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GreatSchools Rating

Bridges Charter School

Charter | K-8

Student diversity

Looks like we have no information about the race or ethnicity of the student body.

 
 

Living in Thousand Oaks

Situated in a suburban neighborhood. The median home value is $425,000. The average monthly rent for a 2 bedroom apartment is $1,630.

Source: Sperling's Best Places
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 14 ratings
2012:
Based on 10 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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28 reviews of this school


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Posted April 19, 2014

Unfortunately Bridges is not what it advertises. Once upon a time I believe Bridges was a school that rallied around the Whole Child philosophy, but that day has come and gone, and in it's place is left a school that is leading the way in the district with Common Core Standards and implementation. Despite what some would argue, Bridges is just another cookie cuter public school pumping out little machines (albeit these machines know the importance of recycling and eating healthy foods) with meager critical thinking capabilities. The real problem however lies in the fact Bridges is caught in an identity crisis which has resulted in teachers being overwhelmed by the chaos of their unstructured classrooms full of students grappling with how to discern their expectations of work that hasn't been properly explained to them, or taught as the teachers are still trying to figure out how to be Whole Child with now worksheets and preparing for state tests. Overall, it's a mess. Their are some great teachers; the Kindergarten program is incredible, but apart from that, it's probably just best to invest your child's time in a school with a more established and cohesive educational philosophy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 17, 2014

I truly love bridges next year will be my sons last year! Love the staff but what bridges have is the most amazing teachers, my son does extra work just because... they inspired the kids to do their best.. The kids at bridges are well behave I should know had to field trip s to our ranch where the kids got the opportunity to have a hands on learning ! They try the best to get the kids involved on educations and they make it fun! My son is an A student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2014

I sent my children to BRIDGES. For 2011-2012 I LOVED it. But once 2012-2013 came. I was starting to not love it so much. I found out that the director of the school was changed. And some people were fired that started the school. One of my children were in middle school there and if you didn't like a teacher in a certain subject you couldn't change it to another one. There is literally one teacher for each. They never got lockers either, they kept pushing that back and finally they made them pretty much shelves. At the end of the year, every single person that started the school got 'let go' and I pulled out all my kids. Those were the only good people there. NOT happy. Please return to the original school you were.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2014

This school is wonderful for some kids, but not all. You have to know your child. Kids that are self-motivated and at or above grade level will probably flourish in an environment like Bridges. We tried it for two years and I saw many wonderful things that they are for sure doing right. The communication, consistency and classroom management needs improving in most classes, but the teachers are all passionate (albeit perpetually overwhelmed) and truly love what they do. We left Bridges and my kids are doing much better with more structure and clear expectations. BUT I have many friends with kids at Bridges and know they are very happy, so this is just my experience with my own individual children. :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 21, 2013

Bridges is a nurturing and healthy place for our kids to grow. I like that nutritious food and taking care of the environment are an everyday part of school life. My sons are not just learning academics--they are learning social skills, art, music, and going out in the wider community through field trips. I also appreciate that Bridges lets kids be kids. Yes, there's makeup in the upper grades, but that's the exception rather than the norm. I see 8th graders running and swinging on the playground. At Bridges multi-age relationships are encouraged, and no one gives a second look to see a first-grader playing with a third-grader, for example. Bridges is a loving community and I know other parents look out for my child as I look out for theirs on my volunteer day. The only thing I would change about this school is Friends Friday during fall--too hectic and chaotic for many of the little ones.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 29, 2013

We are so lucky to have choices in the Conejo Valley. I was tired of the large burocracy of CVUSD, watching my children becoming little machines in the classroom pumping out worksheet after work sheet without much critical thinking or deep connections being made. My children have attended BRIDGES Charter School since the school opened. Yes, there have been changes in administration and some teachers since BRIDGES first opened. Overall, our family has been very happy with our experience at BRIDGES. Both of my children are now in middle school and enjoying their experience. They like the smaller class sizes, individualized attention and community feel of the school. The teachers treat the children as individuals as they challenge them to their fullest abilities. As a parent I like seeing parents actively involved in their children s education, children learning to make good choices and taking responsibility for their education, healthy food and holidays not centered on sugary treats. If you are looking to be a partner in education with your child s school, BRIDGES is the place to be.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2013

