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GreatSchools Rating

Carlton Hills Elementary School

Public | K-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

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Parent involvement

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21 reviews of this school


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Posted January 20, 2014

I love Carlton Hills. I am a current student there and all of the teachers are nice and helpful there. My sister and I have only been there for 2 years and it has been awesome. There are some arguments here and there, but nothing major. However, each year, they are losing some jr high classrooms and adding more primary and intermediate classrooms. I love Mrs. Ducharme, she is the best jr high teacher ever. My sibling has Mrs. Tomaszyk and she is fun as well.


Posted October 5, 2013

Great School! The staff is friendly and helpful.The teachers are friendly an willing to help. And the students are well behaved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2012

My son started at Carlton Hills for kindergarten last year, and is doing great. Many of the reviews that are negative are from parents whose children are doing poorly in school. As a parent, if my child were struggling in a course, I would pay for tutors in that subject. Many parents assume that their responsibility lies only within making sure they are at school. The truth is that parents need to be just as active in their children's education if they want them to succeed. Yes, tutors may cost money, but when you have kids, you know they are going to cost money, and as a parent if you are not going to give them ALL the tools necessary to be successful, you are doing a disservice to your kids. Schools provide the foundation for education, parents must supplement that on their own for children to truly gain the most out of their education. Several observations: the parents that maintain constant communication with teachers have more successful children, the parents that are involved in classroom and school activities have more successful children, parents that give their children the tools to be successful will have the most successful children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2012

My daughter will be going to high school next year so I had to write and say we have always loved Carlton Hills, We have heard about bullies at other schools close to us and we are very happy that our daughter has never had to deal with anything like that. I fully recommend Carlton Hills.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2011

This school is the best school I have ever encountered! I came to California in the 2nd grade and attended a San Diego Unified School District school. I have seen the big difference in this school district compared wtih SDUSD, this district is the best. This school, which my children attend (the older one now in high school) has the most amazing teachers. If it wasn't for the dedication to the kids demonstrated daily by the principal, vice principal, teachers and resourse specialists, my autistic child would not be earning a 3.33 gpa in high school, with no modifications. The staff here really care about the kids, and it shows in the excitement both of my children exhibit about going to school. My kids are devastated if they can't go to school...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2011

I don't know what the other student is talking about with Mrs. Bertrand. She was the most amazing teacher. She teaches with humor and makes learning so much fun. I can still sing the Preamble! Even though there have been so many budget cuts, she still stays late after school for any student who needs it. She also spends her time and money to be in charge of ASB. She went to many of our sporting events at West Hills after we graduated from Carlton Hills and she always made us feel special. Maybe the other student wasn't doing his/her work, because Mrs. Bertrand does have high expectations because she knows we can do it and she doesn't accept excuses. I have had many teachers in my junior high, high school, and college years and I can honestly say that Mrs. Bertrand was my favorite teacher of all time. She is one of the reasons Carlton Hills is such an amazing school!


Posted January 12, 2011

I am a student that has moved on into highschool now and i have to agree with the upset parents. I struggled alot in Jr. High not only because i was having family problems but also because I have a learning disabilty I personaly though Mrs. Bertrand was a horrible teacher and i think Mrs. Barker needs to work harder one on one with her students when they need help after school. When i first started 7th grade Mrs. Harris was my home room teacher and she was amazing she helped me one on one after school and she would stay there with me even when it was 5:30pm if I wasnt done I was very dissapointed that they let such a wonderful teacher go...DISSAPOINTING!


Posted October 6, 2010

I have a ten year old who has attended this school since kindergarden. I feel we have the best school possible for him. Every year he has had wonderful teachers. He loves to learn and has excelled in every subject (because of the wonderful teachers). I love that the school is K-8 yet is still small school. It reminds me of the private school I attended as a child where everyone gets to know each other. I have another child getting ready to start school and am excited to go through his school years with him attending Carlton Hills.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 9, 2010

It's interesting how the negative comments involve the jr high teachers. Most children at this age are experiencing a huge transition to life and can be very unmotivated. Personally involved, I know the biggest problem is with homework completion. With lack of parental supervision and lack of educational values, students can get away with no interest in their studies. When teaching 4 different classes (not just 4 different subjects) the environment is more challenging. I feel the jr. high teachers are organized and every 3 weeks a form of communication on student progress is given to parents. Within the last few years test scores have increased and are similar to "higher performing" schools if not surpassing. If the teachers were blaming students and not giving quality instruction, how could students perform so well on new concepts? Think about it! Great school and hardworking teachers under such harsh economic budget


Posted April 20, 2010

Excellent Teachers, including the best Third Grade teacher in the entire county, excellent administration, active PTA that helps the school even with infrastructure goals, handling the current budget cutbacks without impacting the core: teaching students. The students are excellent, eager, and energegetic towards their studies.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2008

ok, honestly, all of these people that say that this school is bad and the teachers there are horrible, they're really not. the teachers there are totally awesome, and as for some of the teachers calling kids lazy, it's mainly because it's true. i was there for 7th grade, and most of the jr. high [including me at times] gets very lazy with our schoolwork. so don't go dissing the teachers when really, it's probably your own kids'[s] fault[s], ok? and as for the school itself and all of the budget cuts, every single one of them is usually necessary to keep the school open. and it's not just carlton hills, either. it's also carlton oaks, rio seco, and all the other schools in the santee school district. plus, the jr. high teachers are awesome. my favorite was mr. stanley. so just think about that!
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 27, 2007

