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GreatSchools Rating

Branson School Online

Public | K-12 | 427 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 22 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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49 reviews of this school


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Posted June 11, 2014

My children have been with Branson for over 10 years now. We've had nothing but great teachers who have been wonderful in their teaching. When one of my children started having difficulty it was picked up on by two teachers and relayed back to his homeroom teacher who immediately set up a meeting with all teachers, my son and myself to get him on the right track. We have only had two teachers (out of 24 we've had) that were not great teachers. My 6th grader did very well with the two teachers she had and my 9th and 12th graders had excellent support from teachers and counselors. Online schooling isn't for everyone and those who enroll their kids should look closely at it and not go in blindly.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2014

Branson is a wonderful school which is unlike any other online program out there. Branson's teachers create their own curriculum that is aligned with state standards. Students receive individualized attention and instruction and teachers are invested in making the experience positive for each child. It is also a great place to work and allows teachers to balance their family and personal lives with work.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 26, 2014

(What I thought I was getting? The flexibility of homeschool with the benefit of a strong curriculum.) What I got? Much less flexibility than homeschool with poor, pieced-together curricula. (What I thought I was getting? The support of excellent teachers.) What I got? One excellent teacher who knew her subjects and helped her students, and mostly awful teachers who knew less than their students and refused to be swayed by truth. (What I thought I was getting? A creative alternative to a bricks-and-mortar school.) What I got? A brick wall. (What they tell you is that just about everybody there loves it.) What they don t tell you is that there are a LOT of people who leave because they don t like it. There s a reason (um, actually many, many reasons) their rating is so low.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2014

Well, they certainly do not spend much money on curriculum for middle school students. The information they get is piecemeal, taken from various sources that are often in conflict with one another. An excellent teacher can work through that, but unfortunately my daughter does not even have a good teacher. As we near the end of the school year, I find myself realizing that my child got good grades but didn't really learn much of anything.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2014

First of all, attending an online school takes away all of the distractions of a brick-and-mortar classroom. Instruction is literally face-to-face. The special education teacher comes to our home for any needed testing. Extra classes and one-on-one assistance is given in the area(s) of struggle. It has been simple to get modifications and/or accommodations to the curriculum as needed. I researched a number of online schools before choosing this one. I've heard some of the bigger online schools don't supply the extra support some kids need, but Branson does a great job!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 30, 2013

Branson School Online is a wonderful alternative to public school. We have been with them for six years and find it to be great for our family. The good: elementary has a very set structure so it is easy to follow. the teachers (with a few exceptions) are pushing your kids to succeed, The gifted and talented programs is phenomenal, and there is the opportunity for concurrent enrollment. You will find that the teachers who care, really, really care. These teacher are what makes BSO such a great school. The Bad:As you get to junior high and high school the set structure begins to fade, and not in a good way. The kids find it hard to determine what is due during the week because there is a lack of structured checklists; and the fact that every teacher is doing their own thing. Branson would be smart to have the board set up a structure that all teachers had to follow instead of allowing different rules in each class. I was told by one teacher that this was preparing them for college, but me son is taking college coarses that are much more organized. Overall I am pleased with BSO, they have great teachers (with a few exceptions), and present great opportunities for the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2013

If you get a good teacher you're okay, and most of the teachers are good, but my teacher is not very smart.


Posted December 17, 2013

"My son is a 6th grader at Branson this year. He is thriving and is motivated because he gets to decide his schedule which is empowering. His is not into sports and since Branson allows him to plan his gym class, he loves trying different creative ways of exercising. He is very artistic and enjoys completing his work each day early so he can have more time learning and implementing art. When he attended the local school he would spend about 40 minutes on the bus ride one way every day. Instead of riding the bus for 180 minutes a day, he takes that time for art and other interests. The teachers are very patient, organized and they follow up each week with a phone call. This allows the parent to go over any concerns. What sets Branson apart from the public school is that a student will not fall through any cracks, meaning, if there is a missing assignment or your child is struggling, you will be notified right away. This is the key to success, catching it right away so there will be less confusion for your child, and if you need to get involved as a parent, you have the opportunity to do so. This is what I so appreciate about Branson, thank you 6th grade teachers!!!"