A school with little homework! What a concept!!! There are numerous reasons why BRIDGES is a great school, but one BIG reason stands out above all. If you're a parent who is concerned about "test scores," consider this: How does a school like BRIDGES score well above the statewide average, yet manage to give minimal amounts of homework every night? Because these kids get time to play, explore, eat & sleep! Their brains are stimulated, not fried. They can retain what they learn because they do it through hands-on doing, not textbook memorizing. For the lack of homework alone, BRIDGES is a school worth sending your children to!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

Bridges tries to balance 2 distinct philosophies under one roof. The story below illustrates the contrast. (Names are fictitious.) The Smiths want their daughter Jill to be competitive in the real world. Repetition (homework), discipline, grades & academics are highly valued. Comparing test scores between schools is key to what is a "great or good" school. Jill scores high in Math & low in Reading. Her parents are "concerned" & want a more challenging curriculum & homework to address the imbalance. John is in 5th grade. Creative, intelligent, & very passionate about literature. He will write or read for hours on his own. Their perfect school, would amplify what's there & have a place to grow socially. Developing listening skills , empathy, compassion, & verbal language to maturely resolve conflict are most important. The Smiths want a teacher fired for wasting instruction time talking about conflict resolution & low test scores. The Jones' want a teacher fired for burying kids with homework & busy work & not addressing emotional growth. Great Schools is the "Amazon Star Rating System" for parents, like buying tires. There are immeasurable things in life that matter.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2013

This is our second year at Bridges. Last year I had a 6th and 8th grader; this year I have a Kindergartner and 7th grader. There were some bumps in the road with communication, coordinating parent involvement and the junior high program last year. This year has been a 180 degree turn around! The communication is clear, concise and comes in a variety of ways. The school and PAC are working to coordinate parent involvement so that each teacher, grade level and activity is being supported. The junior high program has stepped up! the teachers are working as a team to bring the level of expectation up, up, up. The specialist the school has hired are incredible: art, music, spanish, p.e.; we even have a stem and robotics program! The work the board and staff put in over the summer is paying off in a big way this year. BUT if you are looking for a school to drop off your kid and step away, this school is NOt for you! Parent involvement is a HUGE part of the program at all grade levels.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2013

My Daughter goes to Bridges because she loves it. I love this school as a parent too.I love to volunteer in the class,the fact that I get to interact with the kids in class and know the parents is awesome. The school has grown so much in the last few years and is getting better every year. My daughter goes to 1st grade and actually wants to go to school everyday.The school every year is moving in the right direction and getting better and better.Love BRIDGES.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2013

We have had a fantastic experience at Bridges. Great Leadership, Teachers, and remarkable contributions from parents . Make the time to check this school out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2013

BRIDGES Is a great school. It's all in how you look at it. While some think the firing of teachers is bad, others see it as a benefit of a Charter (no tenure). Some say the school goes through too many changes; others see it as progress. Some see students as unruly and disobedient; others see it as children being allowed a freedom of expression. No school is perfect. Parent expect schools to be the sole education for their children! BRIDGES truly involves the parent to be part of their children's education. Some think it's asking too much from a parent; others think it's an incredible partnership. It's all how you look at it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2013

my kids were getting bullied at BRIDGES. I talked to the Director, Staff and teachers. It was not handled properly. Last year the last of the people who started the school were fired. Since then, the whole school fell apart. I took my child out of BRIDGES because of this. After 3 years of being there, we noticed that this was no longer a real Charter school. Don't send your kids here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2013

If you want wild, disrespectful, un-educated children send them to Bridges. Kinder program is wonderful, but the school has turned into dumping ground for kids who can't handle regular school. The school is a joke.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2013

