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GreatSchools Rating

Denver Center For International Studies

Public | 6-12 | 695 students

We are best known for preparing students for college.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted April 11, 2014

I currently attend Denver Center for International Studies, I think the school is amazing and that they offer so much to the students based off their interests and needs. The teachers are overly supportive and care about the students very deeply. Thanks DCIS.


Posted December 27, 2013

My school is AMAZING!!!!! The teachers are so nice and I feel comfortable around even the high schoolers (being in 6th grade i was nervous about going to school with them) and the only flaw is the Study skills class (advisement) it is a joke... I am literally bored to tears learning nothing in that class but otherwise i love all my other classes like Chinese, Math, etc. I would definitely reccomend this school to ANYBODY.


Posted November 16, 2013

I don't like this school because the staff and administration don't care or listen to what the students have to say. It may get some good test scores but it doesn't compare that the teachers don't really care as much as needed to get the right education. There aren't a lot of class options and aren't very interesting. I would suggest another school.


Posted July 19, 2013

DCIS: a good school for self-motivated students. The staff, block schedule and diverse classmates offer a student countless opportunities to engage in their own growth and education. It is up to the student to seize or disregard those opportunities. My son entered DCIS HS in 2009 from a 99% white affluent suburban middle school. Strong friendships with kids from all socioeconomic, ethnic and racial backgrounds grew over the past four years. The students fiercely debated every significant issue, in & out of classes, with passion in their own opinions, but with respect for the other person. The intellectual clashes with students and staff of opposing viewpoints sharpened his mind and wits, & developed courage of conviction. DCIS has a vibrant atmosphere with interested and interesting students and staff. It is not a place for wallflowers-- or a wallflower will soon get dragged into the life of the school by other students. The non-AP math classes are weak and insufficient for anyone interested in engineering or science majors in college, but all other aspects of the school seem to have prepared my son for collegiate life and academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 15, 2013

Can only comment on the middle school (3 years experience) but DCIS has been a big disappointment. Weak principal, too many low performing teachers and a student culture that isn't intellectually oriented. Nice, non-violent kids attend DCIS but they segregate by race/ethnic group, with administration's implicit consent. Happiest families seem to be those who have students who will be first generation HS graduates or first to attend college. Kids not from that background are more likely to be bored and looking elsewhere for HS. School is average by DPS standards but very much below average for people not educated in DPS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 22, 2012

I was a student at this school, and was sent to this school with many letters of recommendation. I was never the student who ditched class or gave the teachers problem but I feel that my appearance at the time singled me out from the other students and gave the faculty a set impression about me. I at the time was currently taking medication around leaving my middle school, and had been for my entire life. I quit all my medication that summer and my body wasn't used to the immediate cease of all the medication had a huge impact on my body. During my time as a student I had trouble staying awake from the changes in my body, and although I had told this to the teachers they still treated me like a guy who would rather be in a party than at school. While sleeping in a class one day I was yelled at by a teacher who told me to go to the vice principals office, when I entered the office I had no chance to speak while he accused me of being on drugs and causing a disruption to my fellow classmates and that I would be given 2 days of in school suspension for my "behavior". during those two days I was treated like a criminal by faculty and realized I absolutely had to leave this school.


Posted March 27, 2012

My son is adopted from social services and had behavioral issues. But DCIS created a good social network for him to the point of not wanting to miss one day of school. He is pushed at home to speak a foreign language and to study. When he was doing badly the teachers communicated with me and we came up with a plan to help. Now he is getting much better grades and he will be fluent in a foreign language by the time he finishes high school. It is true that extra curriculars such as music, sports, and other activities are sparse at DCIS. But, I think the most overriding factor for my son is for him to feel part of the school and get good grades. The parents are at least required to be interested in making sure their kids get a global style education. I love the assignments they give my son. They make him think about things in the world around them. Frankly we have considered moving out of the neighborhood and my son hates the idea of not being close to the school. He has NEVER liked even going to school before DCIS. The teachers are well prepared, but it is true that they need to have more mentors and one and one tutors. I think this school for their limited resources is great!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 3, 2012

This school might be good if your 6th grader is ready for college but mine isn't, she is 12 not 18 years old. The teachers do not care if their students have missing assignments, fail a test and the principal does not hold the teachers accountable for doing anything to help. When I asked teachers what day they stay after school to help students, none of them would commit to doing so. With the exception of a few teachers, they leave right after school and my kid has never once been given a detention or told to come in after school to figure out a missing or failing assignment. Also the "Study Skills" class is a joke. There are no study skills taught and at least one day a week they go outside or to the gym to play. A kid could be getting an A in Study Skills and be failing a class. So, if your child is ready for college, a stellar student that can completely manager 7 different classes and teachers without issue, then certainly, this may be the school for your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2011