If I could do it again, my children would attend Carlton Oaks or Rio Seco. Many Jr. High teachers are dis-organized, abrupt, and rude. Take a look in their rooms. The only decent thing about this school is the office personnel. Karen runs the entire office/school, recognizes the parents & students by name, is friendly, knowledgeable, kind and caring. Carlton Hills needs to be re-evaluated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2007

Their cafeteria food needs a complete make-over. Other then that this school is great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2007

My daughter attended Sycamore Cyn thru 6th grade & then had to transition to another school. We were a bit nervous sending her to Hills at first, but I have seen very positive changes over the past 2 years after naming a new principal & having some of Sycamore's best teachers go over to join the Junior High team. She is very happy there and excelling in all categories. This is the first time in a long time that nearly the entire class from Sycamore went to Hills. Yes, we miss the strong parental involvement and small environment but the change has been good.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 13, 2006

After attending this school as a child I was excited to send my kids there now after my two sons went through 7th and 8th I will not send my daughter there. The only decent junior high teacher is Mr. Stanley the rest where disappointing. When my child struggled in a subject these teachers just did not care we would call meeting after meeting to help ours sons do better the teacher first hardly knew what student I was talking about and then only wanted to blame them as 'lazy' kids and be done with it we had our sons tutored elsewhere to make up for there lack of teaching. Please reserach this school throughly! Thank You
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 8, 2005

Great School! Very family oriented.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2005

My point of view for Carlton Hills School is not positive. My son has attended this school since kindergarden the teachers and principals were excellent educators, until The school system began cutting back on funds. As of 2003 Carlton Hills has become a mad house, there are not enough teachers to accomodate students with learning disabilities, these students are tagged by the 'teachers & staff' as 'bad' students. There is very minimal education for students with disabilities. Even though the parents assist in every way possible the student looses out of a fair education, because they are 'lazy', when in fact they have a leraning disability. The staff is worried about the policy and procedures to maintain a 'well' school, that they hinder the students from actually receiving any extra help in their studies. I will sure be very happy when my son graduates this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2005

My children have attended this school for the past 6 years and they have grown to love the teachers who have always been supportive of their academic needs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 11, 2005

We love this school! Supportive atmosphere for children growth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 20, 2004

I think it's an awesome school. So far I have absolutely loved my sons teachers, especially the one he has now in 2nd grade. I'm very sad that we have to leave her and the school. It will be hard to find a school as good. Hopefully there is one where we move.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

889

Change from
2012 to 2013

-4

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

889

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-4

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

39 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

43 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
73%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
91%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
85%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
79%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

38 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
74%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

47 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
66%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
84%
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
46%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
48%
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
74%
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

98 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
47%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
57%
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

95 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females94%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only91%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students88%
Females88%
Males87%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantaged93%
Not economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability86%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students60%
Females45%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino45%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only58%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate43%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)63%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students91%
Females91%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino92%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Not economically disadvantaged93%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate86%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females89%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantaged84%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students94%
Females95%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantaged89%
Not economically disadvantaged100%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only97%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)92%
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students73%
Females75%
Males72%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Economically disadvantaged71%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females90%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Economically disadvantaged83%
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students47%
Females50%
Males44%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)44%
Economically disadvantaged50%
Not economically disadvantaged46%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability47%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)65%
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students66%
Females55%
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino55%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Economically disadvantaged60%
Not economically disadvantaged73%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)71%
Parent education - college graduate50%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students66%
Females64%
Males67%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino25%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)76%
Parent education - college graduate77%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students89%
Females81%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino89%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged90%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability92%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students87%
Females81%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino84%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)77%
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Students49%
Females58%
Males35%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino43%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)50%
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability50%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only49%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented79%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate35%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students81%
Females89%
Males72%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino79%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged76%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only84%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate74%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students61%
Females56%
Males68%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino50%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged54%
Not economically disadvantaged66%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented93%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate43%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)68%
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students89%
Females91%
Males88%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino86%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged91%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability90%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only89%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate80%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)93%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 58%
Hispanic 24%
Two or more races 9%
Asian 2%
Black 1%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 50%N/AN/A
English language learners 9%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Music teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Music teacher(s)
Music
  • Band
  • Instrumental music lessons

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Terry Heck
Fax number
  • (619) 258-3414

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Music teacher(s)
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • School shares bus/van with other schools
School facilities
  • Computer lab
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Swimming

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Instrumental music lessons
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Volunteer in the classroom
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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9353 Pike Road
Santee, CA 92071
Phone: (619) 258-3400

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