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Coonley Elementary School

Public | PK-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 8 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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34 reviews of this school


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Posted May 20, 2014

Simply said this is a amazing school. Mr. Z is a great principal and there is a high level of parent involvement. The only downside is space or lack thereof which will be rectified when the addition is completed in Sept 2014.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2014

So pleased we bought a home in this neighborhood!!! Coonley has an amazing community filled with parents who are very involved and kids who want to learn. We are very lucky to have Mr. Z [rincipal] and Mr. Laslo [vice principal] as part of Coonley - they work so diligently to create an excellent learning environment. It was hard to obtain a house in the area, because it is so sought after, but it was well worth the wait.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 11, 2013

Don't believe the hype! Coonley has a lot of resources the neighborhood has become very affluent so it lacks diversity The teachers are excellent. But the community is not supportive or friendly.I was in a meeting with teacher,principle, and parents,the main concern was that the special needs kids and that they these kids were ruining their child's educucation?No acknowledgement of the contribution these kids made or empathy and acceptance learned. I will not include the derogatory adjectives.The principle said nothing to even convince these parents of the value of diversity, instead he listened and went along with their biggotry.I witnessed a parents berating poor kids because they needed breakfast.The venom directed at any type of program for needy children was alarming.The bullying is appalling no violence, children ganging up to make sure no one will talk to him today!No bruises but the psychological wounds last a lifetime.Coonley has a lot of bells and whistles but are material things like Interactive whiteboards in every classroom necessary?Emotional support acceptance and fairness are not. It is unfortunate.I guess ownership and pride are synonymous with exclusion.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 19, 2013

Most of the teachers at Coonley are good educators. I am concerned about the leadership at Coonley. The principal runs it more like a business than what is best for the children. There is a strong emphasis on having more money. Which is great but I think having more money and using it wisely is more important. For example don't get rid of perfectly good computers and waste more money on new ipads, (10,000+) just incorporate the existing computers in classrooms and put them to better use when educating the students, especially when you need to raise something like 13million dollars to expand the school. This is a school with options kids, neighborhood kids and special needs kids. However, there is a lot of coddling with the options students. It's great they are so smart, but remember there is a neighborhood program and a special needs program and I would think for a school so diverse they would split up the attention fairly and equally. If you go visit this school ask a lot of questions about your child's best interests make sure you get a honest answer, not a politically correct one. Stay out of the parent involvement if you don't want drama.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2012

I am a student at Coonley Elementary. I've been there since first grade and now I'm in eighth grade graduating. Throughtout the time I've been at Coonley I think its an excellent school. We dont have fights or any kind of violence/bullying. Many students are very friendly. Teachers make themselves avalible for students if any student needs help. We d not work ALL the time. Teachers try to make things fun & we have projects. We have many afte school programs and Coonley really tries to prep students for high school.


Posted September 25, 2012

I used to go to another school but I left there because the teachers and students were always harsh and stuck-up. This is my 5th year at Coonley and my last. All of the staff is very helpful and nice. They really care about what you think and your feelings.


Posted June 9, 2012

I am a student and I think this school is okay. But with the bullying going on the principal and vice principal always look the other way instead of finding ways to solve the discipline issues. People in the classes don't respect the teachers and other students. We are always taking tests instead of learning things that really matter. I think with the way this school is, it makes me frustrated - I don't feel like I am learning enough. I feel like all we do is take tests and I never remember all the information they throw at us. And the gifted kids judge the neighborhood kids - it is very frustrating and sad to see and hear this.


Posted May 30, 2012

What a great school where teachers and parents come together to improve the education our kids will receive. From the moment you walk into Coonley you can feel the energy that drives the kids, to excel at levels above standards. The principal has a knack for including, he is welcoming with strong goals towards challenging our children. I am very happy to be able to say that my child attend's Coonley.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2012

We are in our second year at Coonley and I have to say, I am thrilled with the education our son is getting. The teachers are excellent, creative, and passionate about their work and committed to the students. I absolutely love the principal. Earlier this year, my son was having some separation anxiety, and Mr. Z not only noticed, but took the time to talk to him and help him to feel better. My son loves him. He knows every student's name, and cares what the parents think. He is fantastic. I feel incredibly lucky to be part of this school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2012

my daughter is in the 1st grade options program at coonley and we a re very happy. coonley is a great community of parents and teachere led by Mr. Z. I cannot comment specifically on how Z interacts with the teachers, but he is on the playground every morning and knows the kids by name and seems to have a genuine concern for all the kids. I have seen Mr. Z sit in on a class for a while and he was sat right next to the students and engaged with them, and they were not at all afraid. We love Coonley and so does our daughter.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2012

Hi! We have been through 4 CPS schools and Coonley is the best by far. Is it perfect no but what CPS school is? What makes Coonley great is a combination of great parents, great teachers and great administration. I am very involved with Coonley and have met with and dealt with teachers and administration at length. I have found them very caring and also open to new ideas. As a parent you can not ask for more. Mr Z. and Mr. Lazlo work at least 12 hours a day and you will always see them walking around and helping people. For the reviewer who had issues with Mr. Z, that is an anomaly not the norm. We feel really lucky to be part of the Coonley community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 22, 2012

