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GreatSchools Rating

Benjamin Jepson Magnet School

Public | PK-8 | 525 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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12 reviews of this school


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Posted November 15, 2013

My son started pre-k 4 this fall & I have no complaints at all. Maybe the people who have been complaining in these reviews should seek to reeducate themselves & learn grammer and spelling before they write a bad review which makes them look ignorant. Seems these parents are sour perhaps because the teachers at Jepson told them they will have to actually work with their kids at home in addition to school. Perhaps they were told by the principal they need to work on their parenting skills before blaming the school for their misbehaved child. Just a thought....Jepson is great and the principal is amazing!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2013

Reposting, in response to the parent who is suggesting that parents complaining have not been proactive. On the contrary, I met with a number of school officials and set up additional teacher/parent meetings as did my spouse in efforts to get our child the academic challenges we felt appropriate. Simply stated, this is a great school for average kids. Those who fall above or below grade-level benchmarks are harder to serve in this setting. At the end of our second year, we did decide to pull our children out and we are happily homeschooling them both. It is a much better fit for us as we continue to be actively involved (and proactively involved) in our children's education. AGAIN, I have only the best things to say about Ms. Sylvia's PK4 classroom, and my child who "graduated" from her class last year is now doing SECOND grade level work having already finished her K work over the summer and her 1st grade level work this month. Her program of preparing the children to read is so successful, I can only imagine how hard it would be for the kids coming into K with no preschool to keep up with Ms. Sylvia's kids; mine is reading 2nd grade chapter books now!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2013

Parents who complain about this school likely expect that the school is going to do everything for their child and they can sit back and not lift a finger.I have always found that that principals and teachers are easily available and proactive in my children's education and experience at Jepson. School is what YOU make of it, and if you don't make an effort, then likely you won't have a good experience.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 14, 2013

Benjamin jepson has been a HORRIBLE school for my children, my son is now attennding Edgewood Magnet School ! He LOVES it there. BJ has LOTS of bullys, rude, unkind Parents, teachers, and principals, such as davis, BJ multi-age system is horrible ! Studend are 13 in the 5th grade and my son had to stay in 5th grade TWICE! I do not, NOT ! recamend this school ! Its just like WEXLERGRANT ! his Second old school ! Do not send your kid HERE AT BJ'S!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2013

I have been at this school for 7 years. My daughter is in 6th grade. I believe the new principal is great. She is very proactive. The "new" rules are for safety. I for one don't mind waiting in a line to pick up my child if it means she is safe. The academic standards are much higher. I feel all the changes are for the better!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 10, 2012

the new principal is horrible! is anyone else having a problem with her and new rules?
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 7, 2010

I've been at this school for 11 years now, and I can't say anything bad about it at all. It helped me become the great young adult that I am now. I highly recommend this school!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 19, 2008

this school is brand new but it coould still need some chnges for example alot of kids say swear words and the teachers hear it and they even tell them to watch there mouth! and they coild at least just tell the kid that it is not appropite. but other than that the kids always fight there isnt a day that will go by peacfully. but the third floor princpal named lesli is a really good pricapl and so is the main princpal! and the science teacher tom is exellent and so is the math teacher maria and amy for language arts and the social studies teacher to tod!!!!and the libarian jeeane!!! now debbie the secratry is reall kind!!!!!
—Submitted by a student


Posted April 25, 2008

My children have gone to Jepson for the past 5 years. This is the best school for my daughter as she does not learn in the traditional manner that school is usually taught and since kindergarten the teachers she has had have worked very hard to find a way for her to learn and reach her potential. While some people would be turned off by the fact that everyone is on a first name basis, I find that this fosters a lot of respect between the faculty and students and students feel that is not only their school but their second family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 6, 2008

I am a graduate of jepson who has been there since kindergarten and i absolutely loved it! the teaching is excellent and the children, for the most part, are very well behaved. Of course like all schools, there will be the 'knuckle heads' but they are usually not in the same classroom with you. The size of the class is not too big which is good for learning purposses. Although they may not have sports teams, they have other academic-based programs which makes Jepson among the best schools in new haven. If you want your child to get a great education in the right environment with the diversity all schools should have, Jepson is the school for them. Yours Truly, A Well prepared for the future jepson graduate CLASS OF '05' !


Posted February 26, 2007

I totally disagree with the previous comment. My two sons have been at Jespon since pre-school. The children do not run the school! As far as using first names for the staff... The use of first names fosters mutual respect. Respect given, gets respect. If you choose to have your child in a classroom where they sit in rows, hands folded, working at a level that the entire class is...this isn't the school for you. Instead, open classes, reading nooks, hands on learning ...this is the Jepson I wanted for my sons. My boys haved thrived at this school, excelled in studies and have become caring, smart, well adjusted students. I would recommend Jepson Magnet to any parent seeking a wonderful start for their child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 17, 2005

The school has no structure at all. The kids seems like they run the school. Anytime you have students calling you by your first name that's no good and that's what this school does.It's not teaching the kids morals or respect.I made a big mistake sending my child to this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 67% in 2012.