A wonderful school where the teachers teach for the whole child. Bridges has a hybrid homeschool program where child can be at school half the week and at home half the week. A very nice library, and lots of events and fun things to do for the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 23, 2013

My kids have been at Bridges since it opened and we love it! The teachers are great and the new director is awesome. They are going into 2nd and 4th grade and can't wait for school to start again. The project-based approach is much better than just teaching a child how to take a standardized test. Real world applications of learning and problem solving will help my children later on in life. Their reading has improved dramatically, math is over their grade level and they were involved in science and social studies projects that were so interesting,they really retained the information they learned. They are expected to write everyday - creatively as well as essay-style - which will help them enormously in the upper grades. I feel like they are in a "village". The other parents really care about my children and I care about theirs. Far different from the traditional neighnborhood school we came from.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 18, 2013

B.R.I.D.G.E.S Charter school is NOT what it advertises. At one time I had 3 children attending Bridges and slowly I have taken them all out as the good teachers have been fired replaced by teachers that follow the poor current leadership. unresponsive to concerns and emails, fail to follow their own policies and philosophies, all in all it is such a shame to see what could have been a great school fall so far down hill. Do NOT send your children here, the current staff and directors need changing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2013

I went to B.R.I.D.G.E.S. You should not. The middle school section doesn't even have lockers and there is only one teacher per section. The Director of this school is terrible and all the good teachers are getting fired. I left the school. All bad situations were never delt with. Don't waste your time here. Even my parents thought this school was bad.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 28, 2012

I've transfer both my sons to Bridges this year. One is 4th. grade and the second 1st. grade. It wasn't an easy decision, my 4th grader was not happy to leave his friends, but I thought I had to do what I think it's good for him. It has been nothing but great, since the first day of school!!! Both of my boys are happy to go to school, learned so much thru all kind of hands on activities. I listen to the conversions they have in car about stuff they did in school and my heart explode of happiness!! They care about each other so much more now. They teach them at school, other then academics, about respect...yourself, your community and I can see how they changed. My first grader already had 3 field trips, which all were related to things they learned in class. The communications with the teachers is nothing I've never experienced, and I have a 7th. grader as well..they cares about the kids more then every thing else. The new principal is on top of every thing. He cares about the parents concerns and always willing and open to hear us. You see him at all school activities, in the classrooms, art, on the yard and in the morning at the drop off. I'm so glad I've made that decision!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 8, 2012

Bridges Charter School is THE BEST school in the Conejo Valley. My son is in the Middle School program where he takes Science, Math, Humanities, PE and rotating electives. He is thriving, he is motivated, he is happy and most importantly, he is learning. The CVUSD school district could learn a thing or 20 from this school. I pulled mine from CVUSD after several disappointing, frustrating years. My son learns through all sorts of ways now, hands on, interactively, lectures and books, and more. Even his Star Testing scores have gone up significantly! Take your kids here ... they will be looked at as individuals and not a number. They will be treated with respect and they will thrive.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.

The API reflects year-over-year schools performance based on STAR test score results from spring 2013.

This school's
API score

849

Change from
2012 to 2013

+5

API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10


API Growth scores over time

Did this school meet the API goal this year?
The state goal for API is 800. All schools that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met the state goal of 800.

API Growth scores by subgroup

In addition to schoolwide API scores, each student subgroup receives an API score.
Did this school meet all the API goals for student subgroups this year?
The state goal for the API is 800. All the student subgroups at a school that are below 800 are assigned an API improvement target each year.
  • This school met all student subgroup API targets for 2013

This school's
API score

849

What is the API?
The Academic Performance Index (API) is a single number assigned to each school by the California Department of Education to measure overall school performance and improvement over time on statewide testing. The API ranges from 200 and 1000, with 800 as the state goal for all schools.
Change from
2012 to 2013

+5

Change from 2012 to 2013
Comparing the API Growth to the Base shows whether or not this school’s test score performance improved between Spring 2011 and Spring 2012. The API ranges between 200 and 1000, with 800 as the statewide goal for all schools. Schools scoring below an 800 are given at least a 5 point target for the next year.
API Statewide Rank
(2012)

