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GreatSchools Rating

Sam Rotolo Middle School

Public | 6-8

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

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19 reviews of this school


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Posted February 9, 2014

Every child with attention issues or organizational and processing issues are left to fall through the cracks at this school. The teachers do not respect the needs of such kids, nor do they respect how the disorders impact a child. Such kids are treated like semi-intelligent, inferior students and not given equal time or respect as their non-disabled peers. They coral all the same kind of kids into a couple of groups and provide one-size-fits-all accommodations, solely to make things easier on the administration and teachers; that provides the wrong learning environment, and worsens the already negative self-image most of these kids have. Many teachers spend more time on cya rather than making the extra time some of these kids would thrive on. So many kids leave without the foundational skills and strengths they need for HS, and experience unnecessary difficulties once there. These kids had ability and potential & could have performed as well as their non-disabled peers if given the proper support. Instead, this school takes the position that they will never be as good and if those kids just meet state standards, then they are right where they should be. So very sad.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2014

This school is fantastic! When I was in 1-5th grade I was having a terrible time. But, when I got to Rotolo I was and am so happy! I love it at Rotolo! The food is good, the teachers are so kind, and the learning experience is life changing. There is not a dull moment at Rotolo. I've made some of the most amazing friends here, and I have really been learning a lot more then when I was in 5th grade. I just really enjoy Rotolo middle school


Posted November 22, 2013

The Office for Civil Rights in Chicago would like to hear about accommodations not being followed. I had three children go through Rotolo. The oldest, who was in counseling by 8th grade, was told he was not honors material at High School transition (without explanation). The middle child's reading comprehension regressed at Rotolo and is many years below grade level. The youngest child tested into Algebra I in 6th grade at Northwestern U., but was deemed unfit for challenge Math because MAP scores weren't high enough! Go private, or get in front of the school board to voice concerns.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 20, 2013

Our school is very incompetent. The teachers do not follow accommodations on a consistent basis, if at all, and they are not held accountable. If they disagree with the accommodation or the diagnosis, they let the child fend for themselves. The teachers know they still get to keep their job, and there will be no real consequence for not cooperating with the parents. The teachers blame the Administration. The Administration blames the teacher's union. The child gets hurt in the mix. The teachers do not make the efforts to look after those students who need extra help on a weekly basis. They do not make it easy to provide one on one time before or after school. Many teachers embarrass or belittle the student if it's an attention disability. Children with ADHD at this school enter high school with a low self-esteem and permanently convinced they are not as smart as their peers and never will be. They always feel like they can't measure up.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 10, 2013

Rotolo middle school is a great school and does a great job at acclimating the 6th graders.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2011

This school is amazing. I can't believe how lucky I am to go here. My friends are amazing, the teachers are fun and really motivate you to go furthur into your work. Math is not one of my best subjects, but with the help of my 6th grade math teacher, Mrs. Snell, I have been able to get a really good grade in it! I can't wait for 7th grade this year.


Posted February 18, 2011

Worst school I've ever seen. The kids are horrible, rude, and morbid to eachother. Going there made me not want to live for a while. I was hospitalized for a while because of an other student. Bullying is out of control.


Posted January 24, 2011

The teachers I have come across at RMS have gone out of their way to help my daughter, offering before school tutoring, lunch-time homework club and lots of email communication to me when work hasn't been handed in on time or is incomplete. RMS is a big middle school with all the advantages that come along with it, including lots of elective subjects and after-school clubs. However, by having separate wings for each grade, and then splitting each grade into smaller teams, the students & parents benefit from the personal touch of a smaller school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 12, 2010

Rotolo Middle School formerly Batavia Middle School does not have a safe, encouraging or kind atmosphere. That perpetuates within the student population as the kids tend to be mean, judgmental, and verbally abusive in the worst way. This school is a great grooming facility for future bullies. Some of the teachers are really good, but some are sub-standard.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2010

I love this school I went here for 3 years and loved every year of it. The teachers are great and everyone is so kind there.
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 29, 2009

i go to this school and it is awesome great teachers and fun classes!
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 28, 2009

