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GreatSchools Rating

Dennison Elementary School

Public | K-6 | 625 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 8 ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted June 24, 2014

We wanted this school to work for us, we really did. This school has many wonderful teachers, staff, and parents. This school doesn't work for all types of children. Everything is a competition for performance and grades. This school isn't nurturing for children regardless of ones strengths or weaknesses. Your child can be bright, creative, and smart, and still feel like a failure in this school because of the grading standards. Should children be ultra competitive when they are in the elementary school? What pushes some kids to work harder (school strategies), crushes other kids and makes them feel inferior. My suggestion to Dennison is to realize there are other types of kids. Bright, artistic, funny kids that are shy, introverted, that have all sorts of strengths and weaknesses. My child is more than just a test score. When everything at school is a competition a child loses. They give up, they stop trying and assume they will never measure up. Please, start valuing the different types of students that need encouragement instead of criticism. Nurture these kids and have fun with them (do a crazy hair day), treat them like kids. You are burning out your students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2014

My daughter left another Jeffco school last year and enrolled in Dennison. I can actually compare this school to another Jeffco school, as we have experienced both. First, they use an actual grading system (A,B,C) instead of the 1,2,3,4 style. This allows for both the student and parent to actually see the student's true grade on a test or assignment. The school sends weekly reports, so parents can monitor how their student is doing. I do not feel the homework is too much. My daughter is doing well, but does have to work hard to maintain an A/B average in her classes. The teachers do not put up with the behavior problem students and they are dealt with appropriately. The school is very academic, and stresses the importance of hard work and personal responsibility. This school is a good fit for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2013

I still don t understand this hours of homework theme that is being propagated in these reviews. Yes, EVERY STUDENT AT DENNISON, including Kindergarteners, DOES HOMEWORK. If it requires a student HOURS of homework, then maybe the rigor of this school isn t a good choice. Rarely does it take more than 30 minutes in the lower grades & rarely more than an hour in the upper grades. Usually in the upper grades, homework is given on Friday for the following week so that kids have the opportunity to work on it over the weekend. There are plenty of families who have music lessons & sports in addition to the expected work. Not only does the author of 9/12 post need a class in time management but perhaps one in basic math concepts as well. I have no idea what MANY kids are too burned out to go on to D Evelyn means. There are 90 6th graders who get priority placement for getting into D Evelyn. I would be hard pressed, in any given year, to find more than 5% of kids who opt out of going to D Evelyn, & that would include those who move districts or even out of state in addition to the so called "burned out" kids. I would hardly equate less than 5 of 90 as equal to the word MANY .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2013

Wow obviously a disgruntled parent wrote the previous review. This school is absolutely about educating the kids. If it was about making the parents feel good the parents would have far more influence in curriculum choices and even a voice in which teacher little Johnny gets. If the previous author means feel good about getting the best public education WITHOUT a required test to get in (i.e. a gifted and talented magnet) or the bureaucracy of a charter school, then yes most parents feel good about the education that is taught at Dennison. In order to improve our children s chances of being leaders (to include globally) we cannot rest on our laurels, as so many schools in the U.S. have done. Presently, the U.S. is ranked 17th in the world in education. At Dennison, the philosophy is such that the bar is set high and we believe that every kid can reach it. 99% of the time every kid at Dennison can and does so consistently, with sustained growth.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 12, 2013

This school is about making the parents feel good, not about educating children. The whole school seems to take pride in "if you need to know it next year, you can know it this year." Which would be fine if they would teach instead of letting the parents pick up the slack by assigning hours of homework. If you or your children want to do anything besides school, go somewhere else. If you want your child to be given an A for getting all his math right, instead of a C because he had sloppy handwriting, go somewhere else. If you think that because you are teaching the kids more than they are learning at school, and that because you spend hours a week doing things to help the teachers, aides, parking lot and everything else function, would give you some kind of credibility when you see with your own eyes inappropriate actions by personnel, think again. Any suggestion of wrongdoing meets with instant scorn that that the school makes sure your kids feel. You will never hear of a problem here, but you will hear of a great many people who "aren't cut out for this school". A truly great school teaches, not eliminates. A final note is that many kids are too burned out to go on to D'Evelyn
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2013