Posted November 21, 2013

My daughter attended Branson School Online (BSO) four years and graduated in May 2013. She is now happily attending a selective college in Texas, studying vocal music performance, and is doing very well as a freshman with all As and Bs. She recently commented in a phone call home that in comparison with many of the other incoming freshmen, she feels she was extremely well-prepared for college through her academic experiences at BSO. Her teachers, counselors and the administrative staff were exemplary in meeting her needs in preparing her for college. Part of her success she also attributes to the opportunities BSO afforded her, such as their concurrent enrollment program. She ended up graduating from high school with 45 credit hours from a community college and the majority of those credits were accepted by her school. She, as well as we parents, received personal attention and all problems that arose were resolved quickly and expediently. Without reservation, she and I recommend BSO as a superb alternative to bricks-and-mortar school for the mature, diligent and ambitious student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2013

I had a positive experience at this school. I am a graduate from this school (2004) and I appreciated the expanded opportunities I was able to engage in without sacrificing my education. Attending BSO encouraged me to develop independent study habits that have served me through college and career. I found value in taking ownership of my education and time. In response to the post on 11/15/13 - wow, it sounds like your family has had a frustrating year. I am a parent now with one school age child and I would heavily advise you to communicate clearly your concerns to the school's administration. You will very likely find that they are willing to work to address your concerns. In my experience, attending an online school requires a strong partnership between the school's staff and the families in order to provide a thorough and positive educational experience for the students. Communication and exploration of potential solutions to perceived issues is key. For your children's sake, please escalate your concerns to the administration and help them gain the insight they need to make your family's experience as positive as many other students', including my own. Best of luck!


Posted June 23, 2013

We have successfully had our children enrolled in Branson School Online since 2009. I could not be happier with the organization, instruction, education and educators. Our first child started as a kindergartner and two years later our second child began his kindergarten year. If you are looking for a non-traditional school opportunity, I would highly encourage you to consider Branson School Online. Parents do need to be involved and be willing to work towards your child(rens) success, but the resources and support needed for ultimate success are provided.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2013

I can't say enough good things about Branson School Online (BSO.) My son went to a highly rated public school, and by 1st grade was having severe behavior problems that weren't getting effectively dealt with. We made the decision to switch to BSO. The 1st day at BSO, my son's teacher gave him an assessment test and adjusted his curriculum appropriately. When he misbehaved and had problems in class, the teacher, counselor, principal and I all had a meeting within 24 hours of the incident to set up a plan for success. Fast forward 1.5 years later (he just finished 2nd grade) and my son is excelling in all subjects. He meets weekly with his teacher and the school counselor. His test scores are significantly higher than that of the average 2nd grader. All of this and more is because BSO has dedicated, highly educated/trained, and extremely caring teachers/staff. Everyone at BSO works to form a personal relationship with students' families, and the teachers' are tireless in their efforts to ensure each child succeeds. If you are an involved parent who wants the best possible education for your children, then you will be highly satisfied with BSO.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2013

We just finished our sixth year with BSO and we love it! I feel like it gives us the best of both worlds. The kids are able to school at home with me, yet the curriculum keeps us on track and we have the support of some really amazing teachers. We plan to continue for many years to come!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 24, 2013

My school is awesome. You work at you own pace which allows you to do other life things. Like spending time with your family, going to doctor appointments and work if need be. The teachers are amazingly smart and dedicated to all of their students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2013

We had a very positive experience at Branson School. Our grandson came to live with us and was struggling with school. With the patient guidance and support of provided by the teachers and staff of the school he excelled. It was a year that really challenged him and encouraged him to use his talents. I would highly recommend Branson to families who want a good solid education for their children in an environment that is supportive and encouraging to both the student and the parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2013