My daughter, now in 9th grade has been at DCIS for the past 3 years. She and I both love the school. The quality of education is amazing and I'm so pleased with the curriculum and the fact that all the teachers are so committed to ensuring that the students not only learn, but have a clear understanding of what is being taught. As parents we teach our children to be proactive about her learning and raise them to not just depend on OTHERS to teach them, but know how to teach themselves as well. This accompanied with what she is receiving from the school, I'm certain, will ensure her a bright future. I'm looking for her being able to travel abroad and all the opportunities that that will over. In the 19 years that I've had children in public schools, DCIS is by far the best school I've ever encountered. I LOVE IT!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2010

Awesome! My daughter started at DCIS this year and has loved it. The staff has been amazing to work with. The school offers many extra's but the greatest part is that my child is learning a second language. It is a wonderful program. The principal is friendly and easy to approach. I can't say enough positive things about DCIS!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2010

This school is amazing. You never are bored in class because everything you learn is just amazing. Haha there is so much diversity at the school. im Lovin It.
—Submitted by a student


Posted January 20, 2010

Okay now... Lets be real. DCIS is a spectacular school. The teachers are like friends, and the students (HS) are superb. Best of all the travel opportunities are abundant. On the down side there are no extracurriculars (plenty of clubs), and no sports teams (HS) also the amount of homework is huge. But if you are looking for a pre-collegiate experience with a flair of all things global CIS is 100% for you.
—Submitted by a student


Posted September 28, 2009

This is a no nonsense school with great resources, real teachers (as opposed to those who just want a job), and a healthy balance of respect for, yet firm guidance of the students. The amount of homework is reasonable yet challenging. Global awareness being imparted to the students is beyond compare with any school in Denver. My child has learned more in the first 2 months of school this year than in most of last year at a different DPS middle school. Finally, communication from the school office and the active PTSA is excellent - on a regular basis - I'm not left in a void as to what is going on.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2009

DCIS is an excellent school for the kid that self motivated and international orientated. There is a lot of free time (1 hour lunch break, 20 min office hours) to get homework done, meet with teachers, do projects, or goof off (see comment about being self motivated). Many of the teachers have been overseas and/or spend time in the Peace Corps. There are many travel opportunities both as a group and as an individual student. Down side: no art, drama, PE, music. They have plenty of afterschool clubs that allow for these activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2009

Like any school, this one has its good and bad points. There is nothing to compare with the foreign language program--nowhere else can kids choose from five languages and study one to proficiency. The teachers have amazing, community-service backgrounds & the curriculum is terrific at producing involved global citizens. 100% of students go to collegeand each year several receive prestigious scholarships. Diversity is not just a goal here; it is a way of life. The school is small, which is an advantage for most kids, though making friends is tricky because this is a magnet school where students come from all over the metro area. The school struggles, however, to offer a full slate of extracurricular activities and electives like music and art.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2009

This is a great school with opportunities that can be found in few other environments in the public or private setting. The teachers are helpful, small class size and great overall leadership. Sometimes the focus on community work and travel superceds the academic needs - but I wouldnt send my child to another school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 21, 2009

My student is now a senior, having come to DCIS in 9th grade. I am overwhelmed/joyed with the growth I've seen. Some things were hard at first: being responsible for managing time (including office hours and free periods), working in teams, rising to high academic and behavioral standards from teachers and administrators.The expectation that students would learn self-governance by experimenting with it was scary at first -- to her and me. She stumbled some but has exceeded our hopes. She's traveled to Italy, England, several Native American nations, and hosted Mongolian and Navajo students. The passages and core value reflections that underpin high school are excellent foundations.The school has supported her through over-the-top emotional upheaval, special learning needs, and much more. As she completes her high school career and sets her sights on college, I know how much DCIS made that possible. I can't recommend this school highly enough.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2009

I love the diversity at DCIS and students have wonderful opportunities for international travel to places like Mongolia, India, and Africa. I have worked at many schools, but never one so devoted to serving the local and global communities!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted July 14, 2009

I love DCIS i made such great friends there. my first day was scary but i made friend right away.i loved that i was learning a foreign language and i loved that the teachers that teach the language are from the contry so they speak it perfect. the teachers are gerat there too. there a lot of clubs people can join during and after school. the school is great academecly its a great school i learned more this year than i would of learned at my old school.
—Submitted by a student


Posted June 17, 2009

I am a student at DCIS and love it!!! The teachers are amazing! The classes are educational, and fun! And our principle is one of the kindest, most funny, sweet people I know! And my fellow class mates, they are supper cool, they have helped me with work and in return I help them, and as one of our core values says we have a very colabertive culture! Over all, this is one of the top 5 best schools that you can choose, and if you do I can almost garentie that you will love it!!!
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
81%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
82%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

126 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
68%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
77%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
64%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

112 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
36%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
74%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 55% in 2013.

