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GreatSchools Rating

Colorado Springs Charter Academy

Charter | K-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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35 reviews of this school


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Posted June 24, 2009

It's interesting for me to read reviews from parents who are dissatisfied with how CSCA is run, as the road map for the school is thoroughly defined in the school charter. Yes, the school is demanding--one of the core values says it's a 'no excuses' environment. No, teachers do not 'have a say' in important instruction decisions, as these decisions are set forth in the charter and administered by the Administrative staff. Once again, this is all delineated within the charter. CSCA is definitely not for everyone, but it's difficult for me to empathize with those who are shocked to find out the school is rigorous, challenging, and enforces accountability and results as these values are all clearly expressed in the core values and the school charter. Thus, all parents must do their own homework before choosing the best place of learning for their children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2009

CSCA has had its ups (the curriculum is excellent) and downs, but I'm afraid to say that it is headed in what looks to be a frightening direction. There seems to be a climate of intimidation and fear among the staff and school as a whole. Teachers have no say in important instructional decisions and parents have lately had a lot of difficulty figuring out what's really going on behind the scenes. I don't trust some of the key leaders of the school, and seriously question sending my child back next fall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2009

As you read through the reviews, you will begin to see a pattern emerging. There are the parents who's children are able to do the work without excuses, and think that CSCA is the best school in the city. And then there are the parents who's children have had some type of problem, be it behavioral, social or academic; they seem to dislike everthing about the school. I can only say that for my children the school represents an answer to my prayers. I don't know what i'd do if I had to send my children elsewhere. I believe the best way to judge for yourself is to come to CSCA and take a tour, and watch the kids in action. If your'e like me, you'll know it's something special the minute you get there.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 8, 2009

With the choices in Dist. 11 this is by far the BEST choice of school to put your child in. Core knowledge is key. Teachers are always available to help both the child and the parent. I honestly believe our daughter has excelled in this charter school then she would've in any of the local district schools. Actually I know for a fact as she was a 'victim' of Dist. 11. Now I feel as thought she is getting an education worthy of preperations for high school and college. thanks csca.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2009

We had such high expectations for our kindergartener and it's interesting to see the trend in reviews. The curriculum has been great and we have enjoyed being involved parents where ever we can. It has been nice to see so much participation encouraged in a public school. However, we do not agree with retention for non-academic, non-disciplinary reasons and have felt pressured to retain our child since October in the school year, when it is far too early to judge how much a child will grow. This really makes me question the school's motives and wonder what the requirements really are for promotion. I certainly don't believe in social promotion or social retention. It's just sad. My child will thrive somewhere else next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 19, 2009

I wasn't going to post a review for CSCA but after reading some of the newer posts, I felt it was my responsibility as a parent of a kindergartner at this school. First of all, it is my feeling that CSCA is a school where you MUST be willing to be involved. It is not like many public schools where you can just leave everything up to the school(&/or teachers). They require you volunteer so that you have the opportunity to actually see what is going on in the classroom. So, if you are parent you just wants to send your child to school & NOT be involved, this is NOT the school for you. My husband & I, chose this school because that is exactly what we wanted. We are parents and our parenting doesn't end when our child gets out of the car in the morning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2009

This school promises much, but utterly fails to deliver. I took time off from work a year ago to scout possible schools for my kindergartener-to-be and the promise was that academic standards would be vigorously pursued, that Parenting with Love and Logic would be the disciplinary system used, and communication between staff up to and including the 'head of school' and parents leaves so much to be desired as to require a novella to detail. I've only begun to voice my utter displeasure at the complete lack of professionalism and resorting to bullying rather than working with us on any given problem. We were promised communication but had a vicious game of gin-rummy played upon us in that little to no information flowed our way until the school was ready to mete out harsh suspensions and continually gave veiled threats.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2009

I agree completely with the last three reviews. If your child has the slighest difficulty in behavior or learning, no matter how minor it may seem to you, do not enroll in this school. They will not communicate with you or work with you. They are interested only in the overall academic rating of their school. Colorado Charter Academy School Board take note: The word is out about your intollerant attitude to the diversity of our children and about your false advertising concerning Love and Logic use in the classroom and about how you really gain those 'Excellent' ratings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2009

After two years at this school we had to pull out for our youngest. She was having some problems with reading & just couldn't keep up. We tutored through summer & during school and although she excelled in everything else it was recommended to us to hold her back. We moved back to the original school we started out in & they were able to give her an ILP & now she's at grade level. I heard another parent say, that CSCA is geared to children who can excel but if the child needs extra help they're seen as a liability to the school. Have to say, I agree.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 19, 2008

This school is rigid, inflexible and narrow-minded for children with an Individualized Education Plan. They do not have the staff or dedication to meet the needs of children who are motivated and intelligent but who learn differently than the mainstream. Physical education, Art and Music are not offered to all students year-round.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2008

CSCA is a fantastic school. but it's not for everyone. The academic standards are much higher than most k-7 schools that are pegged to a district. Uniforms are required. Yes, they do have a zero tolerance policy for late papers and papers without names on them. This is something that I like, however I understand why some parents wouldn't. Overall I am very pleased with the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2008

The administration is very rigid. They have adopted a zero policy pertaining to no-name papers and late papers for all. We took our children out. They brag about parent involvement but really don't want it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2007

My oldest two children have attended CSCA since the 2007 school year. We can't say anything negative about this school. They promote academics, strong leadership standards and dicipline. My children come from a homeschooling backround and are preforming several grades above average. Without compromising their social need to be with like aged children the school is able to keep them academically challenged within their small group structure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2007

This is a charter school to model charter schools after! The staff is dedicated and my children have never been doing better or been happier to attend school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2007

My two oldest children have attended CSCA since it opened 2 years ago. It is an amazing school with high academic standards, great teachers, and wonderful, imaginative students. Both my daughter and son love CSCA and the friends that they have made there. I am thrilled that they are both performing well above grade level and are taught at this level but otherwise kept in a classroom of their age group. The music, art and Spanish classes are also very well done and exciting for the students. We love CSCA.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
70%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
55%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
94%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

54 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
82%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
68%

2012

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
84%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
74%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
91%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
91%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

27 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female96%
Male90%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English92%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant92%

Reading

All Students90%
Female91%
Male90%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%

Writing

All Students60%
Female65%
Male55%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities62%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English60%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female86%
Male69%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English78%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%

Reading

All Students80%
Female89%
Male69%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English80%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant80%

Writing

All Students61%
Female82%
Male38%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities62%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English61%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant61%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female88%
Male90%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant89%

Reading

All Students85%
Female88%
Male79%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English85%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant85%

Science

All Students75%
Female76%
Male74%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English75%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant75%

Writing

All Students75%
Female82%
Male63%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English75%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students68%
Female56%
Male87%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)78%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English68%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant68%

Reading

All Students95%
Female95%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant95%

Writing

All Students78%
Female78%
Male78%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch72%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities77%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English78%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female69%
Male56%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)66%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English63%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant63%

Reading

All Students82%
Female88%
Male76%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities84%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English82%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant82%

Writing

All Students82%
Female96%
Male68%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)84%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch79%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities84%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English82%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students78%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English78%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%

Reading

All Students89%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant89%

Science

All Students74%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English74%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant74%

Writing

All Students85%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English85%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 56%
Hispanic 21% 32%
Two or more races 4% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 3%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 30%N/A41%
Male 46%N/A51%
Female 54%N/A49%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Targeted Assistance program (TAS)
School leaders can update this information here.

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2577 North Chelton Rd
Colorado Springs, CO 80909
Website: Click here
Phone: (719) 636-2722

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