the 3rd grade parent where the "principal encourages everyone to trust the intention" but she is not giving us a reason to trust her intention. These (many) incidents of bullying have been brought to her attention, but that's where it ended. No action taken and the problem still exists. To trust the intention is one thing when your child is safe and feels safe, but in all honesty, that 'intention' can't be trusted when not all of the children are feeling safe. Here is where the "whole child" philosophy gets lost.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 25, 2012

I'm giving the school two stars because third grade was so disappointing and difficult. The school's "whole child" philosophy is great, but some of the teachers and the principal's behavior do not match the philosophy. The K-2 grade teachers were kind, patient, and pretty effective at classroom management. However, third grade was chaotic; the third grade teachers were sometimes unprepared or only half prepared with lessons (this is very frustrating when you are working in the classroom). One teacher often gave verbal instructions, and then changed her mind about the instructions half way through giving them. The students AND parents were often confused by this. Consistent written instructions would have been helpful. She didn't consistently use the classroom management tools, so the classroom was often out of control. She sometimes made idle threats. She yelled and was sarcastic. The principal encourages everyone to "trust the intention," but she is unhelpful when problems arise. She is often not a good listener and doesn't trust the intention of the parents. When parents approach her with a problem, she'll often make accusations or ask accusing questions.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 7, 2011

Both of my daughters have gone to this school, and I was very pleased with the teachers and the overall parent involvment. I would recommend this school to others.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 16, 2010

Lots of parent involvment, good teachers for the most part. Overall, a solid school to attend.


Posted November 27, 2010

I agree entirely with the other three star reviews: too much parental involvement (required), too little teacher input, low self discipline, and concerns are resolved their way, if addressed at all. The hands-on, fun atmosphere is nice, but over the top, and though test scores show students are performing well now, I worry about their jr. high and high school years. I like to be supportive of my kids education, and involved in the process, but I was relieved to leave this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 15, 2010

The teachers are fantastic and dedicated. Parents are very involved and the school has a great "community" feeling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

This is a parent participation alternative school. There is so much 'extra' effort put into the multi faceted curriculum by teachers, parents, families and of course the students, it deserves to be a favorite school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 5, 2009

Love the way everyone looks out for everyone's kids and how everyone is so involved!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2009

Best choice I made was to send my 2 children to Washington Open. The hands on experiances give so much more meaning to what they are learning. The places they go on field trips are wonderful, enriching the learning process so much more. Every teacher is terrific. Yes, it takes volunteer time but hasn't been as hard as you might think and I am a working parent. My children are getting a whole community of support. Great life lessons. Learning made enjoyable so children love school and want to learn.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 21, 2009

As a Washington Open parent of 6 years, I agree that this school is not for all families. If you expect a traditional setting where 'discipline' looks like children quietly working at the their desks, this is not a good place for you. If you believe in whole child education, view the learning process as an ongoing one that will hit benchmarks at different times for different children due to variations in development, and are willing to put yourself into the school community and not just look for a place to ship your child off to every day, this place is miraculous. Great teachers, huge range of activities made possible by the parent association, and a focus on life learning and not just book learning. So perhaps API scores are under 900, but Washington Open kids tend to excel as they move forward, as they know how to work together.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2008

I would disagree that there are no formal programs to teach fundamental academics. Each child is accepted at whatever level they are and supported to excel. While the activities at this school do 'appear' different than a traditional school (lots of centers, movement, activity, noise), there is a lot of learning that is taking place. More importantly, the kind of learning that is happening includes taking responsibility, making appropriate choices, and resolving conflicts, as well as traditional academics. Kids leave this school with a solid sense of who they are and how they learn. Each child is regarded as an individual with social, emotional, and academic needs. Students are active participants in their own learning, not bystanders. They take part in student-teacher-parent conferences to set personal goals for themselves. They are motived to learn for the sake of learning, not to get a reward or good grade.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

879

Change from
2012 to 2013

-11

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

879

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-11

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
46%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

57 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
55%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
72%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

56 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students42%
Females32%
Males49%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)32%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged43%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only35%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate39%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate48%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students63%
Females41%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged63%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learner73%
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate61%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate69%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Females72%
Males75%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate71%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate74%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students91%
Females92%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability93%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate94%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students90%
Females92%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females92%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate84%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students83%
Females78%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged87%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability81%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate86%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students72%
Females75%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability77%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduate60%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students86%
Females78%
Males96%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 53%
Asian 18%
Hispanic 13%
Two or more races 10%
Black 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 8%N/AN/A
English language learners 15%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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270 Washington Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95050
Website: Click here
Phone: (408) 423-3900

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