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GreatSchools Rating

Stevenson Ranch Elementary School

Public | K-6

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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Parent involvement

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38 reviews of this school


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Posted January 13, 2014

Most of the teachers in this school are wonderful, and the parents are the type that would put their kids in private tutoring if they are not getting what they need in school, so I'm sure the test scores will stay high. However, since the new principal started in August of 2013, I have personally spoken with several families who are making other arrangements for next year because of the way this school seems to be changing for the worse. The previous principal was extremely involved and accessible. It was apparent as soon as the new year started that this new principal was not to be bothered. The front office shields her from the parents. If you want a meeting with her you'll probably have to wait a week, but good luck getting her to return a phone call; she doesn't. And if your child gets one of the few less than good teachers, your situation is truly dire. Not only does this new principal not seem to know or care what is going on in the classrooms, she seems to hold no authority over the teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2013

The good: This school is great at fundraising and receives a lot of parental support. The campus is clean and safe. Most of the teachers are good. The bad: The curriculum is ONLY focused on test scores. If your child excels in math and reading, they'll succeed at SRE. If they struggle in this area, they will be promoted into the next grade even if they are failing. God forbid a student FAILS at SRE, let's just pass them through - No child left behind doesn't work! My child's Star Testing scores are dismal. Testing in the low 300's, 3 years in a row. She receives 1's on most of her work. I have begged the school district to hold her back one year, she is obviously struggling and they continue to promote her to the next grade level. So she starts each year failing and her self esteem suffers. I have told all of her teachers that she has ADHD and is on medication and all I receive are emails telling me she has forgot ten to turn in work or didn't complete her work in class. Don't they have anyone who knows how to work with students with ADHD? SRE needs to stop obsessing about rankings/ratings and test scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2013

The school is still recovering from the previous principal. She only cared about test scores and her so called writing program which was nothing more than the characters, plot, etc... The school has become so test driven with all the curriculum specialist, when are my children allowed to be children? Also good luck getting any help from their resource specialist in room #201 she loves to play games on her computer.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 14, 2013

Regarding Stevenson Ranch Elem.: we have decided to pull our child out after 4 years and try a charter school. It's hit and miss with teachers at every grade level so far. Some really care, while some just go thru the motions. The school has become more and more like the Wild West at lunch recess. Little to no supervision has led to several injuries and many cases of bullying. The worst part is the school admin will do whatever they can to side with bad kids so they don't have to record they have problem. Obviously my family has had to deal with this and we are done.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2013

I have spoken to many parents at this school with similar issue as mine. The abundance of bullying is increasing and no longer creating a safe, healthy environment for students to go to learn. The yard duty does not get involved and help the kids in need. Very disappointing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2013

We moved to Stevenson Ranch 16 years ago, when our oldest child was 10 months old, because of the reputation of the Newhall school district. As a parent with children who've attended and continue to attend Stevenson Ranch Elementary since 2001, I've never regretted that decision. I'm impressed with the level of dedication from teachers and staff, as well as parent volunteers. I'm as equally impressed with the additional resources we are fortunate enough to have at SRE. I have a child who struggled with math concepts and another child who's challenge was reading comprehension, and SRE offers before school intervention for both subjects. So if a child needs that extra help, it is available and you need only take advantage of what is offered. This school also has an excellent GATE program that my middle child could not wait to attend every morning. I now have children in both jr. high and high school, and the education they received at SRE was a strong foundation which prepared them for their current success. The classes at Rancho Pico JH and West Ranch HS are no joke. I actually can't fathom how anyone could give this school anything other than a stellar review.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2013

GREAT School!! -- This school is for you if you want your child to excel academically. Teachers and administrative staff are very supportive and caring. My son loves going to school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 1, 2012

Great school, my son did 6th grade at the school. He home schooled every year before going to SRE. He really enjoyed going to school and making friends, he became motivated to study harder the subjects he didn't like. The teachers, staff and Principal are very involved. The Principal always returned my communication. She took diciplinary action when there was question of bullying. She took time to go into the classroom and teach certain lessons. I highly recommend the school. There is plenty of opportunity for parent to be involved. Great place to learn! !
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2011

Too much is geared toward testing; time spent evaluating what the kids DON'T know. I highly suggest spending more time teaching the material and taking the time to learn students' individual needs instead of spending so much time on testing and data entry. Also, recent disciplinary actions have caused me to question the judgment of the administration. After reading other reviews, I find I'm not the only parent who questions the judgment of the administration.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 11, 2010