My child just finished his/her first year at BOS. We have been to so many different schools I was just happy to get my kid enrolled in any school. Well- from registration to the final tests this week, this school exceeded my expectations by miles. The teachers make the difference. They are THE most dedicated individuals I have ever met in any school. My child was not allowed to fail or give up. "that's a first" in all our school experiences. Our local brick and mortar schools are all award winning schools, they don't come close to matching Branson. Branson's curriculum is excellent. The expectations for your child are much higher than we ever anticipated. It's very tough but well worth it. I don't want to forget the office staff, technology and the counselors. All unsung hero's that keep the school running so efficiently. THANKS TO EVERYONE!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2013

i loved Branson started as a junior and in that one year graduated a year early with taking a couple summer classes that i didn't like in normal school i loved in branson and they offer a lot of really good and different classes.


Posted May 23, 2013

Branson School Online is really a wonderful well rounded program. My two sons have been in Branson for 2 1/2 years and they have both achieved so much due t the great teachers and support staff. This school has given us the opportunity to not only provide our sons with an education but also to spend quality time as a family. We have tried other online schools and Branson is the only one that has made educating my sons priority through smaller class sizes and personal interaction, as well as keeping me as the parent and learning support informed and involved.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2013

The teachers care a lot, the content is wonderful. I'm floored that the school only has a six out of ten when all the reviews give it five stars. There are always fieldtrips, and they try to spread it out all over the state so that everyone can get involved. The teachers do so much work and put in so much effort for every student. For kids who are fiercely independent and don't like brick and mortar schools, this is a great alternative. But at the same time the school finds ways to bring parents into the picture. Calls every week to check up and say something positive. As long as your child can motivate themselves even a little they will prosper immensely at this school. My daughter and I both have had a wonderful experience at this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 23, 2013

I like this school because I learn better at home with my mom. -A Branson Online Student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
81%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

2013

 
 
n/a

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

16 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
33%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
57%

2012

 
 
79%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
79%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

21 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
61%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
78%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

28 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
74%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

37 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
68%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
35%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
42%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

49 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
33%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 55% in 2013.

48 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
27%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
46%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 49% in 2013.

31 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
49%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrantn/a

Reading

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrantn/a

Writing

All Studentsn/a
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in Englishn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrantn/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students75%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English75%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant75%

Reading

All Students69%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English69%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant69%

Writing

All Students44%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English44%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant44%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students57%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities57%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English57%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant57%

Reading

All Students67%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant67%

Science

All Students38%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities38%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English38%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant38%

Writing

All Students38%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)n/a
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities38%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English38%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant38%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students72%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English72%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant72%

Reading

All Students89%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant89%

Writing

All Students75%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English75%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female56%
Male53%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch55%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities59%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English54%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant54%

Reading

All Students65%
Female72%
Male58%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English65%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant65%

Writing

All Students62%
Female78%
Male47%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)75%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English62%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students39%
Female33%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)37%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch41%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities39%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English39%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant39%

Reading

All Students81%
Female78%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English81%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant81%

Science

All Students48%
Female44%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)42%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch52%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities48%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English48%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant48%

Writing

All Students58%
Female67%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)47%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch59%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities58%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English58%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students43%
Female43%
Male43%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)41%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch43%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities46%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English44%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant43%

Reading

All Students71%
Female75%
Male65%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English71%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant71%

Writing

All Students65%
Female68%
Male60%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant65%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students32%
Female33%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)38%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch30%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities33%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English32%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant32%

Reading

All Students90%
Female100%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%

Science

All Students58%
Female67%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch59%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities60%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English58%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant58%

Writing

All Students61%
Female78%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)58%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English61%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant61%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2012-2013 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 56%
Hispanic 24% 32%
Black 5% 5%
Two or more races 4% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 1%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 16%N/A41%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

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101 Saddle Rock Dr
Branson, CO 81027
Website: Click here
Phone: (719) 946-5531

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