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GreatSchools Rating

Loveland Classical School

Public | K-12 | 630 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 18 ratings
2013:
Based on 27 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

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Principal leadership

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45 reviews of this school


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Posted May 23, 2014

A local newspaper keeps writing about this school. Be fore you take into consideration of all of what they say, please remember that this school only three years old and still getting the kinks worked out. If you want to learn more about the school, go to the open house next time there is one.Thanks. =)


Posted April 22, 2014

The Core Knowledge curriculum with an emphasis on classics is fantastic! The Riggs system used to teach reading, writing, & spelling makes so much sense, as does Singapore math. The curriculum is academically challenging, but that's been good for my kids. My 5th grader told me she would be bored if she were back at her old school. Even at the elementary level, teachers focus on their specialty (history, English, math, science, etc.) My kids are learning so much, things that I never got to study in school (and I grew up in this school district). The teachers are fantastic, and the school community (parents, volunteers, etc.) is great. Class sizes are still large, but there are two teachers in the classroom, and students are held to a high standard of behavior. I'm also impressed with the character virtues that are emphasized. Every time I go to the school, there are students holding the doors open for me or offering me their chair, etc. There are also many extracurricular activities being offered (soccer, basketball, volleyball, track, Spanish club, choir, drama club, Battle of the Books club, knitting club, etc.) I'm grateful to have this option for my children's education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2014

Loveland Classical Schools is a wonderful *choice* tuition-free charter school in Loveland, Colorado. We love this school, especially its departmentalization of the elementary school - where area-specific teachers in all the core curriculum (math, science, history and English) rotate through each elementary classroom teaching only the area they are passionate about! The elementary also rotates through art, PE, music and foreign language (Spanish or Latin, depending on grade level) each week. The teachers are absolutely wonderful and my kids love it! I have never seen such engaged students (not just mine) in classrooms. Come in for a visit (or attend an Informational Meeting) and you will see one of the best kept secrets in Loveland!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2014

Loveland Classical Schools doesn't look like most schools. Distractions on the walls, with attire and the overall environment are minimized for the sake of learning. Kids at our school know a lot about history, why history is important to our future and how it infuses all other areas of life. They also frequently get to 'live' history through the various events throughout the year whether they are in Kindergarten or High School! The teachers provide individual attention to any child who needs it in any subject whether they are struggling or need to be more challenged. We love the principal and his innovative ideas about education. Our kids are learning more than they ever did at a standard public school and we are grateful for the choice Loveland Classical Schools offers!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2014

Loveland Classical School is a one-of-a-kind place. Students at all levels have a different teacher for each subject. A Classroom Coordinator (in the elementary grades) is the consistent face in the room. Teachers are experts in their field--so excited and passionate about their subject. I love how my children chatter on and on at night about what they are learning. This school also teaches from source documents. Another one of my favorite things is the way this school teaches character education during their Core Virtues time. The students are not only learning how to have virtuous character but they are watching their teachers live it out for them day in and day out! I don't know of another public school that devotes time to teaching character like this school does. Our family LOVES this school! I would urge you to check it out!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 9, 2014

Loveland Classical Schools has made tremendous growth in it's first three years. It's focus is on great character and academics. Offering Spanish from grades K-3, Latin from grades 4-8, and elective offerings of French, Spanish, Latin, and Greek, students are immersed in languages from an early age. The Singapore Math curriculum results in students averaging at least a grade level ahead by middle school. The RIGGS phonics program allows students to decode words, opening up the entirety of the English written word. The teachers are observed at least quarterly, and stay at least an hour late every day for staff development and discussion. Parents can keep up date of their students progress through projected grades posted on ParentPortal and parent-teacher meetings offered on selected Fridays. A fundamental tenant of Loveland Classical Schools is that by holding the standard high, students will achieve excellence. The mission of assisting parents in developing young minds with virtuous character, critical thinking skills, and a passion for learning to become exceptional community stewards is not just lip service, but the compass for the schools' educational community.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted April 9, 2014