I had a terrible experience when I went to Rotolo, formerly Batavia Middle School. The people I went to school with were awful, judgmental, status-oriented, and just plain mean--and I was the brunt of it. The teachers? Some were laughable, others were okay. There was a definite lack of structure and challenge in a lot of my classes, which I needed as a pre-teen. I'm surprised that I even got into Rosary, because I was severely lacking in my writing, analytical, mathematical, and scientific skills. Honestly, Rosary helped me more than BMS--excuse me--RMS ever did.
—Submitted by a student


Posted February 1, 2008

Rotolo has helped alot understanding my toughest subjects in school, Math and science. I love my Advisroy teacher Mrs. Geisen and my Lit. and Social Studies teacher, Mrs. S. I think it's great having gym every day, it 's really good for you . I have lots of friends, and if one happens to be mean to me, i can always talk it out to our really nice 6th Grade consilor , Mrs. Neice. I think Rotlo is a great place for a 6th Grader to go to, after school activities are fun and educational.
—Submitted by a student


Posted October 30, 2007

This is my daughter's first year at Rotolo. She's a sensitive kid, but she loves the school and had zero problems adjusting. Rotolo does a good job of keeping 6th graders separated from the older kids.Teachers seem mostly satisfactory and the new principal seems involved, qualified and approachable. Still getting to know teachers, but it seems to be a parent consensus that Mr. Meyers is really an exceptional drama teacher (above and beyond, with a great personality) and every kid, including mine seems to love that class--even if they aren't into drama. Math is going well and science/history with Miss Statler is a favorite. She's truly nice to the kids, connects with them and has great educational pets in-room like cool lizards. One bummer is the health class.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2007

My son was having trouble in a couple of his classes last year and it was tough for him until this year that Mr. O'Reily has had him in his class and let me tell my son has become more responsible and of an organizer and Mr. O'Reily has taken the time help in all of the areas he has needed and his grades have changed drastically for the better. I am very happy Sam Rotollo school
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2006

Great athletic opportunities for the students. Helpful and enthusiastic staff.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 20, 2005

I love Rotolo! It is probably one of the best middle schools in Illinois! First of all, academics are great! All the teachers have knowledge of the subject matter and can communicate it well. The Algebra program (starting in 6th grade) with Mrs. Swider is fantastically put together. Mrs. Dicke is a phenomenal Social Studies teacher and Mrs. Karas is a splendid Language Arts/Literature teacher. There are a lot of after-school clubs such as art club, Builder's Club, Game Club, Book Club, the Yearbook... and countless others. Parent involvement isn't very high, very low as a matter of fact. The music program here is remarkable, especially the husband/wife team of the Ozsvaths. This school has been a blessing and has really expanded my academic growth! I have learned so much in seventh grade!
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 12, 2004

My daughter attended RMS. Her Literature/Language Arts teachers were outstanding and had great personal dedication to teaching. In the areas of Math and Science, subjects which were a challenge for her, she did not receive the same level of personal concern from teachers. There were many opportunities for success in Music,Speech,Drama,Communications, and Foreign Language.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 9, 2004

It's given me a lot of opportunities and though I didn't get along with some of my teachers there were others that hosted study halls and tried to motivate me to do my best by doing extra things for them! I love this school!
—Submitted by a student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
93%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
93%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
80%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
96%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students74%
Female72%
Male75%
Black41%
Asian73%
Hispanic50%
Multiracial80%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White78%
Low income46%
Non-low income78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)29%
Students without disabilities78%
English language learners25%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female76%
Male71%
Black47%
Asian67%
Hispanic54%
Multiracial93%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White76%
Low income48%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)22%
Students without disabilities79%
English language learners8%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female76%
Male76%
Black31%
Asian83%
Hispanic51%
Multiracial94%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income35%
Non-low income80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students78%
Female81%
Male76%
Black38%
Asian72%
Hispanic54%
Multiracial81%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White83%
Low income48%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)31%
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students91%
Female91%
Male91%
Black63%
Asian100%
Hispanic77%
Multiracial93%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income67%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)45%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students80%
Female82%
Male79%
Black54%
Asian100%
Hispanic49%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White84%
Low income51%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)28%
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female81%
Male72%
Black43%
Asian83%
Hispanic51%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income43%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)22%
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 83% 51%
Hispanic 8% 24%
Black 4% 18%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
Two or more races 2% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1501 South Raddant Road
Batavia, IL 60510
Phone: (630) 937-8700

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