51 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
45%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
33%

2009

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
35%

2010

 
 
32%

2009

 
 
38%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 63% in 2012.

55 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
26%

2009

 
 
54%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2012.

57 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
39%

2011

 
 
36%

2010

 
 
30%

2009

 
 
63%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 64% in 2012.

56 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
26%

2009

 
 
44%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 65% in 2012.

59 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
22%

2011

 
 
30%

2010

 
 
29%

2009

 
 
61%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 72% in 2012.

43 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
41%

2009

 
 
67%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 68% in 2012.

38 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
34%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
34%

2009

 
 
63%
Science

The state average for Science was 64% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
31%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
24%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 68% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
31%

2010

 
 
33%

2009

 
 
76%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 70% in 2012.

47 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
30%

2011

 
 
42%

2010

 
 
61%

2009

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 74% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
65%

2009

 
 
58%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 67% in 2012.

52 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
35%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
66%

2009

 
 
64%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 68% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
52%

2010

 
 
38%

2009

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 80% in 2012.

45 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
64%

2009

 
 
58%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 66% in 2012.

49 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
37%

2011

 
 
38%

2010

 
 
29%

2009

 
 
47%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 67% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
38%

2009

 
 
51%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 77% in 2012.

46 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
43%

2009

 
 
64%
Science

The state average for Science was 62% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
33%

2011

 
 
29%

2010

 
 
18%
Writing

The state average for Writing was 68% in 2012.

48 students were tested at this school in 2012.

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
37%

2010

 
 
34%

2009

 
 
73%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

All Students45%
Female48%
Male43%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic42%
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged36%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English46%

Reading

All Students38%
Female55%
Male25%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic35%
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English38%

Writing

All Students31%
Female50%
Male18%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic29%
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged23%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities40%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English33%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

The different student groups are identified by the Connecticut Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

All Students39%
Female42%
Male36%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic25%
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged32%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English42%

Reading

All Students30%
Female39%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic18%
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities32%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English33%

Writing

All Students22%
Female33%
Male13%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic12%
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged19%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities25%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English24%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

The different student groups are identified by the Connecticut Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

All Students40%
Femalen/a
Male42%
Black40%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English43%

Reading

All Students34%
Femalen/a
Male33%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged22%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities32%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English36%

Science

All Students31%
Femalen/a
Male27%
Black24%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged21%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities34%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English34%

Writing

All Students40%
Femalen/a
Male31%
Black33%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged35%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities47%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English44%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

The different student groups are identified by the Connecticut Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

All Students30%
Femalen/a
Male25%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic15%
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged26%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities31%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English33%

Reading

All Students59%
Femalen/a
Male56%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged55%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities58%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English64%

Writing

All Students35%
Female48%
Male26%
Black30%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanic33%
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged27%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities40%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English36%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

The different student groups are identified by the Connecticut Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

All Students38%
Female37%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged31%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities41%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English39%

Reading

All Students71%
Female78%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged67%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English73%

Writing

All Students37%
Female55%
Male10%
Blackn/a
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged41%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities43%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English38%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

The different student groups are identified by the Connecticut Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female58%
Male41%
Black24%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged46%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities50%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English50%

Reading

All Students70%
Female75%
Male64%
Black57%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged69%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English73%

Science

All Students33%
Female24%
Male43%
Black18%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged30%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities35%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English35%

Writing

All Students63%
Female64%
Male61%
Black46%
Asian Americann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Whiten/a
Economically disadvantaged51%
Not economically disadvantagedn/a
Students with disabilitiesn/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Proficient in English65%
Scale: % level 4 or 5

About the tests


In 2011-2012 Connecticut used the Connecticut Mastery Test (CMT) to test students' skills in reading, writing and math in grades 3 through 8, and in science in grades 5 and 8. The CMT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Connecticut.
Beginning in the 2009-2010 school year, the Connecticut Department of Education implemented new definitions of what it means to be proficient on the CMT test. The new standards for proficiency are higher than in previous years and the percent of students earning a proficient score is expected to be lower as a result of this change.

The different student groups are identified by the Connecticut Department of Education. If there are fewer than 10 students in a particular group, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Connecticut Department of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 36% 19%
Black 35% 13%
White 29% 62%
Asian 1% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 1%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch program 71%N/A34%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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375 Quinnipiac Ave
New Haven, CT 06513
Website: Click here
Phone: (203) 946-6077

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