I chose to come teach at this school because it seemed clearly THE place where I would be able to grow as a teacher. I was right, and I have never looked back. The staff and faculty are truly a special group of people with uncanny commitment to our students and our curriculum. If you want your child immersed in a serious curriculum full of rich academic material that changes lives, this is the place for you. Students are given the right kind of structure which helps them grow and learn to become responsible, free citizens.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted March 25, 2014

This is our second year at LCS, we love the way they teach! In the beggining It was hard to adjust to all the homework, but now We have our rutine and we love it. My daughter has learned so many Things for a second grader, she loves her teachers, and all the rules! I like to see how they focus on Building Character in our children, since nowdays that is something That needs to be reinforced at schools because it is our first job as parents. I am very happy to have made the decision to put my daughter in such a wonderful place Full of wonderful people!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2014

Dreadful decision on my part! The homework that comes home is completely not "grade appropriate". I just hope that the school close to my house on the north end of town takes us back. I suppose they have to (thank God). What I like? Character education, school uniforms, and new facility. What I do not like? everything else. We will not be returning next fall.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2014

We have been at LCS for 2 years. The 1st year was a little bit of a struggle as to be expected, with a new school. However, this year has been a HUGE struggle with a couple of his teachers. Our son is on an IEP and has been since he started preschool. When we started this year, it was like we had to start all over with getting the teachers involved with his IEP. The special education staff resources are limited. They do what they can with what they have. Some of the classroom teachers, are terrible. They may have the knowledge of the subject they are teaching, but they do not know how to "teach". Especially children with learning disabilities. They have to be pushed to take the initiative to help these kids. They are so involved in standing up for the curriculum and philosophy of the school and not standing up for the children. The community of LCS is great, but some are lacking in teaching skills beyond what comes out of the textbooks. We are starting to get some resolution. Mr. Yu has been great about working on the concerns that we have. We have seen some turn around, but not until after several meetings. We want this school to succeed & think it can.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2014

We are very happy with the school and its teachers and curriculum. There is passion in the teaching, and the classical education reflects our values.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 4, 2014

My two daughters just started LCS this year. We have been extremely pleased with the school. The teachers are phenomenal. I have never seen such professionalism and compassion for the students. My daughters are flourishing. The culture of the school is so pleasant. There is definitely a passion for teaching and the students learn so much. LCS is more than just academics though, I really appreciate the way the teachers reinforce important virtues that will help my daughters be productive, caring citizens as they grow. Mr. Yu's leadership is inspiring. I am so grateful to be a part of the LCS community and am thankful this school is in Loveland!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 31, 2014

I am a student at Loveland Classical Schools. This is my third year here and I absolutely love it! I am in 10th grade.Everyone is so welcoming and nice, we are all like a family there. Teachers care about all of us and work extra hard to help us understand what they are teaching us. The ciriculum is wonderful, last year 9th grade I learned about the Greeks and Romans. We read the Illiad and Odessey, the math and science teachers are great too they made sure that we understand everything and explain with patiencen. We get the opportunity to learn Greek, Latin, French and Spanish. I would not change this school for anything. I do not know what would be of me if I was not at Loveland Classical Schools. The teachers push you hard because they know we are capable of achieving. I would recommend this school to anyone this is an amazing school!


Posted January 30, 2014

This school does something so wonderful that I never thought it could happen in a public institution. Loveland Classical schools, while it does in fact teach it's students what is mandated by the district, facilitates thinking. It is a beautiful thing to see the teachers take a step back because their students want to solve the problem on their own. They never leave, for their rule at that point is that of a mentor, not one who gives answers because it's 'too hard'. Nothing is too hard at Loveland Classical Schools. The discipline found at L.C.S. is matched only with the ancient schooling traditions of old. Students of all kinds will emerge from L.C.S. as a steward to the community at large and a true individual.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted January 24, 2014

