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GreatSchools Rating

Jackson A Elementary Language Academy

Public | K-8 | 554 students

 
 

Last modified
Community Rating

5 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 8 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

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49 reviews of this school


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Posted August 16, 2013

Andrew Jackson is a great school and I could not be happier with my child's development. I wish the rest of the world had this kind of diversity, kindness and dedication.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 31, 2012

So, to the real estate broker who said that moving near AJ doesn't help your chances, even if you're 1.5 miles away. I read where there was a different lottery for kids within 1.5 miles - are you saying that's incorrect. I'm just asking because we are just starting to look where to move in Chicago for next school year (2013-14) and just want to get a handle on all of this...thanks.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2012

This school has done wonders for my daughter! I was always on the look out for a great school for my children and that is exactly what I've found in this school. From principal all the way to the lunch staff , they keep these kids well rounded and completely grounded. Its excellent. The parents are great also. I work crazy hours so I'm not able to be as involved as I want but they always make you feel welcomed and included. Best school ever .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 7, 2012

Great School, Great Teachers, Great Leadership. They have their act together. Parents are the best here. I mean its WOW!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2012

Dear Parent, I am a real estate broker and a mother of two who also lives in the area and would like to inform you that living in the area does not provide you with instant access to AJ because it is not considered a neighborhood school. Therefore, please be careful if promises or statements have been made to you during your home buying search or purchase as to the likelihood of acceptance at AJ will be based on lottery.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 14, 2012

Does anybody know what are your chances of getting accepted if you live in the neighborhood (less than 1.5 mi away?). We are buying a house around the school and are looking forward to having our son attend, but I am worried about this lottery system even for neighborhood kids. Any opinions would be appreciated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 10, 2012

Been at ajla for 6 years as a parent. I have to say I am very happy with the teachers and principal. The principal is fair and understands children and is very supportive both to parents and students alike. Communication with teachers is not a problem. My guess parents that don't like the principal because he is fair and runs a tight ship and the parent didn't get snobby way. If there is anything wrong is a few high strung Parents that want their way and when the don't get it the complain.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 9, 2012

Fnally a parent speaks the truth about AJLA. I having been waiting for this review. You speak the truth as to what really goes on beyond the black picket fence. Your opinion Feb 1st Parent is much appreciated.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 1, 2012

I attended AJLA from 1997 - 2002. The ethnic diversity at the school provided me with the true meaning of a well rounded education. The faculty and staff always went the extra mile for us. Teachers truly cared about our education and ensured that we would be well prepared for high school. Because of AJLA, I excelled at Whitney Young High School and now a proud alumna of UCLA. Educators at AJLA understand that the foundation of a good education starts at a very young age. The importance of taking copious notes in class was first introduced to me in the 7th grade, and to this day (as a law student) I am still going back to the basics of what I learned when I was 13! I couldn't have gone this far without AJLA being there for the primal years of my educational career!


Posted May 29, 2011

Teachers, Principal, Parents involvement all outstanding. I have two kids at AJLA. one upper grade, one lower grade could not be more pleased with the whole school staff and the education they are getting. Again just outstanding.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2011

This is school the bees knees. The teachers are very attentive to the students needs. The administration is also top notch. They always look at the children 1st before the make any decision. Parent involvement is 2nd to none. One just has to walk into the school and see parents that are willing to help at anytime. The principal is in constant communication with parents. Kids are very happy and excited going to school each morning. AJLA is building them a solid foundation for many years to come.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 27, 2011

The principal has an impressive knowledge of each student, down to his/her reading tastes. The teachers and building staff are dedicated and generous.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2011

AJLA provides a solid education so if that's all that matters, this is your school. The principal who in 2007 inherited a superior operation has a stand-off ish "too busy" kind of attitude. The relations between many parents and the principal and teachers is confrontational. It's become SOP, very stressful. In the upper grades, support is lacking. It's all about maintaining rank at this school. Sad to say about such a good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2011

I strongly agree with the parent who posted today, May 26, 2011. It s a very true assessment of the leadership in the school today. Support is definitely lacking in the upper grades from the teachers as well as the principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 8, 2010

This school is a parent's dream. The parent involvement is excellent. The principal communicates with the parents regularly. The teachers excel in their areas of expertise. I highly recommend this school to anyone in Chicago.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 19, 2010

It provides phenomenal leadership within the school. The teachers provide excellent instruction. They have the most advanced language program offered nationwide. The cross cultural experience provides a true reflection of our global society. It is a well direct public school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2010

I Love Andrew Jackson Language Academy because of the school's diversity, sponsered learning activities after school and wonderful teaching staff.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2010

they are on top of things!they have a clue!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 12, 2010

There are so many reasons for which I love this school. Let me start by saying that the teachers in this school are the best. They will go out of their way to make sure you are informed and kept in the loop when it comes to your child's progress. This gives the parents a chance to help their children improve on areas that are needed and are also given the tools to do so by our great and caring teachers. Diversity is also one of the reasons why I love this school. My children have learned about so many cultures and traditions from the friendships they have developed over the years. Not only are they learning the importance of socializing but also the languages that they are exposed to gives them a sense of curiosity with other parts of the world that they would otherwise not have. Our faculty, staff, parents and students are always looking for ways to make our school better and give back to the community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 10, 2010

We at Jackson are consistently looking for ways to improve the educational and social experience for students, staff, faculty and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
97%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
95%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
94%

2012

 
 
99%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
99%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
97%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
95%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students84%
Female77%
Male93%
Black50%
Asian100%
Hispanic93%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income62%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students95%
Female91%
Male100%
Black93%
Asian100%
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income95%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students91%
Female84%
Male97%
Black78%
Asian100%
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income82%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female87%
Male94%
Black89%
Asian100%
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income86%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female90%
Male100%
Black89%
Asian100%
Hispanic92%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income96%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students83%
Female89%
Male74%
Black57%
Asian100%
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income87%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female87%
Male74%
Black50%
Asian92%
Hispanic79%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income73%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students94%
Female90%
Male97%
Black70%
Asian100%
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income96%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female80%
Male100%
Black60%
Asian100%
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income88%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students89%
Female88%
Male92%
Black75%
Asian100%
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income92%
Non-low income87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students91%
Female93%
Male88%
Black69%
Asian100%
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income85%
Non-low income95%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students95%
Female95%
Male96%
Black88%
Asian100%
Hispanic95%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income92%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female90%
Male80%
Black75%
Asian100%
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income80%
Non-low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female87%
Male65%
Black53%
Asian100%
Hispanic62%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income69%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Asian 25% 4%
Hispanic 25% 23%
White 25% 51%
Black 20% 18%
Two or more races 3% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

This school has not yet provided program information.


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1340 West Harrison Street
Chicago, IL 60607
Phone: (773) 534-7000

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