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GreatSchools Rating

John Muir Elementary School

Public | K-5

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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28 reviews of this school


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Posted June 10, 2014

We absolutely love John Muir! It is a small school with a lovely campus and GREAT teachers. There is definitely a good amount of parent involvement. Most importantly, my kids are enjoying learning and making good friendships along the way. So happy to be part of this quaint neighborhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 16, 2014

This school has a problem. There is one teacher who terrorizes students on a daily basis. You can hear this teacher scream at the students for basic things like talking out of turn or forgetting a pencil. This teacher will drone on about subjects completely unrelated to schoolwork. The actual work assigned is boring and tedious. Incoming parents should take note: 1. This school has one of the lowest test scores in SMMUSD and more troublesome declining test scores. 2. Principal needs to be replaced. She has no rapport with teachers or staff so is basically useless. She does not stand up to this teacher or enforce the zero bullying policy among students. 3. Most of the teachers are ok but there are a few bad apples like this one who intimidates children and a few others who are indifferent. For these reasons, many good families have left for nearby schools in recent years. One positive note: there is a WONDERFUL teacher there who does not get enough credit. This teacher teaches respect to our children, teaches outside of the box and most importantly inspires and gets kids excited to learn. For elementary school this is the type of teacher I wanted for my child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2014

My child is in Mr. Wheeler's class. He is an amazing teacher and an amazing role model for all of these children! I also love the community! The parents are very supportive and kind. Although our test scores may be lower than some schools, my child scored Advanced in Math and ELA last year. I think it shows how diverse our school is, and I think that there is much more to learn from diversity than the school's overall test scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2014

John Muir is mediocre at best. In my opinion, the most unorganized school in Santa Monica. The school boasts about "community", but fails to enrich the children in basic fundamentals. The teachers are nice, but with the student to teacher ratio so high, have a difficult time actually teaching (which I thought is what they are there to do). There is a small group of parents there that really try to better the school but unfortunately their efforts are done in vain. The school really has great potential, but it needs a lot of help. To make it a great school, more parent participation is needed along with stronger leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2013

I got my child out of this school just in time. Going from scoring basic on standardized testing to almost advanced in both areas. This school def. needs an overhaul. They need to start with the principal who does nothing to help the parents or kids. Most teachers are nice but several are not teaching the standards. It's really sad. Don't cheat your child. Go elsewhere.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 20, 2013

Both my daughters attend this school and we love it. Yes, the test scores aren't the highest, but we also have a very high percentage of English language learners, lower income children and special needs students (who must take the tests too). My daughters score very high on the standardized test each year. However, what's more important is that they are getting the kind of education they need, including extra assignments to keep them interested. The teachers here manage to work with a class that has a huge range of abilities and knowledge.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 7, 2012

This school has made the cut! Im not sure if some parents are educated about what makes the grade but just in case you are not educated...800 is making it. Therefore, John Muir is above that...thank you very much! My daughter has scored advanced in the STAR testing every year. By the way...we are Hispanic...just in case you thought otherwise.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2012

This school has a 5 out of 10 rating due to test scores. Does that not tell you anything? They aren't even close to making the goals set. Look at the other nearby elementary schools who are making the grade!!! This school doesn't. Heed my warning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2012

I find this school to be absolutely wonderful. My daughter is going into forth grade this year and we are hoping she gets her last years teacher. I have found that every teacher she has had has been wonderful. John Muir is wonderful and I can't believe that some parents have problems with this school. I think for the most part this school is very good when you have issues and the staff are all wonderful people. If you want a great school go to John Muir.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 2, 2012

We have had children at John Muir for 4 years. We love it! It is everything that we would want an elementary school to be! Our children have had outstanding teachers and have been challenged in the classroom. We really like the principal, who is very involved in the school. One of the best things about John Muir is the community. The community of John Muir is a very diverse group of families who come together beautifully to work together to support each other, the students, and the school. This is a small school with only 2 classrooms per grade. It is more like a private school. I highly recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2012

This school is a disaster. The campus is lovely & the principal is very nice, along with the office staff, but my daughter isn't learning at all (grade 3). She has no homework, ever. Says they aren't really doing anything for science besides studying the life cycle of corn, math is not pushed, sentence structure isn't being worked on. We recently went to the open house to watch the kids read poetry they had written and after about the 4th or 5th kids read their poems, the rest of the kids were running around, talking and just being rude. The teacher did nothing to stop it. It was horrifying to watch these kids struggle to speak in front of a group to have the group act like animals. We moved here mid year from a different school & I genuinely regret it. I am so concerned about her falling behind & not being ready for next year, that I just purchased an entire science course from an online school for her to do at home. Hopefully, she will NOT being coming back. This school is a perfect example of what is wrong with our educational programs. The teachers can't even spell. Other parents have reported similar things - oh and their after care program is also pitiful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2011

