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GreatSchools Rating

Hawthorne Elementary Scholastic Academy

Public | K-8 | 566 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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61 reviews of this school


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Posted October 6, 2009

Just -- flat out -- an outstanding school with dedication and love from top to bottom: the principal and the teachers -- this is the way a good school should be run, we're very happy to have our son going to Hawthorne!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2009

We are thrilled to be at Hawthorne. The Kindergarten teachers are incredible, using the latest research to guide their reading and writing instruction. I still can't believe such a terrific school exists in the city of Chicago!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Great teachers, active parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 5, 2009

I am going to 8th grade, my final year at Hawthorne. It has been an amazing 8 years, the teachers care for you so much but they also make sure you stay focus and learn as much as possible. I am going to be truly sad when i leave for highschool but i am totally sure that Hawthorne will/has prepared me great for my future.
—Submitted by a student


Posted May 19, 2009

I have two children at Hawthorne, both in the upper grades now. We've been here since kindergarten and on the whole have been nothing but grateful to have gotten into such a fine school. The teachers are dedicated, and principal Anna Alvarado is an unusually dedicated, caring and inspired administrator. She is a proactive and creative leader. The school is rigorous, no doubt, you must be an advocate for your child. Sometimes the curriculum is a solid grade level above the norm. If you're a dedicated student, you will find many outlets here. As to parents, yes, some work, some don't. I work full time, but don't see the school or other parents as cliquish. As at any other school, there are many ways to be involved and the parent community is composed of all sorts of people who wish only the best for their children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2009

Great school, great kids, great teachers, and great principal
—Submitted by a student


Posted December 31, 2008

Thought they would be a good fit for our son. We were wrong. Too big of a class for one teacher and TA. Minimal individualized attention due to large class size. Breeding ground for behavioral problems. Sure, they care. But they only care for the kids that shine, right off the bat. Our son is a caring, enthusiatic, and age appropriate learner. He is curious and intelligent, and is learning to work with his peers-- isn't that what school is about? Just an aside. I appreciate the comment about the mothers who do not work that send their children here. While dropping off my kid, the school grounds looked like a sorority gathering-- very clique-ish, very high school-like. Not cool.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 19, 2008

Hawthorne Academy is one of the gems of the Chicago Public School system. We have one child already at Hawthorne entering 3rd grade. Our two other children will be attending this year entering K and 5th grade . Our daughter ( who skipped 1st grade) had a wonderful teacher last year in 2nd grade and we are very happy to have all of our children at Hawthorne this year. The school has a great staff, starting with the principal, Ms. Alvarado. Everyone we have met there is friendly and seems to actually like children, which was not the case at some of our previous schools. Unlike many urban schools, Hawthorne has a very open, welcoming feel to it that was evident to us from the first time we visited it. We are very lucky to have a school like Hawthorne in Chicago.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2008

My daughter is in the 8th grade at Hawthorne and she really hates the school. She especially hates the kids in her class. There isn't very much ethnicity in her class and her teachers aren't very good at communicating, or being helpful in any way. I would never recommend this school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2007

Hawthorne is a good school, but there are many good schools in the CPS system. The new principal is just as amazing in effectiveness, yet caring, as the previous one. Just a note of caution that many of the mothers do not work. Some teachers and mothers are not understanding of the time constraints of working mothers, which can cause a rift. My children are doing very well at this school. Hawthorne has wonderful music, art, computer and math teachers as well as the core elementary teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 31, 2007

I have my twin daughters at Hawthorne this year. They are both in 6th grade. My daughters had attended pre-k at Moos School and I was told that they were bright and that I should put them in a gifted kinder class. I didn't because the gifted school was to narrow minded and I want my children to be well rounded so I registered them at St. John Berchman School in Logan Square and felt that I wanted more... so, I applied to several CPS locations and Hawthorne contacted me and the girls were accepted. They have done extremely well academically and have a lot of friends. The academics are great. Teachers are great. Parents seem to work together. The information I gather from the LSC is wonderful and active. The principal doesn't seem to be a people person. It is her 1st year as a principal, perhaps its that.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 19, 2006

My daughter attended 3rd and 4th grade at Hawthorne. She loved this school, it's one of the best in Chicago. Daughter now attends a school in Naperville that doesn't match up to this school. Very good school, I should have let my daughter complete 8th grade here, Naperville schools aren't that great.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 5, 2006

