Advertisement
Advertisement

GreatSchools Rating

Lozano Elementary Bilingual & Intl Center

Public | PK-8 | 314 students

 

Be sure to visit

Take along one of
our checklists:

 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

Rate this school

Click on stars to rate
Please select a star rating for this school.
    Helpful reviews answer questions:
  • What do you think others should know?
  • What do you like?
  • How could your school improve?
    Review Guidelines
    GreatSchools won’t post reviews that contain:
  • Inappropriate language
  • Allegations of criminal conduct
  • Names of students, teachers or staff
1200 characters remaining
Please read and accept our Terms of Use to join GreatSchools.
Please indicate your relationship to the school.
Registration is required to post your anonymous review
We will not display your name, photo or email address with your review.
OR
Your email address will never be published or shared.
Indicates a required field

13 reviews of this school


Sort by:
Show reviews by:
Posted May 2, 2013

This is an update from my last review. My daughter is currently enrolled at Lozano school. The teachers and aids are very friendly. They contact me for any issue with my child. At first this was kind of stressful for me because I was in the middle of working on placing my 3 year old in school and have another toddler at home as well as an 8 year old also in school. I'm not 100% sure just yet if this is the best placement for my daughter. She has a lot of special needs. Her behavior has gotten worse since she started school but that has happened before. The counselor ms. Aracely Montoya has been very helpful to my daughter and I. She is helping me find the resources that my child needs. I do not blame the staff they all do the best they can and are allowed to do. I wish that the board of Ed would be more helpful in helping children's with disabilities. We will see in the next few months what has been accomplished.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 18, 2012

I will fight to have my son attend another school next year. He has autism and had been reading at his other school and reads at home. He is otherwise not verbal (communication-wise). His teacher has told me that he can't read so they don't want to push him. He's also having more tantrums than he's had before and he's banned from taking any more school trips (even with a parent). At another school at aged three he received homework at least twice a week. It's almost the end of the school year and he hasn't had homework even ONCE. To top that off, his speech therapist has been absent from EVERY IEP meeting he's had this year. When he has a tantrum, I'm called and told that they will call the police on me if I don't come and get him, as if I'm just a negligent parent. They're going to have to fight me to get him into this same school again. ALSO, CPS will NOT help you find a school that's best for your son. Last year my son didn't attend school for almost two months because it was MY responsibility to find a a school that even accepted autistic children, and when you call the neighborhood school they have NO IDEA which schools even accept autistic children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2011

People should stop complaining about Lozano. It seems to me IRONIC that the parent's are complaining about the school being behind academically, yet those same parents who complain can't even spell. The problem is the students and parents. Instead of complaining parents should DO something and don't expect the school to be perfect. -Former student and sophomore at NSCP.


Posted June 10, 2010

This school is so behind. They don't even have a nurse on staff. The school is very focused on Latin America cult and beliefs and very religious for a public school. The teachers do not speak very good english. The principal is like a ghost! I feel he is unqualified for the job. Parent involvement is never asked or wanted. They keep passing my child and I see he is not doing well. Now I have to move to get my child out of this school/the school district. I like my house, but I love my son... the choice is easy.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 28, 2009

We had a very frustrating first year at this school. The professional staff is very uncooperative and rude making it hard to get appropriate information. The teachers are nice but they are very hard to get a hold of when we have concerns and little is sent home regarding the progress of the students. When we visit the school the children are loud and disruptive. We are frustrated with the homework as it is way below our son's academic level. Also, we feel that time before school could be better spent with children playing and socializing as opposed to the movies they watch in the auditorium.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2008

My name is Juan Martinez and I went to this school! And i am proof that there is nothing really wrong with the school, it's the children, more specifically the parents. I am currently a sophomore at Walter Payton high school, the 2nd best high school in Illinois! I owe this accomplishment to all my teachers, staff but mostly my parents. It's true, the school isn't so advanced academically, but the reason why Lozano isn't such a 'good' school is because the school is a bilingual school, so many non-english speaking students come in, with little to no english experience, and it slows the class, a little. The school DOES have a Spanish class, which is pretty fun; and provide ESL for non-english speaking students during English class. I think these parents should stop complaining, and become more involved with their children's education. -Juan/proud lozano student
—Submitted by a student