We love John Muir Elementary. It is just the right size and has a great community in a great neighborhood.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 19, 2009

I love John Muir at first I was worried that since it was public my daughter wouldn't get the same educational oppurtunites or saftey. But it's great there's a wonderful communication between parents and teacher's The new Principal is very nice, she understands the needs of children and parent's. I had concidered going to SMASH which is another wonderful school (both connected) but I can't find one single reason to do so. My daughter's kindergarten / 1st grade class learns so much. (Ms. Herman ) her teacher knows what she's doing and does it quite well. She also encourages parent participation in the learning and development.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 3, 2008

I have been a proud parent of the John Muir community for three years. Each year brings an increase in pride and confidence in the school as I have witnessed the growth of the students, the commitment of the teachers and the improvements to the administration. There is a new principal this year who is proving to be a phenomenal addition to the school. Her leadership, dedication, attention to pertinent issues and consistent follow through could very well propel this school to its fullest potential. Parent involvement is embraced and is greatly increasing every year which makes a huge difference not only in terms of the strength of our community, but for the implementation of programs such as art, science, music and computer lab through the efforts of our PTA. I would recommend this neighborhood school to other families without hesitation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 25, 2008

We actually had a choice of schools in Santa Monica and opted for John Muir after learning about the wonderful programs (including art, music, computer and science) as well as realizing the rich experience given the diverse population. Parent input and children's individuality are highly valued and the sense of community is strong. Our son has had a great 2 years there and our daughter can't wait to start kindergarten there next fall. We highly recommend this gem of an elementary school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2008

In my opinion, John Muir is a great school! This year, my son has a great teacher (Ms. Vallejo). She has a consistent system of rewards for her students as a part of her great classroom management skills, and she adjusts her teaching style and academic materials to the students needs (i.e., based on progress that she evaluates throughout the school year). Her lessons appear meaningful and fun, based on my son s reports. I feel that, as a result, my son was able to develop a positive attitude about his school and learning in general. In terms of buildings and grounds, John Muir Elementary School is a colorful, pleasant and well maintained environment for kids. The principal is open minded and cares about the community. She participates in all school related functions and is an integral part of our school community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 1, 2007

I feel good about John Muir. It's a small school which is wonderful. I love that we know so many of the families. The parent involvement is great. The kids have a good time and I appreciate the freedom they have in the yard. The teachers we've had so far have been excellent. Nurturing, but with enough discipline to keep things together. It's a charming school with diversity, a small town feel, caring teachers and principal. The kids seem to feel comfortable and supported. I'm really thrilled so far!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2007

Both of my children have attended John Muir School. If you have a child that is in need of special education services, this is not the best venue. I found the principal to be very ineffective in leadership. However, there is a lot of parent involvement and a handful of the teachers in general education are outstanding. Safety is also another area where this school needs a lot of improvement due to the lack of disciplinary actions that are taken against students who bully other children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2006

My son attended Muir from Kindergarten through fifth grade. We loved every year there. The campus always felt very safe; the teachers were caring and experienced. The classrooms were large and clean. There were sufficient numbers of Apple computers for all students to use. We has some memorable tecahers, including Sue Beltran, Daniel Wheeler and Luis Brizuela.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 6, 2006

Well, they try - but my experience with this school has been awful! The school is very disorganized and unfortunately my son got the worst teacher! She is extremely disorganized and seems to focus on the child's weaknesses in a very bad way! Overall a bad choice!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

815

Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

6 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

815

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-8

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

6 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

3 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
52%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
62%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
72%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

42 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
64%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students59%
Females69%
Males46%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability56%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females88%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students39%
Females41%
Males37%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino18%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantaged20%
Not economically disadvantaged54%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability44%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only43%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate64%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students54%
Females50%
Males60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino39%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged38%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only55%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate71%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students67%
Females72%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino59%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only72%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students78%
Females80%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantaged68%
Not economically disadvantaged90%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability85%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)64%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Females71%
Males70%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino40%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduate90%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students42%
Females38%
Males45%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino18%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged11%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability43%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only44%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)29%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students73%
Females67%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino57%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantaged56%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability73%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only73%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)69%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 42%
Hispanic 39%
Black 9%
Two or more races 6%
Asian 4%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 49%N/AN/A
English language learners 15%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Tristan Komlos
Fax number
  • (310) 452-4351

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2526 Sixth Street
Santa Monica, CA 90405
Website: Click here
Phone: (310) 399-7721

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