I love this school, i am a student there and the teachers are concerned and love the students. Children are challenged and they promote harmony within the classroom.
—Submitted by a student


Posted November 2, 2005

Ok...I am impressed! Having two children with different learning styles, varying attributes and needs...Hawthorne is an amazing school that somehow successfully evaluates and applies methods to ensure that each and every child fully grasps the material they are receiving. I have had Hawthorne alum report Highschool as a breeze after leaving Hawthorne...they truly are prepared and then some upon leaving!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2005

I attended this school from k-8 and I am currently a freshman at the University of Misosuri- Columbia. Hawthorne really prepared more for one of the best high schools in Chicago. The academic programs are available in different levels of difficulty for the various backgrounds students come from. Hawthorne is very diverse. I always looked forward to international night at the end of every year. Art, music, sports, and cultural activities are always planned and made available to the students. Parents are very involved. They tag along for field trips, help with crafts that require more supervision, join PTA, run for office in the parent government, and help with school assemblies. I enjoyed my time at Hawthorne and go back on a regular basis to talk to old teachers.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted July 19, 2005

I have 2 children at Hawthorne, I am one of the parents that work very hard on fundrairsing. I don't give big checks I just give alot of time and it is very much appreciated by the whole staff. My children are getting a great education and we consider ourselves to be very lucky.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 7, 2005

The academic education my child received is first class although many of the projects have obviously been done by parents. The staff is wonderful, except for the ones that allow children to get away with many things because of who their parents are and how much (money or time) they contribute to the school. The principal has done wonderful things with the school, but could use help in making all parents welcomed (not just the ones who donate money or their time or are in the same social circles). The PTA is very active. The education is great, the school is just very cliquey. Students should be judged by what they accomplish academically, not who their parents are and the administration should make it a safe place (emotionally and socially) for all to learn and punish those that are bullies despite of how much their parents donate.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2004

Hawthorne is an excellent school. Its amazing teachers and principal, along with parent support, make it possible for all students to suceed. Hawthorne prepared me for high school so much more than I could have ever imagined. Thank you to the Hawthorne Family for a great education, love, and support that all students need!
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 11, 2004

I was a student at Hawthorne and two of my cousins are currently enrolled here. It is one of the best if not the best school out there. From the dissection classes to the amazing Mathathon, not to mention the great reading material. When I went to high school all my freshmen year was just a review of what I had learned. The teachers motivate you and always say something to make every student excel. I will never forget the teachers at Hawthorne, and the motivation they always gave me to be the best I could be. The principal always had a great smile and is an amazing leader. It's a safe school with great activities that not only help children stay away from being with the bad crowd but also challenges them intellectually. Thanks Hawthorne for helping me be the best I can be!
—Submitted by a student


Posted March 31, 2004

Great teachers and parents make this a wonderful school filled with curious students. There is an active PTA with several raising events. It's the only wireless public grade school in the state, as well having chess club, chorus, sports teams, and music lsson. While there is always room for improvement (smaller class size would be good), we have been very happy at Hawthorne.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
98%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
99%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
90%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students95%
Female93%
Male97%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female96%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low incomen/a
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students92%
Female89%
Male96%
Black80%
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White97%
Low income82%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female83%
Male89%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low income55%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students99%
Female97%
Male100%
Black100%
Asiann/a
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income91%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students90%
Female87%
Male94%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White96%
Low income75%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)100%
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female90%
Male82%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White88%
Low income65%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)70%
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students97%
Female100%
Male95%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income86%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students94%
Female100%
Male89%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income93%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female92%
Male96%
Black92%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income81%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)70%
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students92%
Female90%
Male96%
Black92%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income75%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)70%
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female95%
Male96%
Black92%
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracial100%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income88%
Non-low income98%
Students with disabilities (IEP)80%
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female83%
Male94%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income69%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students89%
Female90%
Male89%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanic86%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White96%
Low income62%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 47% 51%
Hispanic 23% 24%
Black 12% 18%
Two or more races 8% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 5% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 2% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 2% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Mr. Nathan J Pietrini

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Playground
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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3319 North Clifton Avenue
Chicago, IL 60657
Phone: (773) 534-5550

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