Posted August 27, 2007

Overall, good school. Staff are interested and care about the students. Great assemblies and family activities. I agree about meetings during the day - difficult for working parents. My students receive tons of homework. English errors are common on notes sent home, from office and teachers. But the positives outweigh negatives in most cases. My kids have been happy at Lozano.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 4, 2007

The education my child has gotten from the school is good. By the time she left Kinder she was reading. The after-school program are good and beneficial. Despite the other comments, most of the teachers there have masters degree. Yes it has its problems, but it is not a perfect world!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2005

While this school certainly does have its problems, they have 3pre-K and 2 Headstart classrooms. The fact is that the bilingual ed really does not exist at this school. In prek children are taught to count and say the alaphabet in Spanish and in English. That is about the extent of the bilingual program through K. My son came home with a report card that had a grade for spanish-but the children never had SSL instruction. Parents are expected to attend meetings during the school day. Working parents cannot attend meetings and be involved. This school needs and administration and a local school council overhaul. Local parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 19, 2005

This school exemplifies the problems with bi-lingual education. My daughter has atended school there for 5 years and has had some very good teachers. Her 5th grade teacher is excellent, but that does not make up for the ciriculum. The overemphasis on speaking spanish all the time gets in the way of reading, writing and math. Although Ms. V is a great 5th grade teacher, my daughter will not attend in grade 6. She will not be ready for HS if we keep her in Inter-American. The principle needs to be fired for many reasons. Tax dollars going to waste-too bad. Says a lot for vouchers, considering the amount the CPS spends on this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2005

My daughter began to attend this school in kindergarden she is now in 1st grade, and I have been very dissapointed at the outcome. She learned more in preschool at another school then she did the entire Kindergarden year at Lozano. The teachers aren't very concerned in becoming more involved with the parents. My daughter hardly ever comes home with homework and if she does it usually involves simply coloring. When I have tried to call the school to speak to the teacher I could not get a hold of her. I believe this school would is benefit of an online site where teachers can post their curriculum and homework and get the feed back from the parents. This way single parents like myself can have more access to knowing whats going on in their childs classroom.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2004

My son and my family had the utmost worst experience at this school that I would never ever wish that kind of stress and frustration on anyone. They are so far behind academically. They need to get rid of the staff and start over. This school needs a principal that has experience and the knowledge to know what works and doesn't work to help these children get ahead in life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2003

I think that this school is very low on their teaching and discipline.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
12%

2012

 
 
60%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
33%

2012

 
 
50%

2011

 
 
58%

2010

 
 
24%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
22%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
61%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
65%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
29%

2012

 
 
44%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
25%

2012

 
 
40%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
53%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
70%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
66%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
65%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
45%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
36%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students12%
Female20%
Male5%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic7%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income12%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities10%
English language learners5%

Reading

All Students33%
Female60%
Male11%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic27%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income33%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities33%
English language learners0%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students29%
Female13%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic28%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income30%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities25%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students22%
Female21%
Male23%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic21%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income23%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities26%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female87%
Male69%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic76%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income78%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students29%
Female23%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic32%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income25%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students25%
Female25%
Malen/a
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic26%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income21%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities29%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students27%
Female30%
Male25%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic24%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income27%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities28%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students27%
Female60%
Male0%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic29%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income27%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities33%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students41%
Female42%
Male40%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic38%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income38%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female55%
Male63%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income58%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students79%
Female75%
Male81%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic78%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income78%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students45%
Female44%
Male46%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities54%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students36%
Female39%
Male31%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic36%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income36%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities42%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Below Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 91% 24%
Black 5% 18%
White 4% 51%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 3%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Maria Teresa Campos

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events found for this school
Searching for school events...
Date
Title
  • {{date}}
    {{title}}
Export calendar
Outlook.com
Microsoft Outlook
iCal Format
Google Calendar
Print Calendar
Uploading, please wait...
POWERED BY
Tandem

Apply

To learn more about enrolling, please call the school.
 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1501 North Greenview Avenue
Chicago, IL 60642
Phone: (773) 534-4150

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Compare this school
to nearby schools

Compare schools »

Compare

Add this school to compare

Nearby schools







ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT