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GreatSchools Rating

Denver School Of The Arts

Public | 6-12 | 1051 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 9 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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104 reviews of this school


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Posted Monday, November 24, 2014

I continue to be amazed at how highly this school is rated even with the incredible crutch of an awful culture, horrible management and mostly horrible teachers. Simply amazing. Truly this school should get about a 3. Not three starts. 3 out of 10.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 30, 2014

This is daughter's first year and she loves the school. I have been very impressed with the way the teachers not in the major areas find ways to connect with these creative students. The school is very focused on developing the students not only artistically but academically as well to prepare them. They support involvement of the parents as well which I believe is part of the success to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2014

As a theatre major at DSA I can vouch for the fact that it is an amazing school. Yes there are some cliques between majors because we spend so much time in our own major, but for the most part there is less bullying for us crazy art students who wouldn't really fit in at another school. I get to do what I love every day, and I am so thankful for that. The academic teachers are mostly pretty good and academics and test scores at this school are phenomenal. The major departments are amazing as well. In theatre we are learning college level acting techniques, which is probably why we earned a total of 13 million dollars in college scholarships last year. DSA has helped and will continue to help amazing kids go far in life.


Posted August 17, 2014

I have to say we have had a very different experience that those posted below. DSA has been a great school for my daughter and she has excelled there. She went to another middle school before transferring to DSA and DSA has fewer issues with the population than the other school. We have not had bullying experience and our class and major has been great. Academics over all are great, with a few teachers we didn't care for in middle school and the teachers do pick favorites or have a favorite class on occasion. Starting high school this year and looking forward to the next four years. This school has been nourishing and encouraging with the children able to be who they are and be accepted, in our experience. Overall, this has been a great experience and I am glad our daughter went here, rather than our local home school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 6, 2014

This school is hardly elitist. There are families from all economic levels in this school. Auditions are held blindly. The art dept heads do not know the district or zip code the auditionees are coming from when they make their selections. As far as bullying goes, I have seen a swift actions from the staff on what I would consider very mild infractions. Parents and kids were sat down in an immediate conference. Bullying in this school is so much less then at our old school in Jefferson county I am thankful every time I read my daughter's facebook page and see what her old classmates are up to. I seriously thank my lucky stars we found this school. This is a school where kids are seen as individuals in every class and don't get overlooked. In the first month of my daughters advanced math class, the teacher identified her unusual learning style and offered additional insight and suggested she get longer time for testing. I asked how he recognized her learning style and he said he spends a lot of time in the beginning really looking at each and every student and their needs. Students need to learn to be self motivated and disciplined to be successful here.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2014

This school is elitist. The kids are elitist. The teachers are elitist. The parents are elitist. Bullying is very prevalent and the administration will only marginally address if it is a boy bullying a girl, girls bullying boys and girls bullying girls are ignored. My daughter was bullied for over a year before we finally pulled her from this school. My son still goes there, but probably not for long. Finally, the teachers pick their favorites and ignore the rest. Very disappointing. Very frustrating. Stay away. Let your kids excel somewhere else and keep them out of this horrible environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2014

My two sons attend this school, in different majors and grades. We have had an overall good experience for my first son and just an ok with my second son. Most of the teachers are great and the all students are amazing in their various arts. I would love to see more kids from ethnic backgrounds represented because the lack of diversity is disturbing. If DSA could bring together more races it would be a truly special kind of place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 19, 2014

I also have two children that attend DSA, unfortunately I can't give this school anything more than one star. I want to first state that there are a few very caring teachers who go over and beyond. A very few is not enough though. Both of my kids have been bullied and discriminated against by not only students but specific teachers as well. The administration and staff are so busy tooting their own horn that they are completely disconnected about what truly goes on there. There are a handful of students who get all the attention and the rest are casually left to fall in the cracks. Both my children were so excited to attend DSA. They were both passionate about their majors, and now they are both begging my husband and I to put them in another school. Don't believe this school when they speak about how diverse they strive to be, the hallways are proof alone that it is nothing close to representing the demographics of Denver. Basically, if I would have known 4 years ago what I know now I would have never subjected my kids to such an elitist school. Its too bad administration could care less. I agree with the summed up review before mine.....TOXIC!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2014

My daughter attended 8th grade as a visual arts major, and overall I think she was satisifed with her major instructors. Her major objection to the school was how some students were allowed to run rough shod over other students. More seriously, the administration did not immediately respond to problamatic situations and to some extent tolerate very negative behaviors. Moreover, I was quite surprised that some 8th graders did bring in alcohol on campus during the school day. Finally, the school is very beholden to test scores from the beginning of the year. My daughter scored poorly on a math exam and the school then said she would not be able to take geometry until 10th or 11th grade. She is now enrolled at a different art school (LACHSA) is doing extremely well in geometry as a ninth grader.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2013

