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GreatSchools Rating

Paloma Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 636 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 3 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 2 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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29 reviews of this school


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Posted June 5, 2014

We started halfway through the year and have had an excellent school year. My kids are sad on Fridays because they don't "get to go to school". In my many years of parenting, I have never heard that comment before. We felt welcomed and included from the get-go. The teachers we've experienced have all been superb.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 15, 2014

Paloma is a wonderful school. We moved into the district last summer and my kids feel more at home at Paloma than they did at their previous school. love the family atmosphere and the caring attitudes!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2014

In response to the teacher review below: shame on your grammar and shame on you for taking a defensive and reactive position rather promoting a proactive, problem-solving environment. You should be encouraging parents to seek solutions. As a parent who is dissatisfied with the quality of teaching and the favoritism of some parents and their children over others I can honestly say you've just put yet another nail in the coffin of Paloma Elementary. Way to set an example. Where should the shame really be pointed?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 12, 2014

I just have to respond to the last review posted in regards to Mrs. Gradstein. Mrs. Gradstein is an amazing administrator. Yes, it is her first year and she is doing an fabulous job. She welcomes all new families with giant smiles and a welcoming heart. She has quickly learned so many of our student names and recognizes each and everyone (students and staff) for any accomplishment, small or large. She has had to take on this school with many cut backs from the state and has made adjustments in order to make our school fun and successful even though so much has been taken. She has brought in many new fun and exciting programs for our children so that the impact of the cut backs are minimal if even felt at all. I have been a part of Paloma for many years. I have seen many changes. Never have I never experianced a bad one. I know first hand that the only difference in Paloma since Mrs. Gradstein has taken over our school are only positive ones. I am angry for someone to express an opionon about someone they do not even really know and are quick to judge just because of change. Shame on you. I know first hand that all the staff I am involved with are very happy with Mrs. Gradstein.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted December 11, 2013

Paloma was once a wonderful school when under Mrs. Johnson. There is a new principal, Mrs. Gradstein, as of Aug 2013. Mrs. Gradstein is also a first year ever principal. Her leadership has drastically changed the school for the worse. She doesn't make an effort to get to know the students by name or even acknowledge students who say "hi" to her. She is an authoritarian "do as I say because i am the principal" leader which creates unhappy staff, students and parents. She lacks the interest to listen to others and form collaborations which has elicited many of the long time PTA volunteers to want to step down. Staff has expressed exasperation and wanting to quit their jobs. Students have been put under undue stress by her changing many of their traditions and school rules. Mrs. Gradstein is not very welcoming to parents and has created as many roadblocks as possible. Students need to see the adults at their school demonstrate by their actions the words they are promoting. Mrs. Gradstein fails to demonstrate true care and concern for being "student-centered" because the students are not feeling that they are considered or heard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2013

I felt compelled to respond to the last reviewer. There are some things I don t think some parents understand. In our state there is zero money for the schools. Schools fundraise so that the students can have those wonderful extra programs and activities such as art programs and dances. At Paloma we have a group proactive parents who work hard to keep these programs and run the activities. It wouldn't be a small group of people doing so if more parents were involved and helped. I am new to the school and have always found everyone to be warm, friendly and welcoming. I love my Child s teacher and I think the principal really cares for the students. I think more parents need to be proactive in their children s education and if you don t like something then join the PTA and/or go to meetings. Make your voice heard. It easy to do nothing and complain. Overall, my child is very happy at Paloma and I think it is a positive learning environment with wonderful teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 16, 2013

Laser beam focus on test scores. If your student is at grade level they will get very little attention because all they care about is bringing up the lower students. Sadly the best teachers left in the most recent round of layoffs. Principal came about 4 yrs ago and one by one took away all the enriching programs and activities to focus more on testing. A lot of fundraising which happens all the time and is run by a small group of women who can be clique-y. The new "Sixth Grade Academy" is concerning because those students might be very behind when they get to middle school. The information being taught there does not seem to be at the same level of what students get at the regular middle school. Also if you have an advanced student they will not get pre-algebra in 6th grade like they will at the middle school, which sets them off to be behind by a year for math and science in high school because they will be missing pre-reqs. Overall feeling of school is very closed off and unfriendly. Staff morale seems low.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 15, 2012

This is an updated review from a previous one I made in 2011. I wanted to make another review because since the incident that took place in 2011, my daughter has done very well and she loves her new teacher and Paloma. Unfortunately, because of that incident I don't spend much time at the school- I honestly don't like running into the principal or the teacher. However, this is something I have to deal with and does not reflect the performance of the school or the majority of it's staff. I'm happy that my daughter is happy and that's all I care about.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 28, 2012

Paloma Elementary not only earned the prestigious title of "California Distinguished School" last year, but they also piloted the brand new 6th grade Academy this year. They are a school that never rests on its laurels and I appreciate the willingness to always go above and beyond. I give them an enthusiastic thumbs-up and a score of 5 stars!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2012

Love this school just worried about the over crowding. More children will make it harder for the teacher to give any one on one. So you better be ready to work with your children after school. So they don't forget what they have learned for the day. Teachers are great and staff too! If you have the time Volunteer. Also funds are low so we as parents need to buy supplies for the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2011

I'm very dissapointed with the school. We moved here this summer and our daughter is having many problems. The concerning thing is that instead of helping my daughter to adjust, they are telling me about my parenting. Where are we, Stepford?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2011