7 / 10

API Statewide Rank (2012)
The API Statewide Rank ranges from 1 to 10. A rank of 10, for example, means that the school’s API fell into the top 10% of all schools in the state with a comparable grade range. The 2012 rank is based on results from tests students took in Spring 2012.
API Similar Schools Rank (2012)

1 / 10

API Similar Schools Rank (2012)
The API Similar Schools Rank ranges from 1 to 10. It shows how the school compares to other schools with similar student demographic profiles. The California Department of Education uses parent education level, poverty level, student ethnicity and other data to identify similar schools.
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 56% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

41 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
62%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 46% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 66% in 2013.

44 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
42%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 65% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
70%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
54%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

35 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 57% in 2013.

36 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

33 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 86% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 60% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
n/a
Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

The state average for Algebra I was 50% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
English Language Arts

The state average for English Language Arts was 57% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

The state average for General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards) was 31% in 2013.

19 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Geometry

The state average for Geometry was 85% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

The state average for History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative was 52% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 67% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students68%
Females75%
Males60%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged67%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only66%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate73%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students85%
Females90%
Males81%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged86%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability87%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only85%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate80%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate93%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students57%
Females60%
Males53%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged56%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability60%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only59%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate69%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate53%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students80%
Females80%
Males79%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged79%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only80%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate85%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate84%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students65%
Females58%
Males73%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged64%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability71%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only65%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate55%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students54%
Females33%
Males80%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability54%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only50%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students64%
Females79%
Males47%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)73%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability67%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate64%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students63%
Females58%
Males69%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)65%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged61%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability61%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate83%
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students64%
Females68%
Males59%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability64%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only64%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate45%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduate100%
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

English Language Arts

All Students72%
Females74%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)81%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged72%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability78%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only75%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate87%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students60%
Females53%
Males71%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged59%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability59%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduate63%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students71%
Femalesn/a
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged68%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability72%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only70%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)45%
Parent education - college graduate83%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Math

All Students61%
Femalesn/a
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged60%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability66%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only63%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)36%
Parent education - college graduate92%
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Algebra I

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

English Language Arts

All Students82%
Femalesn/a
Males82%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged83%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability83%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only81%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

General Mathematics (Grades 6 & 7 Standards)

All Students68%
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)64%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged69%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability69%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only67%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Geometry

All Studentsn/a
Femalesn/a
Malesn/a
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disabilityn/a
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English onlyn/a
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

History - Social Science Grade 8 Cumulative

All Students52%
Femalesn/a
Males65%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged52%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability48%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only54%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a

Science

All Students63%
Femalesn/a
Males76%
African Americann/a
Asiann/a
Filipinon/a
Hispanic or Latinon/a
American Indian or Alaska Nativen/a
Native Hawaiiann/a
Pacific Islandern/a
Samoann/a
Other Pacific Islandern/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Economically disadvantagedn/a
Non-economically disadvantaged65%
Students with disabilityn/a
Students with no reported disability65%
English learnern/a
Fluent-English proficient and English only62%
Migrant educationn/a
Gifted and talentedn/a
Parent education - not a high school graduaten/a
Parent education - high school graduaten/a
Parent education - some college (includes AA degree)n/a
Parent education - college graduaten/a
Parent education - graduate school/post graduaten/a
Parent education - declined to staten/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 California used the California Standards Tests (CSTs) to test students in English language arts in grades 2 through 11; math in grades 2 through 7; science in grades 5, 8 and 10; and history-social science in grades 8 and 11. Middle and high school students also took subject-specific CSTs in math and science, depending on the course in which they were enrolled. The CSTs are standards-based tests, which means they measure how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of California. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the tests.

The different student groups are identified by the California Department of Education; if there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: California Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Oops! We currently do not have any student information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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1335 Calle Bouganvilla
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
Website: Click here
Phone: (805) 492-3569

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