This is truly a great school. All students are involved in some type of arts (visual, theater, music, dance,stagecraft, creative writing) major. They have an excellent oportunity to develop as artists because the school provides a minimum of 90 min. every day for arts classes. Students' arts majors structure a major part of their lives. They make friends in their own dicipline as well as others, when collaborating on projects such as the school musical. There are performances year round, so it's always "showtime". The academic classes go very well because the kids are happy since they have an outlet for expressing their creativity. Finally the teachers and administrators are first-rate. This is a school that would do well, without being forced to "be accountable". The school is great because the staff loves their jobs and believe wholeheartedly in what they are doing!
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted November 13, 2012

As a graduate I consider myself truly blessed to have attended this institution. It opened my mind to so many different people and ideas. It really broke the mold in terms of what a "normal" highschool should be. No cliques - everyone was too weird to exclude anybody. I can name every single one of the people I graduated with and tell something about them. Creativity - Many of my teachers were also artists and many of my assignments reflected that. Maturity - I feel that my world view is far beyond my years Talent - I met some of the most gifted & inspiring people There were downsides. Given the professional climate of the school, we were relegated to our majors almost exclusively. As a 5 year theatre major I never once worked with film majors. The counseling department was definitely lacking in providing college options outside our majors. There is definitely a lack of diversity, as a black male I never felt excluded, but not always accepted. I didn't receive a normal high school experience and wouldnt have it any other way


Posted May 4, 2012

As a graduate of DSA, I can confidently say that this school was the best thing to ever happen to me. It made me who I am today, and introduced me to the most intelligent, passionate, and talented individuals I have ever met. My gratitude for what this school has done for me, both academically and artistically, is unbounded. I recommend it in the highest esteem possible for a high school/middle school. It will shape who you are and introduce you to your soulmates.


Posted January 8, 2012

This is our daughter's 5th year at DSA. Her experience has been mixed with many highs and lows. While the arts majors provide a conservatory-like environment, it comes with a cost. There is so much pressure to perform and be the best that we fear our daughter will be burned out before she graduates from high school. Our daughter routinely has upwards of two hours of homework per night in her major in addition to academic homework. Add in rehearsals and mandatory attendance at performances, and there is little to no time for our daughter to do anything else. Test scores are high due to the fact that the vast majority of the students at the school are naturally advanced, evidenced by the fact that all students are enrolled in honors courses as a default and must opt out in order to take the standard course (which is somehow considered sub-par). During times when our daughter needed extra help, it was like pulling teeth to get it and she was made to feel that something must be wrong with her. While I love the premise behind the school, there are definitely areas for improvement to ensure balance and health for students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2011

This is my daughter's first year at DSA. We were a little tentaive since she came from an amazing parochial school that had high academics. We have been pleasantly surprised. She is allowed to focus on her love of dance and take honors math and honors science classes. Instead of recess and PE she can dance and get her academics in. The biggest differences I've seen is that the academic instructors also support the arts, students can be individuals and accepted, the school is clean, the students and faculty are polite and respectful of one another, there is no bullying, homework assignments seem to be coordinated by instructors so there is never an overwhelming amount on a particular night and there is no "busy work" assignments given, and finally there is always a feeling of excitement in the air. We drive over an hour and a half each way for her to attend and she loves it!! What else could you ask for?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2011

I attend D.S.S.T, we have a 100% graduation and college acceptence rate. Schools like Harvard,Stanford, and DU


Posted April 25, 2011

My daughter will not start at DSA until the start of next year and I might possibly have a different opinion then, but here is the research I have done. When you go to the Colorado Department of Education Website and look at the CSAP comparisons, you will see that DSA is really second to no other public school in the district. They even beat out science and technology on most scores. At the acceptance meeting we went to in the spring they talked extensively about how they plan on meeting the state eduction budget cuts. All of their next years budget is going to faculty and they guaranteed that no class size will exceed 28. Coming from Jeffco where my daughter's next year class size is looking closer to 40, I am thrilled. We are going to have to pay higher fees for materials, but personally I would rather do that, then have staff reductions. The principal was very adament that BOTH accedemic and artistic GPA had to be maintained, or your child would be asked to not return the following year. Again, I am thrilled. Most students are expected to be in the honors programs and high expectations in all areas are standard. This school far exceeds any area public school I have seen
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 16, 2011