We've been in Temecula for about a year and a half. We started mid-term, and everything started out great... but my child was very unhappy after just a few weeks. I became aware very quickly of cliques even amongst the youngest children. The new principal was great at working with the kids, but the last teacher was just terrible. They don't do much for gifted kids as far as I can tell... I had to fight hard just to get my kid work hard enough to keep things interesting. So much of it was too easy, and the teacher couldn't care less about the kids as long as the shut up and followed the crowd. Some of the parents were great- but most won't even look your way if you're new. For "The Best School in the District", they're more focused on PTA numbers and fundraisers than they are on making sure the kids are happy and challenged, not teased or bullied. We will probably home-school if the next teacher is anything like we just went through this past year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 17, 2010

Paloma Elementary has the best teachers and principal who really care about the children and their education!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

Homeschool is obviously always an option for any parent; however, after homeschooling my own child I quickly realized that in no way could I even attempt to bring the same breadth to learning that Paloma does on a daily basis. I could provide the essential elements but not the extras that they provide (from computer lab to art lessons to weekly flag salutes to field trips to resources in the classroom etc...) I would recommend that you integrate yourself to the school perhaps by volunteering to bring your own 'personal wow!' to the school. Every parent has something to offer! They used to have a saying: 'If it is to be, it is up to me!' I take that to heart!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2010

After 2 years of my daughter attending Paloma (starting at K), I am not particularly impressed. Nothing terrible, it's just OK - that's all. Actually, after my experience with Paloma and the entrenched bureaucracy, I'm starting to understand why people Home School their children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2009

My student transferred midyear and every effort was made to make him welcomed.Tteachers are really happy here. My student is excited to go to school and did not want the year to end. Teachers put much effort into bringing hands-on learning. (Growing chicks, making volcanoes, making fossils) The principal just left this year and she was amazing! The atmosphere here is 'learning is fun!'. Front office is pretty friendly. The academics could be more challenging. Expectations are not very high. Since moving here... school is too easy for our student. Our previous school district had 'High Expectations;High Acheivement'. They ability group students for all Math learning which allows teachers to really make progress. Excellent! We are so happy. Teachers are free to try new things.Students behavior is very friendly/kind but a bit rough w/bad language and subjects they discuss.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2008

I feel this school is completely academically oriented, and am really surprised that anyone would think otherwise. My middle daughter is not as fast at math as the other two, and she is constantly being pushed and pulled and helped by her teacher to get her better at math. Yes, we do touch math. I was taught touch math, and while my other two never needed it, my middle daughter did, and the teachers have been great at keeping her up in math. The other two were both very good at math, and given harder work to do to keep them chalenged. This is a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2008

The atmosphere and educational environment is top notch. I'm a little shocked about the touch point math comment. Everyone learns differently and while touch math might not be best for all it is just a strategy. I still use touch math as an adult. I wonder if they teach touch math at private schools as well?


Posted January 6, 2008

I have read the other reviews and I am shocked that nobody else has expressed concern. Granted they are patriotic, however, they fall short when it comes to academics. They teach 'touch point math' which they will tell you is a teaching method and not a curriculum. We have spent many hours undoing this 'teaching method'. More than half of the students in my childs class were going to Kumon learning center for math tutoring. Don't even try to talk to the staff (especially the principal) about this, they are very defensive about it. I guess I would be to if I were continuing to use something that did not work, yet insist that it did. Very dissapointed with the arrogant attitude from the some of the staff. I cannot recomend this school. Our child will be attending a private school next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2007

Teachers really care about the students School still says pledge with 'one nation under God' and with no apologies. Alot of Christian staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

889

Change from
2012 to 2013

-31

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school did not meet all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

889

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

-31

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school's test score performance improved between Spring 2012 and Spring 2013. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

9 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

10 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
70%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

96 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
69%
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

102 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

111 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
88%
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

113 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
83%
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
83%
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

110 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

63 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students77%
Females95%
Males64%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Economically disadvantaged65%
Not economically disadvantaged81%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)70%
Parent education - college graduate86%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students74%
Females85%
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino64%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantaged59%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability76%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only76%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)60%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate92%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students63%
Females69%
Males57%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino58%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantaged57%
Not economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)47%
Parent education - college graduate78%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate70%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students73%
Females71%
Males74%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino61%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Economically disadvantaged52%
Not economically disadvantaged78%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability74%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only74%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented95%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)59%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate91%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students85%
Females87%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino83%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Economically disadvantaged70%
Not economically disadvantaged91%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability88%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only87%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented95%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate81%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)78%
Parent education - college graduate89%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students82%
Females79%
Males85%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino78%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged89%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability84%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only86%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate63%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)81%
Parent education - college graduate95%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students76%
Females81%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino66%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability80%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented92%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate82%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)87%
Parent education - college graduate74%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate63%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students83%
Females84%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino90%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantaged76%
Not economically disadvantaged85%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only82%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate82%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)72%
Parent education - college graduate88%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students77%
Females71%
Males83%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino72%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantaged80%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability79%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only78%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduate65%
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)83%
Parent education - college graduate81%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate74%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students95%
Females96%
Males94%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino91%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Economically disadvantaged92%
Not economically disadvantaged96%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability97%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only95%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)100%
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students92%
Females93%
Males91%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latino96%
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Economically disadvantaged86%
Not economically disadvantaged94%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability91%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only92%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talented100%
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)95%
Parent education - college graduate91%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school
White 57%
Hispanic 30%
Two or more races 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2%
Asian 2%
Black 2%
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 25%N/AN/A
English language learners 4%N/AN/A
Source: CA Dept. of Education, 2013-2014

Teacher experience

  This school District averageState average
First-year teachers 0%N/AN/A
Source: Civil Rights Data Collection, 2011-2012

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Kelly Gradstein
Fax number
  • (951) 302-5176

Resources

School facilities
  • Computer lab
School leaders can update this information here.

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42940 Via Rami
Temecula, CA 92592
Phone: (951) 302-5165

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