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GreatSchools Rating

Littleton Academy

Charter | K-8

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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36 reviews of this school


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Posted August 4, 2014

Excellent school. Excellent teachers, administration and staff. My children have been attending this school for 5 years and we've been extremely happy. I have one child that is high achieving and 1 child with learning difficulties - they have both been given exceptional support and have received excellent educations at LA. Yes, there are high expectations regarding both academics and behavior but certainly nothing unreasonable and I'm thrilled my children will be thoroughly prepared for high school. The Principal works tirelessly and is truly dedicated to the school, the children, the staff and the parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2014

To the person who said they got "yelled at"for wearing a green bow in their hair: I don't believe that for a second. Whether anyone approves of the methods at this school, it's clear that the motives of all involved, is to give the kids the best chance at life they can. The previous principal and vice principal were excellent - they were in lived, invested, and were true to the curriculum and student handbook. No one was out to get children. But they were people of high integrity and therefore they expected the very clearly laid out rules to be followed. I want that kind of strength and integrity in a school that teaches core virtues. The new principal and vice principal seem similarly motivated - they strive to do the right thing for the kids and the school and do their best to stay true to the founding principles of LA. They may not be perfect, but they definitely care.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 29, 2014

What special ed there is no special ed at Littleton academy if you have problems and fail They don't do anything about it


Posted November 10, 2013

I am a student at Littleton Academy. My school is a wonderful school in many ways. Some ways are: 1) NO bullies allowed 2) Excellent teachers 3) Nice students. My school can improve by being a little easy on what kind of shoes you wear. For example, if my shoes are untied, they MUST be tied right then and there. ALl in all, my school is a wonderful school


Posted September 4, 2012

we've been at LA since 2006 and my child just entered middle school there -- I was prepared to set aside hours each evening for homework but it has been totally manageable. The teachers give them plenty of direction and time at school plus there are study halls available -- in addition to teachers asking that students come see them if they need extra help. With a new principal and vice principal on board, the school is taking lots of steps to ensure that a core knowledge rigorous education through 8th grade is not only attainable it can also be FUN. Kudos to all the great staff and teachers at LA -- it is so obvious that you all really care about the kids.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2012

to all those that insist that the homework is ridiculous, i know that - i am a student! however hard all that homework is, the teachers give you tools to help manage it. they also make sure that you use the tools. as far as i know, the uniforms help keep bullying down, and the rules are mostly pretty reasonable. i might be wrong about this, but it seems to me that what matters most is how the teachers, not the administration, interact with the kids. all the teachers are super nice (i think) and to me as a student, that's what matters most.


Posted January 12, 2012

My kids have received a private school education at a public school by attending Littleton Academy. While they have really disliked some aspects of the school (uniforms and homework) they also knew it was preparing them for high school and life. For years alumni told us high school was a breeze, and then we found out it was true. My youngest no longer complains about the homework because he knows it is getting him ready for high school and beyond.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2011

We sent all of our children through Littleton Academy (from 1996 - 2008), and while each of them found a rule to hate (dress code, or discipline, or something) and each resented the homework from time to time, as they watched the neighbors playing outside, reaching high school cured that! Every single one of our children has thanked us for having the fortitude to withstand the complaints and provide the support to ensure that they received the best educational foundation we could provide. As they met new challenges in high school with less trepidation than their "regular public school" peers and achieved successes that surprised and delighted their sometimes jaded teachers, they realized that the knowledge they'd gained and, more importantly, the ability to think critically that they'd developed at LA far overshadowed any rules or minutes missed outside. My family, knowing what we know now, would make exactly the same decision again to attend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2011

What Charter Schools like Littleton Academy provide is an opportunity for parents to be intimately involved in their child's education. As a very involved parent of two children at Littleton Academy, this has made all the difference in the quality of their education. Is there a lot of homework? Yes. Is the discipline strict? Yes. Does the school set these high standards because they know these kids are capable of reaching them? Yes. Do I have a voice if I feel something is not right, or my child needs something more? Absolutely. If you are a parent who wants to be very involved in your child's education - including helping with homework every single night, attending multiple parent/teacher meetings, volunteering at least 20-hours per year, supporting the discipline standards at home as well as at school - then Littleton Academy is the school for you. If you answered "no" to any of those questions, then it may not be the right fit.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2011

I really question the 4 star - when looking at all the reviews they have a few recent good rating (I wonder why??) but many that follow are bad. The adminstration is leaving and I am sure it will be a much more positive experience at the school. Children need to have a school enviroment that is positive, offer experiences of caring and support, not adversarial, this produces great academic learning. Thanks to the governing board it might turn around to be an outstanding school like it was years ago. This would offer a culture that the kids love, teachers can teach and the parents are proud.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 11, 2011

I graduated from Littleton Academy after attending for 8 years. I must admit that as a student I found the rules annoying and silly but when do kids ever know what's best for them? Looking back I am thankful for the uniform, the homework, and the high standards. I know so much about the English language that normal public schools never seem to mention as well as a cursory knowledge of spanish and an outstanding knowledge of mathematics. I learned how to spell and write both cursive and print legibly. I found that I was given enough homework to sufficiently learn the material without ever feeling overwhelmed. I practiced gymnastics 4 nights a week and was still able to complete my homework because my parents and teachers helped me develop good time management skills that I practiced all through high school and still use now in college. My favorite teachers are still at Littleton Academy and I wish I had met anyone as effective in high school. This is an excellent school.