In the first few years, we were ecstatic about the possibilities for our very creative, gifted & talented / exceptionally intelligent & caring young guy at DSA. 7 yrs later-not so sure. The teachers range from incredible to absolutely terrible, with incredible in the serious minority. Since we started at DSA, it's slipped down on the CSAP rankings, even though they relentlessly teach to the test. I wouldn't rank academics as excellent, but merely sufficient. Our kid has suffered academically due to the way things are there. I put the blame on some rotten apple teachers as well as a couple of terrible principals (the current is an upgrade). Arts Majors: where the problem lies. with so much demand placed on the students that their academics suffer. Academia & arts depts don't coordinate well. We're always fighting for excused absences & makeup work due to the rampant disorganization. The different arts DO NOT cross-pollinate AT ALL. If you're in vocal, then you're in vocal. If you're in theater, then, you're there ONLY. It seems there's a cabal of over-excited parents who wish to live vicariously through their children. The same could be said of some of the arts teachers also.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2010

When my son was accepted at Denver School of the Arts my biggest concern was that the academics may not be the best. I was happily mistaken. DSA consistently rates Excellent or High in the standardized state tests and they have a 99% graduation rate. More schools should incorporate arts and academics. This combination produces well rounded, intellegent, cultured and interesting young people.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 29, 2010

Great school for the arts, by Denver standards. But, if your child is academically advanced, consider a private alternative for arts training and a better HS>
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2010

Can't say enough good things about DSA. My childs first year there has been the best possible educational exeprience I could have hoped for.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
95%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

131 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
68%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
92%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

135 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

171 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

171 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

171 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
72%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

171 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
77%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

168 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

168 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
94%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 55% in 2013.

168 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
84%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
77%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 49% in 2013.

165 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students87%
Female84%
Male93%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English87%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant87%

Reading

All Students97%
Female98%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant97%

Writing

All Students92%
Female92%
Male93%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)93%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English93%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female81%
Male76%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English79%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant79%

Reading

All Students96%
Female97%
Male94%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant96%

Writing

All Students94%
Female98%
Male88%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English94%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female69%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)31%
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)77%
Free lunch eligible39%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English69%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant70%

Reading

All Students90%
Female93%
Male84%
Black (not Hispanic)69%
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Free lunch eligible74%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%

Science

All Students77%
Female81%
Male71%
Black (not Hispanic)31%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Free lunch eligible44%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English77%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant77%

Writing

All Students85%
Female90%
Male76%
Black (not Hispanic)69%
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Free lunch eligible70%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English84%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant85%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female58%
Male64%
Black (not Hispanic)18%
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)69%
Free lunch eligible52%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English61%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant61%

Reading

All Students89%
Female91%
Male86%
Black (not Hispanic)59%
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Free lunch eligible72%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant89%

Writing

All Students83%
Female87%
Male77%
Black (not Hispanic)65%
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Free lunch eligible71%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English84%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students49%
Female44%
Male59%
Black (not Hispanic)19%
Asiann/a
Hispanic48%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Free lunch eligible38%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch50%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities50%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English48%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant49%

Reading

All Students94%
Female95%
Male93%
Black (not Hispanic)95%
Asiann/a
Hispanic84%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)96%
Free lunch eligible94%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant94%

Science

All Students76%
Female73%
Male80%
Black (not Hispanic)29%
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Free lunch eligible56%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English77%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant76%

Writing

All Students79%
Female83%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)52%
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)87%
Free lunch eligible81%
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English79%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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State
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Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

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State
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ACT participation

94%

Average ACT score

24

Graduation rate

97%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

3 This rating is based on composite ACT scores from 2012-13 and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2011-12. ACT participation represents the percentage of 11th graders taking the ACT. Because the ACT is mandated in Colorado high schools, ACT participation is NOT included in the GreatSchools rating.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 64% 56%
Hispanic 15% 32%
Black 8% 5%
Two or more races 7% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 14%N/A41%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
  • Performing arts
  • Visual arts
Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
  • Opera
  • Orchestra
  • Theory
Performing and written arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Improv
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Computer animation
  • Video / Film production

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Honors track
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Patti Bippus
Fax number
  • (720) 424-1845

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Advanced placement courses
  • Honors track
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
  • Performing arts
  • Visual arts
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Tutoring
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Ceramics
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Chamber music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Jazz band
  • Opera
  • Orchestra
  • Theory
Performing arts
  • Creative writing
  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Improv
  • Poetry
Media arts
  • Computer animation
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Community service
  • Student council/government
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize cultural events
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

7111 Montview Blvd
Denver, CO 80220
Website: Click here
Phone: (720) 424-1700

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