We have four children who attend this school and have been very pleased. The teachers and staff expect a lot from the students and the students in turn expect a lot from themselves and rise to those expectations. It is not always easy for the students to stretch themselves, but they learn and grow in ways that they did not while attending other schools. Our family dinner conversations are filled with interesting lessons in Latin, World history, the periodic table, and Italian ballads. The academic curriculum and character education is extraordinary and exactly what we want for our children to learn. Teachers are passionate about their students and the topics they teach. LCS has been a great fit for our family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 13, 2014

This school does what most others often claim to do: it strives to teach everybody, often giving opportunities for struggling learners to revisit previously taught material in new ways, while allowing students who understand the material quickly means to move forward and meet their potential. Honestly, I don't know how the teachers do it. You can really tell that the teachers here believe that love of learning is the purpose of education. The leadership can be different than other schools, but I have found it to be a positive. Mr. Yu, I know from talking to teachers, really expects his instructors to be accountable for the quality of their teaching. He really goes out of his way to hear parent concerns. Sometimes there can be confusion about events, but I have not found it to be out of the normal for middle schools in general. Some people do leave the school, but there is a lot of transitioning around in Thompson district in general for some reason.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 9, 2014

Putting my kids in this school was the biggest mistake I have ever made. Not only was the administrative staff a nightmare to communicate with; the "principal" and most teachers weren't any better! It would seem that no one here knows how to communicate with parents or their students. Furthermore, unless your child can get by teaching his/her self (because the teachers are a joke here) then I would suggest that you take your child elsewhere. This is the most unorganized, unethical, uneducated, elitist school I have EVER dealt with. It was the most horrible experience for my children and myself...I regret ever putting my kids in this school. The ONLY reason I gave it ANY stars is because I had to give at least one (according to this website). This school needs to be shut down or restructured with a REAL team of educators and leadership.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2014

We had such high hopes for this school after attending an information meeting last year. The teaching philosophy seems like such a great idea. Unfortunately, we were severely disappointed in how much the school over promises but under delivers. Our oldest child (4th grade) was consistently bored in most classes (math in particular), and our youngest struggles with a few social issues that really should have been addressed by an IEP. This school does not have the resources to put an IEP into place in kindergarten, and we were told we would have to wait until 1st grade, when they would reevaluate. The communication at the school is absolutely terrible. After school activities were constantly cancelled the day of with no notification to the parents - my child would call me after school to let me know I needed to leave work to come pick her up, because a club had been canceled. The front desk is very unhelpful & unable to answer questions that aren't on the school website. Security was also a big concern - too many adults allowed to roam the hallways without IDs being checked at the front desk.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2013

LCS and its faculty are no less than amazing. For the Instructors themselves not to care about tenure in order to teach at this excellent institution should tell one lots about the school itself. In speaking with, and getting to know the Instructors, you will find yourself in awe of the caliber of the individuals in addition to their backgrounds and teaching methodologies. The curriculum is exceptional at all grade levels and is meant to fully challenge each student to become the best version of themselves. This institution has changed my student's life forever - in a most positive manner. It is an honor and a privilege for us to have helped with ensuring the school would be operational in addition to having our child attend. He will be one of the very first graduating Seniors from LCS next year and he would be most happy to tell you that it has been the most positive experience in his young life to date. It is definitely worth checking into as it usurps any other public institution.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 9, 2013

I have a first grader there and it is the best school I could put my child in. There are so many things I love about the school: the riggs program, Singapore Math, the morning forums, Civil War reenactments, Roman days, everybody wear uniforms there's no labeling, they focus on academic achievement, hard work and having upstanding character. The kids love to learn and the teachers love to teach.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
65%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
81%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 51% in 2013.

61 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
37%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
75%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 53% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
57%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 65% in 2013.

60 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
91%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
61%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 57% in 2013.

59 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
56%

2012

 
 
75%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 62% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
48%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 73% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
72%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 58% in 2013.

71 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
37%

2012

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
71%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 61% in 2013.

52 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
60%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
31%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 67% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
73%
Science

The state average for Science was 52% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
39%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 56% in 2013.

34 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
50%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 39% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
22%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
67%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 55% in 2013.