114 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
28%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
74%
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
47%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 49% in 2013.

94 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
58%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students60%
Female57%
Male67%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)79%
Free lunch eligible38%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities62%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English70%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant60%

Reading

All Students85%
Female80%
Male95%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic84%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English91%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant85%

Writing

All Students69%
Female66%
Male75%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Free lunch eligible52%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English76%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female62%
Male62%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Free lunch eligible38%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English72%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant62%

Reading

All Students78%
Female82%
Male73%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic59%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English91%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%

Writing

All Students78%
Female86%
Male67%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic59%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligible60%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English86%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female63%
Male56%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Free lunch eligible45%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English66%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant61%

Reading

All Students85%
Female90%
Male76%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Free lunch eligible76%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English93%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant85%

Science

All Students61%
Female62%
Male59%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic51%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)83%
Free lunch eligible37%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English70%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant61%

Writing

All Students78%
Female83%
Male68%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Free lunch eligible63%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities78%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English88%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant78%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students36%
Female40%
Male31%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic16%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)59%
Free lunch eligible19%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch48%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities37%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English41%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant36%

Reading

All Students74%
Female83%
Male61%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic59%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)90%
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English77%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant74%

Writing

All Students62%
Female71%
Male51%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic57%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)72%
Free lunch eligible45%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English65%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant62%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students27%
Female17%
Male39%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic17%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)52%
Free lunch eligible12%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch45%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities28%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English29%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant27%

Reading

All Students70%
Female64%
Male78%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligible55%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English76%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant70%

Science

All Students42%
Female34%
Male51%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic32%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)67%
Free lunch eligible17%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch66%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities44%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English49%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant42%

Writing

All Students51%
Female53%
Male49%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic37%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligible31%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities54%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English61%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant51%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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State
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Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

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State
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ACT participation

100%

Average ACT score

21

Graduation rate

87%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

3 This rating is based on composite ACT scores from 2012-13 and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2011-12. ACT participation represents the percentage of 11th graders taking the ACT. Because the ACT is mandated in Colorado high schools, ACT participation is NOT included in the GreatSchools rating.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 46% 32%
White 33% 56%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 7% 3%
Black 7% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 3% 1%
Two or more races 3% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 42%N/A41%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

College readiness and student pathways

Colleges most students attend after graduation University of Denver
University of Colorado
Colorado State University
Read more about resources at this school
Source: Manually entered by a school official.

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
PE instructor(s)
Foreign languages spoken by school staff French
German
Italian
Japanese
Chinese (Mandarin)
Spanish
Lakota
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Computer lab
Clubs
  • Gardening

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
Clubs
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Lakota
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Lakota
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Clubs
  • Gardening

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Stephen Parce
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
Special schedule
  • Block scheduling
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (720) 423-9075

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Accelerated credit learning
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Gifted / high performing
  • Honors track
  • Independent Study
  • Standards-based
  • Virtual school
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Global
Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Lakota
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • German
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Lakota
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
  • Tutoring
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • Community college courses
  • SAT/ACT prep classes
  • Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
Transportation options
  • Buses/vans for students only
  • Passes/tokens for public transportation
  • Transportation provided for special education students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Gymnasium
  • Library
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Flag football
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Flag football
  • Golf
  • Skiing
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Community service
  • Gardening
  • Student council/government
  • Student newspaper
  • Yearbook
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

School culture

Dress Code
  • Dress code
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Monitor the playground
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Present special topics during curricular units
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Tutor
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

Planning ahead

Students typically attend these schools after graduating
University of Denver
University of Colorado
Colorado State University
College preparation / awareness offered
Community college courses
College prep programs/courses during the year
Visiting teachers or lecturers from colleges
College presentations or information sessions
SAT/ACT prep classes
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

574 West 6th Ave
Denver, CO 80204
Website: Click here
Phone: (720) 423-9000

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