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How do you feel about a 14 yr. old getting 'M-rated' video games?


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RandEsMom December 12, 2008


My son wants a WWII video game. He has the first version which was rated T. The new one out is rated M and I'm not happy. He claims it's "just for more violence", but I'm not so sure...the soldiers swear during the playing of the game. My son is a mature 14 year old. I tend to be a follower of rules; if it says rated for not under 17, then I usually wouldn't even consider getting it for him. My husband doesn't agree. He says I have to let him grow up sometime. Does anyone know about the World At War games?

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maggie93215 December 16, 2008


laura1967, i am with you our kids have seen alot of things and you can't protect them from what they see and hear when they are not with you. It the values we teach them, it's the lessons they have learned thourgh the years, and it's the examples they have seen at home that help shape and form our children. Every once in a while a naughty word will slip out of my mouth and my 4 yr old will remind me to say oh cheese or something funny like that. So kids know what is right and wrong if they are taught.

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RandEsMom December 16, 2008


Thanks to all for your input. I didn't expect so many responses and I'm grateful. I have watched my sons play the WWII game my oldest owns and, except for the profanity (which I understand is appropriate if and when one is being attacked or is injured) I have taken the opportunity to talk about the fact that the game depicts a genuine war in our country's history. I wasn't aware it was planned that way or that the battles were actually historic.
I also want to say I'm sorry for the arguments over exposing our children to violence and the terrible facts of a war. My father fought in WWII and was sometimes quite graphic about things that happened. I'm not shielding my boys from how awful war is; they watch the news with me and are aware of the conflict and deaths occuring in Iraq. We talk about the loss and destruction and it's effect on so many innocent people.
I was concerned about nudity which was answered. Thankyou for that! I personally don't like excessive blood and gore, but know my boys aren't as bothered by it. If the game is historically correct....well that just stirs my "teacher blood"! I also received the (great) tip to rent it and see what it's like.
I have discussed violence on television and in movies with my two boys and they understand that what they observed on the screen is pure Hollywood; actions and events planned to keep an audience's interest. We even discuss some of the tricks producers and authors use to hold interest and suspend disbelief. I am firm (and quick to apply consequences ) on appropriate language. My two certainly hear worse at school and there are times when their dad blows his top and spouts a few choice words of his own. I just tell my boys to choose the language that fits their situation and surroundings. I'm always there for them to talk to if they're unsure of what is required of them.
I appreciate all of your responses. They've defininitely helped.

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carvell04 December 17, 2008


Here are the rating from an official site:

ESRB Rating Symbols
EC= EARLY CHILDHOOD
Titles rated EC (Early Childhood) have content that may be suitable for ages 3 and older. Contains no material that parents would find inappropriate.

E= EVERYONE
Titles rated E (Everyone) have content that may be suitable for ages 6 and older. Titles in this category may contain minimal cartoon, fantasy or mild violence and/or infrequent use of mild language.

E10+= EVERYONE 10+
Titles rated E10+ (Everyone 10 and older) have content that may be suitable for ages 10 and older. Titles in this category may contain more cartoon, fantasy or mild violence, mild language and/or minimal suggestive themes.

T= TEEN
Titles rated T (Teen) have content that may be suitable for ages 13 and older. Titles in this category may contain violence, suggestive themes, crude humor, minimal blood, simulated gambling, and/or infrequent use of strong language.

M= MATURE
Titles rated M (Mature) have content that may be suitable for persons ages 17 and older. Titles in this category may contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content and/or strong language.

AO= ADULTS ONLY
Titles rated AO (Adults Only) have content that should only be played by persons 18 years and older. Titles in this category may include prolonged scenes of intense violence and/or graphic sexual content and nudity.

RP= RATING PENDING
Titles listed as RP (Rating Pending) have been submitted to the ESRB and are awaiting final rating. (This symbol appears only in advertising prior to a game's release.)

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Child_Of_Ra December 17, 2008


Thank you, carvell04 for posting those. I was going to just mention that the previous post was incorrect, that M was for Mature, but you have given a lot more information - very valuable information indeed, especially for the parents here who are not fully informed about the gaming world and the ratings that are a part of it.

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ihasanswer December 18, 2008


i think it shouldn't be any problem, im 14 and i have the game, it really is no big deal unless your son is very impressionable

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dandielyon5 December 18, 2008


I dont. But I do know that seems to be a common response from fathers about their sons. Because they did not like to be "babied" and they dont want their son to be "babied" too. I think it comes from their own insecurities about what makes a "man". However a 14 year old, no matter how mature is not a man. I feel the child's role is to test bounderies. And I also feel the parents role is to remind them consistently where those boundaries are. Basically, a child's brain is not developmentally prepared to deal with adult information yet. Good Luck.

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odachimaster December 19, 2008


depending in what decade you grew up in you can tell when your parents decade they grew up in mine was the 50/60/70 era which meant my parents were 20/30/40 as children/young adults as I was the same with parents of that generation children were to be seen and not heard when a parent asked for you to do something (you ask how high do I jump) but as a teen in the 60's you not only tested your parents you tested the whole system of the USA It was crazy. if the least of my problems is deciding whether my child should play a M rate video game thank you Lord. as in the 60/70 you just hoped you did not get killed while in school. We are in a time that is similar to those 60/70 and it is going to be difficult to explain to your 14 year old why is War still raging on in foreign countries ? is the draft coming back? Today we mostly have fire drills. We had nuclear drills (like it would really matter) but there was no information age then. Today with all the outside influences a child/teen is bombarded with all kinds of pressures and the visuals are outrageous these kids have enough on their plates let alone all the boundaries we put on them and yes I agree with boundaries but with the thought they can be discussed. if my children grow up with a sense of treating people the way they would want to be treated and a reasonable work ethic a sense of responsibility carries that through and have self-worth and lots of fun. I am a very Blessed Father
I not sorry for the speech. Do not trust me just check out what a 14 year old knows. Your son knows your a great parent just by being concern about whether or not he is age appropriate for the game sit down and discuss it is awesome how impress you we be about your son.
There is so much change coming our way. It is just an Iceberg at this time. I do not believe in worrying as I am older. but some of the newer parents keep your spirits high but on some of the small stuff let it go and use your energy on the bigger stuff. Pace yourself do not forget you have a Life as well

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carvell04 December 19, 2008


Unfortunately, we have more than just fire drills at school today. Due to Columbine and other acts of violence we also have "Lock Down" drills. I understand that a 14 year old knows a great deal about the world, but as parents we need to make sure we subject our children to age appropriate violence. I am not gearing the statement I am about to make towards ANYONE on this site, but I think there are a lot of parents that don't care what their children do and some of those children end up making b@mbs in their garage or bringing a gun to school. Just because my child knows there is gory blood and violence from war, does not mean he needs to play it in a game. My son also knows everything about sex, but I don't allow him to watch p@rn.

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curlysue December 19, 2008


I still feel its not appropriate

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carvell04 December 19, 2008


Unfortunately, we have a lot more than fire drills in schools today. Due to Columbine and other acts of violence, we also have "Lock Down" drills. I understand that a 14 year old knows a lot about the world, but as parents we need to subject our children to age appropriate violence. I am NOT gearing the statement I am about to make towards ANYONE on this site, but I think there are a lot of parents that do not care what their children do, and some of those kids end up making b@mbs in the garage or bringing a gun to school. Just because a 14 year old understands that war, consist of violent gory blood, does not mean he needs to act it out in a game. My son knows everything about sex, but I do not allow him to watch p@rn.



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