Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Hope Inst Learning Academy High School

Public | K-5 | 332 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 5 ratings
2013:
Based on 7 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

17 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted April 2, 2014

I have two children who attend HILA, 2nd grader and Kindergartner. Overall, I have been pleased with the school. My children have learned a lot and enjoy seeing their teachers and friends daily. Initially when I first started with HILA 3 years ago, I was skeptical at how the staff would be able to maintain a fun and safe space for the general population students while incorporating a few students who have special needs. But I must say, I have been thoroughly impressed by the integration process and it teaches all the children tolerance. The entire school staff seems to be trained on how to properly deal with disruptive behavior regardless of the child and it has been very rare that I've seen or heard my children mention unruly conduct. The school is clean and it feels safe. They seem to also really work hard at providing additional support for families via their parent resource center. There are however three things I'm hoping the school will improve on: (first) better parent involvement; (second) establish a music program in which the students will learn to play an instrument; (third) establish a program in which the children learn a foreign language.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2014

The school is wonderful and has turned around since its opening. The administration now is focused and serious in making this a top notch school. We have been with Hope since the beginning and have seen its ups and downs as with any new school. The school has improved tremendously within the last two years due to the newer principal and better staff. This is an especially good school for special needs as the staff is caring, communicative, and supportive. They will do their best in making it right for your child. My child loves Hope and I highly recommend it now.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 10, 2014

I have two children at The Hope Institute and I absolutely love this school. They have an excellent program; and the teachers and staff are extremely competent and very professional. My kids love the school as well! My kindergartener once described Hope Institute as "really cool!"
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2014

My child has started Kindergarten in 2012. We have been very pleased with her teacher from last year and this year. The administration is very helpful, and the new principal is great. I agree, HILA did have trouble in the past, but I've seen the new administration really step up and make some changes. Parents also cannot put all the blame on a school for low test scores. We need to be working with our children at home on a daily basis, assisting them, and staying involved. My son will start at HILA in the fall, and we are very excited for him to be able to attend, also. I would recommend HILA to another family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 8, 2014

Our child was with HILA since it first opened its doors and it was the biggest mistake we ever made. Now she is in 6th grade and her teacher has spent the first half of the school year working extra with her to catch her up to her peers as she is far behind in reading and mathematics despite good grades at HILA. Like other parents we gave this school opportunity after opportunity to change and were deceived by promise after promise which were broken. We saw good teachers walk out the door time and time again because of administration. The school has continued to have new 4th grade, 5th grade and Kindergarten teachers and things are so bad they cannot even keep a librarian. Do not make the same mistake we did, the schools abyssmal test scores do reflect the quality of education at Hope Institute Learning Academy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 29, 2013

My son is currently in 2nd grade and has attended Hope since kindergarten. He has significant learning disabilities and gets more support at Hope than he would at any other school in the city. His teachers truly care about him and push him to learn. We are very grateful for Hope.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 24, 2013

This school has a revolving door for leadership and teachers, causing chaos and among the lowest test scores in Illinois. Communication is horrible as the school refuses to communicate with parents in regards to failure to become a 6-8 grade school and dcfs and dhs investigations.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 18, 2013

This isn't a great school it's like a revolving door in regards to teachers. This is my son's first year in kindergartner and he has had 3 different teachers. During the first couple of weeks of school they had more students then teachers for kindergartner so they had to open a third classroom and my son was moved to the new class. After about 8 weeks the new teacher resigned and another teacher was placed in his classroom and as of today (11/18/13) he has yet another new teacher. I really had high hopes for this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 23, 2013

This year is the first time in three years that our son will not be starting the year at Hope. This is also the first year that we are not starting out the year with overwhelming concern that the school administration is acting in their own best interests and going out of there way to mislead parents into believing that everything is great. Beyond the image that Hope tries to create with a neverending stream of new computers, big fundraisers and donor dollars is a school that is chaotic, lacks stable leadership and consistently scores lower on academic testing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 12, 2013

I have two children returning back to this school and I feel like the school is good but needs improvement. When school starts back next week my children will be in 1st & 3rd grade. I have no problems with this school. The teachers that my children have had has been excellent. My Oldest son has been attending going on 4 year's. I love HILA!! :-)


Posted August 11, 2013

Glad to finally have my child on to a different school. Administration continually makes promises that they never intend to keep (i.e. 6th-8th grades). State test scores are among the lowest in the state and lowest in the city, perhaps because they can't seem to keep a 4th or 5th grade teacher employed for longer than a year. They claim inclusion in the classroom, but don't provide appropriate support to those classrooms, as a result classes are out of control, teachers spend all their time dealing with disruptive students which only hurts and holds back the majority of the classes.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2013

This school has successfully created an environment where it is cool to be disrespectful, disruptive, and unkind to other students. In fact, if you are bad enough, you will even get put on a special reward system where you get extra incentives and attention just for doing the minimum that is expected of you. And then the other students will see you, and imitate your behavior just to earn extra rewards too. There is no real discipline in place, and I have seen too many good students slip into bad habits because their achievement isn't recognized or encouraged. This school is acceptable for students with special needs, but if your child is well-behaved and high achieving, expect them to be bullied and overlooked.
—Submitted by a teacher


Posted September 8, 2012

As with many new schools, this school has had a few "kinks" to work out-most take at least 5 years to become established. They are definitely moving in the right direction now, especially with the new Principal and Asst. Principal, and I am confident this new leadership team will bring the improved test scores needed to expand in the future. This school has a fantastic curriculum, amazing teachers and tons of potential! My son is excited to go to school each day and loves LEARNING which should be the ultimate goal of any great school!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2012

For the second year in a row the school has failed to expand to sixth grade despite repeated promises. Three principals in three years. Test scores that are way below the rest of Chicago.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 21, 2011

This School is awful do not put your kid in here. The retention rate for teachers is deplorable., Most are inexperienced and low paid. I'll take the worst public school teacher any day.


Posted May 23, 2011

I have two children here, one special needs and the other general education. They are both excelling and like going to school every day. The administration is so attentive and teachers are great with communicating.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 28, 2011

My daughter has attended Hope Institute Learning Academy for the past two school years, and I must say that her father and I are pleased as punch with her academic progress. Our daughter is currently in the second grade, and she performing at grade level in certain subjects and above grade in others. The teachers, and administrative staff are encouraging, and they expect the very best performance from the HILA students each day. I must say that I am quite pleased with HILA, and I am looking forward to the 2011- 2012 school year.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
14%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
30%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
41%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
28%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
63%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
48%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
44%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
51%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students14%
Female15%
Male13%
Black11%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income12%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
Students without disabilities16%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students30%
Female42%
Male21%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income29%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities37%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students28%
Female38%
Male19%
Black27%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income30%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities41%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students36%
Female48%
Male27%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities53%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students64%
Female71%
Male58%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income65%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students17%
Female9%
Male21%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income17%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities18%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students33%
Female46%
Male26%
Black30%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income29%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities41%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 83% 18%
Hispanic 10% 24%
White 4% 51%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 1% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Michael Jakubowkis
Fax number
  • (773) 534-7623

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1628 West Washington Boulevard
Chicago, IL 60612
Website: Click here
Phone: (312) 355-0172

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools





Esperanza School
Chicago, IL



ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT