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GreatSchools Rating

Santa Rosa Charter School For The Arts

Charter | K-8

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 7 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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16 reviews of this school


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Posted July 16, 2014

Great lower grades, but many of the teachers in the upper grades are harsh, and play favorites. Generally the school lacks leadership
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 28, 2014

We took our daughter out of this school mid eighth grade. After numerous attempts to join forces with her educators regarding special needs that she has due to a learning disability, we finally just gave up. Although the teachers seemed interested and willing to make accommodations, the principal fought us tooth and nail for simple accommodation requests, even denying that our daughter had a learning disability and insisting that we get proof and a written diagnosis from her physician of her learning disability. Our physician was taken aback because it is the school's responsibility to test, diagnose, and accommodate the educational needs of their students.Th principal actually lied to us an told us that our daughter's IEP had been previously "Closed". Unbelievable. She has no business in education. We even reached out to the Superintendent of Santa Rosa City Schools. The Superintendent nor her secretary responded to our calls or emails. SO disappointed in the Santa Rosa City School system. Our daughter is now being home schooled at great financial cost to us and Santa Rosa City Schools has lost a student as well as the funds for the student. It is a shame for all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2013

This is a great school K thru 3rd, after that class size goes up and teacher quality goes down. We have been at the school since it's inception. The first principal helped found the school and had a clear passion for the concept and the road ahead. The current administration not so much. After a promising start I would say the school is sliding back into being a regular public school. I would definitely recommend it for the early grades after that you need to look else where.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2013

My son currently goes to this school and I have to say so far I have found the teachers outstanding. His teacher this year is incredibly inspiring and has challenged & encouraged him this entire year. He's a 2nd grader and I have heard all the rumors about the upper grade teachers (in particular the 7th grade teacher). I really do hope that situation is taken care of before my son gets to 7th grade. There was a change in principals 2 years ago & I have to say this is my major complaint about the school. She glosses over major issues like bullying, which quite frankly is becoming a huge problem (not being addressed), her rules appear arbitrary at times and she doesn't interact well with the kids. This school has the potential to be one of the best in Santa Rosa if there was a change in the upper grade staff and a new principal (or this one showed more of an interest in her school/students).
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 16, 2012

The arts curriculum weaved into the standards curriculum is wonderful. The school is high achieving, and the kids benefit from the amazing Arts focused curriculum. The parent community is a strong, supportive one. The school has a nice family feeling. Teachers vary in their skills and abilities - some are excellent, some have limitations. The principal comes from a high school setting and is overly punitive...These are young kids! Most things which earn kids suspensions are not done maliciously, but kids (disabled and not) are treated like they are 'bad apples' that need culling from the rest of the herd. The suspensions are relatively meaningless to young kids, and despite some moves to use Restorative Justice techniques for responding to student infractions, the principal remains a martinet, who fails to understand her role as a teacher, guide, and mentor for young children. School shouldn't only address the 3 R's, but also develop the WHOLE child. Punitive discipline measures benefit no one at this school, which was created in part in an attempt to address whole-child development!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2012

We have been quite impressed by the quality of the education at SRCSA using arts-integration techniques that the children seem to find interesting and challenging. Our child is enthusiastic about going to school, has found peers and friends, and fits in. All of the standard education topics are covered (math, science, language arts) and the curriculum is provided with a lot of focus on learning through art. We are pleased she can read, write, and compute, but are most interested in the cool arty stuff they learn during the school day. It is fun to have your child arrive home excited about school and ready to share a new visual art technique, dance, or song. While no school is perfect, we feel that the majority of the teachers are professional, motivated, and supportive of the students, and some are very talented in their artistic discipline. We looked at a lot of schools before selecting SRCSA in 2010 and think it is a great fit for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 21, 2012

I think "School for the Arts" is a stretch. This school has very standard public school curriculum with a couple of art type projects mixed in. It does offer band and digital arts, as well as some dance, but none of it is very impressive or run by artists. The teachers are mixed, some nice, some less so, as you would find in a public school. There is also a detention system and our teacher gave out nine detentions in about five minutes for children getting up while she left them alone to get something from another classroom. The principal told me that often people get the misconception that the school is going to be less traditional than it is when I addressed concerns over a few things. It is a mainstream program that I wouldn't recommend going out of your way to get into, but if you live close by and looking for a public school feel it will probably be fine. If you are looking for a progressive school it probably isn't what you are looking for. Also something to consider. This is a K-8 school, so younger kids are exposed to junior high school kids and everything that comes with that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2012

This school has bully teachers that don't care, a weak principal, no student leadership program, no language program, and a poor academic program that will leave your child unprepared for High School. The 4th, 5th and 6th grade teachers in 2012 are bulllies to the children and avasive to parents. It has cost hundreds in counseling and they continue to bully despite my plea to stop. Yesterday the 6th grade teacher saw my child using a sharpie from her desk to write her name on her favorite water bottle she got from summer camp. The teacher walked over to my child, ripped the pen from my childs hands and rudely said through her teeth "Next time buy your own pen!" I kid you not, this has been going on daily and I'm seeking help to prosecute these documented instances. If you go to this school; keep a running ledger on these types of instances, don't just brush it off as if the child is exaggerating, and do try to speak to the teachers, principals and community members about the instances. I'm sure we will realize that it's worse then we could imagine.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 20, 2012

Great arts program. Lots of after school electives that support the arts mission. Current eighth grade teacher is very unprofessional. Principal seems unwilling to respond to parent complaints about his behavior.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2012

Sad to hear about the eighth grade teacher problem, I suspected as much from observation, but didn't realize I wan't alone,(I do not have an eighth grader). The situation with the Boys and Girls club left me without childcare too, the one day a week I need it. It is frustrating and I have to say, the current principal does not seem to care one way or the other about parents concerns.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 30, 2012

Great early grades, don't know about others. Daycare has changed to the Boys and Girls Club and they only allow 5 days a week (nothing less). We are very upset because the program had to change in the middle of the year (!) leaving many parents in a bind. The administration acts as if they are helpless to address parents' concerns. Makes it untenable for the working parent who isn't well off. It's the same with the 8th grade teacher who should have been fired but just remains after endless parent complaints.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 13, 2011

I have to agree with the parent if you don't fit the mold its hard to get support from staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2010

We transferred in from a school in the district known as a 'great school', but treated my child poorly because he didn't fit into their mold. I am so happy we were able to get into this school as my child has blossomed in the 6 months he has been there. By incorporating art, music and creativity into the curriculum he is never bored and feels happy and relaxed instead of constantly worried. He has learned more in the past 6 months than he did in the past 1.5 years at the old school even though academically they are doing the same things. I recommend this school to every parent who asks.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2010

If your child dosn't fit into their cookie cutter mold than its really hard to get the help and understanding from staff. Some of the teachers are amazing and great, but a couple are truly terriable and have no skills in reinforcing in a postitive manner.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 4, 2009

We made a change from a feeder district school, and couldn't be happier, both with the wonderful arts curriculum embedded within the standard curriculum, or with the district itself and the services offered. My child has special needs, and I've found the administrators, teachers and specialists extremely accommodating, and willing to work with us. Finally, we feel we've found a school that feels like home. Thank you SRCSA for being there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2009

My son has only been here a couple of months and he is in the 8th grade so we won't be here long. But this school is a K-8 campus which is quite unique to public school. I love that he is not with swarms of other 7th and 8th graders. which to me feels unnatural. The teachers are great, I can e-mail his core teacher anytime and always get a quick and appropriate response. I feel like the kids and teachers really get to know each other which is rare in this age group. There is definitely more of the arts than your usual school. And it is set up to lead into the excellent art quest program at Santa Rosa High (read excellent parent and student reviews) I feel my son is challenged and valued a great combination.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

853

Change from
2012 to 2013

+2

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

853

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+2

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

4 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
58%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

65 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
61%

2011

 
 
56%

2010

 
 
65%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
71%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

40 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
74%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
70%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
48%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

30 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
34%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
57%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

24 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
59%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
62%
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
32%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

29 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
46%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students49%
Females51%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino35%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability52%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only55%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)57%
Parent education - college graduate44%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate60%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students60%
Females60%
Males61%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino35%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability63%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)52%
Parent education - college graduate75%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate67%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females86%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females93%
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females75%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged74%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students71%
Females74%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged77%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Females67%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability70%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females71%
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged73%
Not economically disadvantaged75%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate82%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students77%
Females74%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino62%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females92%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged80%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only90%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students60%
Females62%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantaged53%
Not economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability62%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only60%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students74%
Femalesn/a
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged70%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students67%
Femalesn/a
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students69%
Females75%
Males62%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only71%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students68%
Females65%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability75%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)75%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students32%
Females24%
Males43%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)29%
Economically disadvantaged17%
Not economically disadvantaged42%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability36%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only33%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)33%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students65%
Females75%
Males54%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability68%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only68%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)73%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 65%
Hispanic 25%
Two or more races 6%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1%
Asian 1%
Black 1%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 31%N/AN/A
English language learners 8%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 14%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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756 Humboldt Street
Santa Rosa, CA 95404
Website: Click here
Phone: (707) 522-3170

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