23 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 34% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 70% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 51% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
n/a
Writing

The state average for Writing was 49% in 2013.

17 students were tested at this school in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
n/a
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female63%
Male56%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)60%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch61%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities60%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English60%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant59%

Reading

All Students82%
Female96%
Male71%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)82%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English83%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant82%

Writing

All Students48%
Female56%
Male41%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)49%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch48%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities50%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English48%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female50%
Male66%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English58%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant58%

Reading

All Students67%
Female61%
Male72%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant67%

Writing

All Students52%
Female54%
Male50%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)54%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch56%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities54%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English52%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant52%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female71%
Male62%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English68%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant67%

Reading

All Students76%
Female87%
Male64%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)80%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English78%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant76%

Science

All Students48%
Female52%
Male43%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)51%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch51%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities50%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English48%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant48%

Writing

All Students56%
Female71%
Male39%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)61%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch59%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities59%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English57%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant56%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female60%
Male64%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)68%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English65%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant63%

Reading

All Students86%
Female86%
Male86%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)85%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English85%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant86%

Writing

All Students66%
Female74%
Male58%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)70%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities68%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant67%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students37%
Female41%
Male30%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)45%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch45%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities40%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English37%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant37%

Reading

All Students67%
Female69%
Male65%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant67%

Writing

All Students67%
Female69%
Male65%
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)74%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English67%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant69%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students41%
Female36%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)48%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch36%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English45%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant41%

Reading

All Students79%
Female68%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)88%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English84%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant79%

Science

All Students65%
Female50%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English71%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant65%

Writing

All Students71%
Female68%
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)76%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch68%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English74%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant71%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students17%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)24%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch25%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities19%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English21%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant17%

Reading

All Students61%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)71%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English63%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant61%

Writing

All Students48%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)53%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunch63%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities52%
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English47%
Migrantn/a
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant48%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

Math

All Students29%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)31%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English29%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant29%

Reading

All Students65%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)63%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English65%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant65%

Science

All Students47%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)44%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English47%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant47%

Writing

All Students59%
Femalen/a
Malen/a
Black (not Hispanic)n/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
American Indian or Alaskan Nativen/a
White (not Hispanic)56%
Free lunch eligiblen/a
Reduced lunch eligiblen/a
Not eligible for free/reduced price lunchn/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilitiesn/a
Limited English proficiency (LEP)n/a
Proficient in English59%
Immigrantn/a
Neither migrant nor immigrant59%
Scale: % proficient or advanced

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Colorado used the Transitional Colorado Assessment Program (TCAP) to test students' skills in reading, writing and mathematics in grades 3 through 10, and in science in grades 5, 8 and 10. The TCAP is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Colorado. The goal is for all students to score at or above proficient on the test. The TCAP replaced the CSAP as Colorado's state assessment program effective for the 2011-2012 school year.

The different student groups are identified by the Colorado Department of Education. If there are fewer than 16 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Colorado Department of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

23%
of schools in the state are Below average
52%
of schools in the state are Average
24%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in Colorado. Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Below Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 TCAP results from the state of Colorado.

2 This rating is based on 2011-12 and 2012-13 Median Growth Percentiles in Math, English Language Arts, and Writing from the state of Colorado.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 87% 56%
Hispanic 8% 32%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
Two or more races 1% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 1%
Black 0% 5%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 30%N/A41%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
College counselor(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
Speech and language therapist(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Latin
  • Spanish
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
Gender
  • Coed
Associations
  • Colorado League of Charter Schools

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Latin
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Audiovisual aids
  • College/career center
  • Internet access
  • Multi-purpose room ("cafegymatorium")
  • Music room
  • Performance stage
  • Playground
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
Girls sports
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Orchestra
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

School culture

Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Coach sports teams or extracurricular activities
  • Monitor the playground
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Serve on school improvement team or governance council
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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3835 14th Street SW
Loveland, CO 80537
Website: Click here

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