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GreatSchools Rating

Mayer Elementary School

Public | PK-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 2 ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 6 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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30 reviews of this school


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Posted June 8, 2014

I have two kids at Mayer Elementary. This is a great school, with great teachers, and an incredible community. I wouldn't send my kids anywhere else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2014

We transferred our 1st grader from a private school to Oscar Mayer this school year and could not be happier with the results! The Montessori approach has been a perfect fit for our son, who is a more hands-on learner. The teachers are dedicated, supportive and responsive. Ironically his class size (26) is the same as it would have been in his private school, plus every EL1 class (1st - 3rd grades) has an assistant, so his student/teacher ratio is low (13:1). The parents seem very involved and welcoming! We also love the sense of community that revolves around the school. There are a lot of opportunties to get involved and Friends of Mayer is very committed towards fundraising to keep OM one of the most sought-after schools in CPS.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 1, 2013

We have just transferred our child from another excellent LP elementary school, purely because of moving into the Mayer boundaries. We also have a child in the Early Childhood program. So far, we are really very happy with the school. The teachers are friendly, dedicated and responsive, the parent body very committed to creating a topnotch school, and the initiatives to develop the children into leaders and caring individuals, truly impressive. Yes, it has taken a while to adjust to the Montessori way (totally new to us), and possibly more difficult for some children to adjust to smaller groups of same-grade kids in their class (mine is an example), but I believe the benefits of what they learn outweighs this. The current Greatschools ratings and descriptions are not reflective of the reality in the school. I predict a big change in the test scores and ratings this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2013

Well, Oscar Mayer is OK. I am a student who is in 7th grade. Many of us upper grade kids feel that the whole school revolves around Montessori. We feel as if we get less attention for our needs, such as we need to change our schedule many times for the little kids nap time. Every year we need to donate money. There are no upgrades for the older kids. All the upgrades go to Montessori. There are like 15 Montessori classrooms but 3 7th and 8th classrooms. There are split grades. That sucks. The only thing that doesn't make it a terrible school are the out of state trips.


Posted November 8, 2012

We just moved from the suburbs to the city and Oscar Mayer is our "neighborhood public school". We LOVE it! My kids have adjusted really well. Their teachers are wonderful and the parent involvement is overwhelmingly cool! :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 2, 2012

This is our fifth year at Mayer and we now have three children at the school. In short, our children are thriving in this engaging and well thought out learning environment.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 20, 2012

This is our first year here and we are continually disappointed with how the school is run. Yes, many parents are happy, but that seems to be because they have children that "fit the mold" & have acclimated to the classroom without problem. I have a higher needs child & instead of giving mindful focus to her good qualities in order to bring them out, focus is on behaviors that are undesirable for school (yet still completely age appropriate) and are dealt with negative reactions that include threats and punitive punishment. We wanted our child to attend Montessori so her spirit could be nurtured, but instead, our 3 year old has faced a variety of non-nurturing emotions ranging from disappointment, abandonment, discomfort and isolation. Since starting school, our once happy child now calls herself "bad" & has exhibited a series of behaviors related to stress including nail biting and bed wetting. Other behaviors that we would only see occasionally, like hitting and nonsense talk, have increased. Majority of faculty is very young and inexperienced. Instead of looking for the root/cause of a behavior to help children having a problem, they seem to view the child as a problem.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2011

I am a parent of 2 kids at Oscar Mayer in the 3-6 year classroom. So far, it's been terrific. I understand the Montessori system very well. OM does a good job with it. Some issues I'd like to address: Class room size: The class rooms are a bit small, and yes, the kids sometimes do their work in the hallway - this is NOT a big deal, as I know of another private school Montessori that does the same thing. Class size - This is tricky. remember, in the 1st class room, the 3-6 class, there's going to be a need for a solid child-to-teacher ratio, however due to CPS regulations, it is sometimes difficult. OM does a solid job, using assistants, and sometimes special needs assistants to help out. It is a tough situation, but OM is doing the best they can given their resources. Diversity: This makes me laugh. I'm not white. Here's the deal, if you want the school to be successful, you NEED the neighborhood to fill all its spots. Have you seen the LP Neighborhood that OM is in? It's 90% white, but here's the deal, the parents are educated, middle to upper class, and work pretty hard. That's really what you want, I think. Ok, I think the school is great. I hope it continues!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 9, 2011