The community around coonley is very nice and most of the parents have been great to be around. The teachers are excellent and the gentrification of the area ensure that there are lots of resources. As a parent of a child in the options/gifted classes I have to agree that all they do is teach the kids a grade ahead and they pile on the homework. But he is learning well. I have spoken to more than one parent who is not pleased with the principle Mr. Z and his leadership style with the teachers leaves a lot to be desired not much of a partnership. Some have described him as tyrannical. My son is terrified of him luckily he has never had to meet him for disciplinary reasons. If we were in a better financial position I would certainly chose a different school but we are fine and our son is doing well. The school is doing so well because of the work the of the parents teachers and the leadership of the previous principal. Mr. Z sometimes seems more like a politician than a principal but as long as our son is doing well and treated well we won't make any waves.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2011

My daughter is first grade in the options program at Coonley. We have had such a great experience here from day one. From the teachers , super involved parents, to Principal Z and Mr. Lazlo, everyone makes us feel so at home , even though we are not from the neighborhood. Any concerns we have had as a group , the principal and teachers have worked out with us in such a positive way. I love this school simply because my daughter is so happy here. She tells me all the time . She has already made such great friends and I have connected with so many parents there from all walks of life, both in the options and neighborhood programs. Other than all wonderful things my daughter is learning and excited about , my favorite thing to do at Coonley (when the weather's nice:) is hang out after school in the beautiful playground / garden . The kids just play there and have such a great time , so naturally , like when I was a kid. What a great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2011

Coonley has been nothing but a positive experience since my son started in PK with Ms Nancy and Ms Paula and now will enter 3 rd grade(,neighbourhood program) .He had been accepted to a Gifted program outside Coonley but we declined because of our wonderful experience at Coonley and don't regret a minute of it .Every teacher he has encountered has been a great mentor for my son and proud to see they have brought him to a straight A Honor Roll ... Thank you Coonley and continue the great work
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2011

I've never seen a more committed, caring and highly motivated staff than what we have at Coonley. Mr. Z, is an amazing principal who has a wonderful bond with the kids, parents, staff and community We've found it to be an incredibly nurturing environment. Regarding the Options Progam, having been in the program since its inception (3 years now)--this is absolutely a program that is all about critical thinking and depth of learning. My child loves learning b/c of all she gets from Coonley. Also the after school programs are fantastic!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2011

When you compare Coonley to Chicago Public schools it is definitely far better. It is however, a public school where the classrooms are over crowded and the education is cookie cutter one size fits all and there is no room for outside the box behavior or thinking. The options program is not truly a gifted program where the children are taught critical thinking and in depth learning. It is merely accelerated where they throw large amounts of material at them to get them to be a grade or two ahead. The new principle can definitely get things done but I do not like his interaction with the children. My son did not find that he could fit in and the administration attempted to label him with all kinds of disabilities despite that thousands of dollars in psychological testing said he was absolutely normal. Just a little outside the box. He was severely punished for this and it has affected the outcome of this entire year. The teachers have so far been fabulous but the environment does punish anyone who isn't one of the masses. I wish our experience had been better and we tried but this place is not for us. We would rather a more progressive environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2010

Students are supported and have a positive environment where students are supported and have great experiences!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

The principal and vice principal are phenomenal, very dedicated and involved in the daily events with the students. It is an extremely supportive community or educators and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 16, 2010

Very active PTO and LSC and Friends of Coonley group. Wonderful administrative staff. Parents and neighbors volunteer when needed. My kid loves it there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 15, 2010

The options program is really a an accelerated reading and math program. There is science and social studies but the real emphasis is on reading and math. Not much critical thinking or differentiated instruction within the program. Just go, go, go. We were told the program was a 'what if' program, kids could problem solve and ask questions. I haven't seen this. The real emphasis is on pushing kids two grades ahead. No time for developing at your own rate or developing deep thinking. Is this really a gifted program?
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
87%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
74%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
93%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
96%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female81%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income65%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)40%
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students90%
Female89%
Male92%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income70%
Not low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)50%
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female85%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic82%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income80%
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)69%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students87%
Female90%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic78%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low income77%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)46%
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female98%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income100%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)69%
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female93%
Male85%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income82%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities91%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students85%
Female89%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income68%
Not low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female91%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income94%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students74%
Female91%
Male65%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic73%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income83%
Not low income62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female82%
Male91%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income88%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students82%
Female82%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income88%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students96%
Female91%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic93%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income94%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female82%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income81%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female82%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income81%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
1
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 53% 51%
Hispanic 34% 24%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 4% 4%
Black 2% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Photography
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Gregory Alan Zurawski

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Playground
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Photography
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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4046 North Leavitt Street
Chicago, IL 60618
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-5140

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