Excellent school for preparing your child for the real world. High expectations and rigorous coursework keep the kids busy but not unreasonably so. Homework is less than 30 minutes per night unless they're working on a long-term project. They use A,B,C grading so what you see is what you get score-wise, unlike other Jeffco schools that use the ambiguous 4,3,2,1 scoring. My son has always gotten straight A's with minimal effort, so we make sure to keep him busy with after school classes and the optional online math program. Yes, the school has many rules but luckily my son thrives in that environment; he's definitely not a Montessori-type kid. Dennison is preparing him for the more rigorous D'Evelyn, which in turn will prepare him for an easy transition into college. We have had excellent teachers who have made learning fun while keeping it challenging. The principal always listens to our concerns and has been a complete advocate for our son. If anything, the school has been too easy for our son, & that's okay because he's getting a good education while still enjoying school. Most kids can handle the school's rigor, it tends to be the parents who often can't handle it!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 17, 2013

As time goes on, I have become less enthusiastic about this much sought after school. As with most schools, there are some excellent teachers and some mediocre teachers. The current principle also leaves something to be desired. Children are turned into academic machines at very young ages. Instead of being rewarded for hard work, they seem to be regularly told that their best isn't good enough. As my children progress through the grades, I have noticed increasingly unrealistic academic expectations from the teachers. I do like the high level of parental involvement at this school. This school is great for some families, but I have heard many other parents express similar concerns, and it seems that an increasingly large number of children are being pulled from the school every year. While this school may offer high test scores and an excellent "great schools" rating, think twice before putting your child into this school. Our family is considering making the transition to another school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2013

We took our boys out of Dennison, its the best thing we ever did!!!! Our boys are thriving at a 10 rated great school. Dennison is not the same place it was 3 years ago.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 15, 2013

My son is in K at this school and we have been very pleased with the support of his teacher, paraprofessionals, and principal. Everyone is very caring and they have gone above and beyond to try and make sure his needs are met. I do find the behavior policies to be very strict and it takes some getting used to for some kids, but all in all I know that it's necessary. It's very challenging academically, but my child thrives on that, so it's not an issue. Overall we are very pleased with this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 11, 2012

Our children attended Dennison and continued to D Evelyn. We believed that these schools would provide the best education for the money, based on parent reviews and scholastic performance. My children are above average intelligence, but are not academically gifted and they struggled to get C s. School performance is important, but growth is a far better indicator of a schools ability to educate then testing scores. Student GPA & class ranking will matter more to Colleges then a school ranking. Dennison expects parents to tutor their children 2-4hrs a night. This is the secrete to Dennison s success, along with a high drop out rate. Any school that extends the school day and eliminates the lower performing students, will have better test scores. Neither Dennison nor D Evelyn help struggling students. We found it necessary hire tutors then later, transfer our children from D Evelyn other schools. Remember, childhood is about laughter and fun, not just scholastic prestige. Dennison/D Evelyn are for gifted and mature children only. They foster good conservative morals and the families are great. Many of the teachers are remarkable though some are ineffective and uncaring.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2012

I have two children at this school and couldn't be happier. Not only are the academics top-notch, but the parent involvement is great. If you are looking for a great education for your child AND a community you can get involved in, this is a great choice. Yes, it's a lottery, so don't get your hopes up; just go to the information meeting, apply, and wait and see. In the meantime, you can check out other fantastic Jeffco schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2012

Of course the lottery process has zero transparency...it's a lottery! I get it, it's a nail bitter we've been there. Openings change from year to year depending on how many incoming siblings are registered. One year it can be 20 opens another year it can be 40, maybe more, I don't work in the office. The year my child came in we were in the low 20s and I didn't hear anything for months. However, I do know the staff cannot tell you the number they are working on because they have outstanding calls to families with lower numbers. The staff need a decline or acceptance of the open offer before the staff can move onto the next. It is my understanding that this process isn't complete until the middle of summer. Let us not blame the staff but rather those who have a low lottery number and don't get back to the school in a timely fashion. It is egregious and outright unreasonable for the previous parent to give this school a one star when clearly this person know nothing of the standards, academics, teachers, etc. of this truly incredibly awesome life changing incomparable elementary school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 19, 2012