Posted March 7, 2011

I graduated from Littleton Academy after attending for 6 years. Upon entering high school, I was surprised at how extremely uneducated the rest of my peers seemed to be. As a middle schooler, I used to complain constantly about L.A.: too much homework, too many rules, no one cares about me. I see now that my complaints were nothing but an excuse for attention. I received the best education possible. I received practice in self-discipline. I had the opportunity to be creative and inventive (as opposed to the rote learning that public schools give). I felt safe. Littleton Academy should be considered an EXCELLENT school all-around.


Posted February 12, 2011

We love this school. It exceeds my expectations in every way. My son is very happy there and enjoys learning very much. Teachers are nice and caring and the staff are great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2010

I have submitted 3 reviews of this school and none were shining. Each time my reviews have been removed -- most likely by school administrators themselves. Here's the scoop for prospective parents in a nutshell: the homework is excessive, the families are largely ultra-conservative, there's a religious group that prays for the soccer field's grass to turn green, and there's very little in the curriculum that encourages free-thinking and creativity. Parents drive Lexus SUVs and Maseratis. Parental feedback is unwelcome. If you don't mind relinquishing quality time with your children at home, sign them up to attend Littleton Academy. Childhood is short...3 hours of homework each night is outrageous.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2010

My children attend LA and they have become increasingly unhappy at this school. The homework workload seems to be overly excessive, they seem more concerned about getting great evaluation test scores out of the students than actually nurturing them, and the behavioral and dress policies are what you would expect from a military school. Many of the teachers are good people and they really care about the students, but like the students themselves, many appear to be unhappy. This may be due to the the fact that the administration is close-minded, strict, and unwilling to compromise.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 14, 2010

There is a significant difference between Littleton Academy's Middle School and Elementary School. Elementary staff and curriculum is fantastic (5 stars) but the kids are still young enough that compliance with the strict envirionment is easy to enforce. We've had 3 kids at the school, one is still there and will stay through 5th grade. Unless they get their hands around dealing with Middle School better, we will likely pull him for 6th grade like his siblings.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2010

We have two kids at LA and are extremely happy with the school. Great curriculum and staff. This school is very challenging and certainly not for everyone. I agree with the statement in one of the reviews "that the standards are not unreasonable. Many parents choose LA because of it's high academic, behavioral and test standards and then complain when they are upheld." The school has a strong math and science program. In 2009, science and math CSAP results for LA were extremely high (top 5 in the state and #1 in the district). This is a great school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2010

Littleton Academy is losing 8 more middle school kids to Powell next year. (mostly boys) The admin. comes down hard on boys who step over the line a few times. The lines drawn give little room. Their philosophy is to give as many infractions as possible to force change. Humiliation in front of their peers is also a part of the discipline system. Read the handbook. If you have a middle school boy who is outgoing and not passive think carefully about sending him to L.A.They forget the pre-frontal cortex of these boys is under developed. Instead of meeting the situation with some discipline and some humor, they are militant. There is no grace. This also happens in the elementary.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2010

Littleton Acadamy has the most amazing teachers around. Through structured curriculum, the children build a wonderful base of knowledge that will help them throughout their education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

Littleton Academy is a top rated school in the state due to the curriculum and the staff that works together to teach the students. The parent community play a huge part in keeping the staff and students motivated.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
94%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
82%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
89%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
96%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
77%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
91%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
98%

2012

 
 
94%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

51 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
86%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
96%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
96%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
92%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

50 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students96%
Female100%
Male93%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant96%

Reading

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)98%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant98%

Writing

All Students83%
Female96%
Male71%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities84%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English82%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant83%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female90%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English92%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant92%

Reading

All Students87%
Female83%
Male91%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English87%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant87%

Writing

All Students89%
Female93%
Male83%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)86%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant89%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students96%
Female93%
Male100%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)95%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant96%

Reading

All Students90%
Female90%
Male91%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%

Science

All Students69%
Female69%
Male70%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)66%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English73%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant69%

Writing

All Students79%
Female79%
Male78%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English79%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant79%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female89%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English91%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant92%

Reading

All Students98%
Female100%
Male96%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English98%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant98%

Writing

All Students90%
Female89%
Male91%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female82%
Male93%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)89%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English89%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant88%

Reading

All Students94%
Female96%
Male93%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)94%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant94%

Writing

All Students92%
Female96%
Male89%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)91%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English93%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant92%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female92%
Male88%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%

Reading

All Students96%
Female100%
Male92%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English96%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant96%

Science

All Students90%
Female92%
Male88%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)92%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English90%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant90%

Writing

All Students94%
Female100%
Male88%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)97%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English94%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant94%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

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State
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9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
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8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 73% 56%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 15% 3%
Hispanic 6% 32%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Black 1% 5%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 5%N/A41%
Male 50%N/A51%
Female 50%N/A49%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1200 West Mineral Ave
Littleton, CO 80120
Phone: (303) 798-5252

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