This school is one of the BEST schools in the state of California. The Principal does amazing things for our kids - she addressess specific needs that students have. As for teaching to the test, SRES teaches the CA standards. The state test is on those standards. That means this school does an excellent job teaching the standards to the kids. You will not find a private school that does a better job in this valley!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2010

We are not very happy with the diversity at the school but our kids are doing really well. I do agree with the comment about the amount of time they spend on testing but in our experience our kids have had excellent teachers that have provided experiences and taught outside of the rote memorization process. Our kids have established great relationships with their teachers so far but have had some racial incidents at the school with other kids. The school 's leadership has handled these situations as best they could in a neighborhood where elements of racial discrimination still exist.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2010

Too much time spent on preparing for the STAR testing. To much pushing students to all fit the same mold. Too much homework and rote memorization going on and not enough individual thinking. High STAR test scores just mean that you have done well in making the kids memorize the answers. When they get to the high school, they are all the same from any school in the area. We moved for the school but realized after several years that to get those high test scores, the kids are being taught to take the test - not to learn, comprehend, use etc. Very disappointing. Not for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 24, 2010

My granddaughter attended there and my grandson currently attends. I am so impressed with the caliber of teachers and the content that is taught there as well as the positive impact it has on both their lives.


Posted February 28, 2010

The teachers, staff and leadership are extraordinarily committed to the school and the students. So far, our experience with leadership has been very positive -- very attentive and hands on. Teachers have been better than excellent for us.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2009

The teachers are excellent ! My kids are very happy with the school activities that they provide. THANKS
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 10, 2009

We have a 4th grader and a kindergartner in SRE. We think it is a very well run school to excellent teachers and staff. There is also excellent parental involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2009

I rarely see the principal out on the yard. Does she do any kind of supervision? I dont see her after school too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 27, 2009

I'm not sure if the principal makes decisions on what's best for kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 25, 2009

Wonderful school. Have had children enrolled here since 2000. This school was always good but has gotten better and better. Excellent teachers, very professional staff, great facilities, high academic standards, science lab, new track, physical fitness program, art program, music lessons, plays and musicals, lots of extracurricular activities, involved parents. And all of this -- in an absolutely beautiful location. Our two oldest children attended a prestigious private school on the Westside of Los Angeles. This school offers everything that that school offered--and more. We have been grateful for this school almost daily for nine years.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 20, 2009

'Drill 'em, drill 'em, drill 'em' is the school's focus. However, I don't blame the teachers, after all, it's the only 'reliable' resource the school has left for obtaining high test scores. In the past five years, I have observed the of quality parental support and involvement go down hill. Problematic student behavior (disrespect) is rampant. Accountability for such behavior does NOT exist. We no longer feel that this school provides a safe and nurturing 'learning' environment for our three children. We are going private next year. As for the high test scores, my spouse and I will be happy to drill'em at home!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

978

Change from
2012 to 2013

-3

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

978

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-3

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

10 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
90%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

120 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

142 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

128 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

140 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

141 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

140 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

159 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
92%
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

159 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students92%
Females93%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian91%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged92%
Students with disability64%
Students with no reported disability95%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate96%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students96%
Females96%
Males96%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disability73%
Students with no reported disability98%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate93%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students88%
Females91%
Males84%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino80%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged88%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability89%
English learner83%
Fluent-English proficient and English only88%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students96%
Females95%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian96%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino95%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learner92%
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate99%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students97%
Females98%
Males96%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino89%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability100%
English learner86%
Fluent-English proficient and English only98%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)91%
Parent education - college graduate100%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students94%
Females93%
Males96%
African Americann/a
Asian92%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino94%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learner92%
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented96%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate96%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students94%
Females97%
Males92%
African Americann/a
Asian86%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)82%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students98%
Females99%
Males97%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino94%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged98%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability99%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only99%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)94%
Parent education - college graduate98%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students94%
Females97%
Males90%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino88%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability94%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only94%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)88%
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate97%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students96%
Females94%
Males99%
African Americann/a
Asian100%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino93%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged97%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduate94%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate98%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students95%
Females93%
Males99%
African Americann/a
Asian97%
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino100%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Not economically disadvantaged95%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability96%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only96%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate95%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 52%
Asian 18%
Hispanic 16%
Two or more races 8%
Black 2%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 8%N/AN/A
English language learners 9%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

This school has not yet provided program information.


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25820 North Carroll Lane
Stevenson Ranch, CA 91381
Phone: (661) 291-4070

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