Good luck getting in though. Admissions are by lottery only. The lottery process has zero transparency. They don't tell you how many openings they have each year, how many siblings got in or how the number you are assigned fits in with any of these other numbers. At the very least they should post a website saying the next opening will go to number XX. Then you would know how far your number was from the current number. No that would be way to hard for weary administrators. I mean updating a number every week or so is hard work. Why would they want to lift a finger to let concerned parents know if they are even close to getting in to this incredibly awesome life changing incomparable elementary school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2012

Be prepared to "fit in" at Dennison with both the faculty and parents. If you have issues with the curriculum or teachers, chances are you will be ostracized and given the cold shoulder. Academically, Dennison is a good school but still follows the Jeffco curriculum. Your kids will get graded for things not related to homework or tests. They push hard at this school, so you will have to deal with those side-effects. Two to three hours of homework a night is common so if you want your child to have a life outside of school, this is not the place.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 19, 2012

I realy interested this school. I want my kids go to Dennison. But I dont know how to enter my kids for this school


Posted January 24, 2012

As great as all the reviews are, there are some downsides to this school. It feels very punitive. At recess before a party, the teacher said, "If you don't behave we won't have the party." Come on! In the small lunch room, the helper uses a megaphone and what I've heard are hurrying words and punishments of quiet time b/c of too much enthusiasm. On the playground the helper is very controlling, using a megaphone, too. Parents are not encouraged to drop by just to observe; volunteering spots fill up quickly (great!) but if you don't have a smart phone forget about getting a spot. The librarian seems like a nice woman but with the kids she rarely smiles or uses an enthusiastic voice. The parents are fantastic; community seems very right wing conservative. One last criticism with most JeffCo schools, they reward with candy. People seem intimidated to make changes b/c of the difficulty of admission and good reputation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 17, 2012

I am a parent of 4 sons who have moved through this phenomenal school. It is nothing short of the highest quality education a parent could hope for. Hard work - yes, worth the effort - absolutely! We are so, so thankful for the strong start our children have been given at Dennison.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2010

Even though public school funding has languished lately because of multiple reasons, the students, teachers, administration, and parents of Dennison have "brought their level up to the game." We do "more with less" than any elementary school in Colorado. Excellence is the only way to describe the Dennison school culture. This is truly a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 13, 2010

Dennison is an absolutely phenomenal school. I have experenced the standard Jeffco (4 yrs) and the Jeffco Gifted and Talented Program (5 yrs), and I would highly recomend Dennison if you are looking for a solid curriculum base and an academic challenge for your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2008

This school has outstanding test scores, which would lead one to believe that this is a school for 'gifted' children. The fact is that there are children with many different acedemic needs and this school does an AMAZING job of teaching all of these children. The school uses a 'total classroom' learning approach and there is no ability grouping. As a parent of a child who struggles, this approach has been helpful to identify areas of weakness. At schools that are ability based, I believe my child would have slipped through the cracks. The commitment from parents, teachers, and administrators at this school is outstanding! I feel very lucky to be a part of this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
99%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
94%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
93%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
90%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

88 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

87 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students98%
Female98%
Male98%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch99%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant98%

Reading

All Students96%
Female95%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant96%

Writing

All Students90%
Female91%
Male89%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students99%
Female100%
Male98%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch99%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant99%

Reading

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic95%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant98%

Writing

All Students95%
Female100%
Male92%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic90%
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch99%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant99%

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English100%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant100%

Science

All Students97%
Female93%
Male100%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant97%

Writing

All Students95%
Female96%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant95%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female94%
Male95%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English95%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant94%

Reading

All Students99%
Female98%
Male100%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)100%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch99%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English99%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant99%

Writing

All Students97%
Female96%
Male97%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities99%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant97%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 56%
Hispanic 15% 32%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 6% 3%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 8%N/A41%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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401 Independence St
Lakewood, CO 80226
Phone: (303) 982-6382

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