My daughter attends Mayer's Montessori Program. Truely an amazing school:) We could not be happier!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 26, 2011

I'm an 8 year old currently attending the third grade.So far each and every teacher I've had has been excellent especially my current one Ms.Sankey who I'm starting my third year with. The parents and principal have been great!


Posted August 25, 2011

We transferred our 1st grader to O.M last year from private school (a recurring theme of parents at this school) after becoming increasingly impressed with the administration, resources and parent group over the past several years. We have been thrilled. The education is fantastic, the teachers are dedicated and the administration is forward thinking. O.M. is well on its way to becoming one of the best schools in the city. The negative reviews of the school both on this site and in general generally relate to a lack of spots for students outside of the district. While this is true, it is simply a byproduct of those in the community now embracing the wonderful opportunity that O.M. presents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2011

my child attended preschool at OM in 08 the class she was in also had children with special needs in class i ended uo taking my child out of the school because the child that was austic violated my child while she was using the bathroom the teacher scared my child so bad to keep this secret told her that she would get fired if she told me the truth the principle scared her they called themselves trying to scare my child quite and took her outta the waiting room where i had been picking her up from everyday and put her on a school bus it was only after i ran around this school like a crazy lady looking for my child that she was found and brought back to me also i had a meeting with parent whom hadnt been informed of what her child had done until minutes before the meeting and all she could say was that he touchs and pokes to get what he wants Totally unexceptable i contacted the regional office the board of ed police and dcfs i needed answers asap as to how this was allowed to happen to my child and why when i first addressed it to the teachers they told me it didnt happen school started in sept my child was out of there by oct this i definetly dont recommend this school to snyonr


Posted May 18, 2011

School is overrated and overcrowded. This place is run less like a school and more like a factory. Teachers have too many kids to pay adequate attention to them and classes are overstuffed, so children are doing their work in the hallways. In the 3,4, and K class, too many 3-year-olds mean teachers spend much of their time getting the youngest ones dressed and out the door. Older kids get less teacher time. Parents are type-A and cliquish. In the younger grades, the classrooms get less and less diverse as minorities are pushed out by the children of middle class professionals living in the Lincoln Park area. Classes go from mostly African American in 6-8th to mostly Caucasian as the kids get younger -- the dividing line being the year the school began to develop a reputation.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2010

the school is improving at a fast pace , it will be a top school in chicago in the next few years.highly recommended !!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 13, 2010

I have a son in Kindergarden and my daughter just started pre school at Oscar Mayer and I feel so lucky to be part of such a wonderful school! The teachers are awsome and so caring. The office workers, lunchroom staff, principal ect... are the best, always smiles on their faces. It is such a positive place and I'm so happy my children start off their education in a positive way!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2010

I have 3 children attending Mayer, I could make that 2 because my oldest just graduated 8th grade and I am so happy. Mayer has disappointed me in that I have one more child entering kindergarten and they put her on the waiting list #444 to be exact. They told me there is no chance that she can go there. Montessori program is nothing but a ploy to get those who live outside of the Lincoln Park area out of the school. The classes are over crowded, there are some GREAT teachers there but mainly you here nothing unless you are on the play lot every week and happen to catch the teacher walking by. The student are unruly and there seems to be no discipline. if you are thinking Mayer is a great even good school, take a look at there scores, you'll see differently.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 16, 2010

This school appealed to us because of its free all day developing Montessori pre-school program. Their pre-school classrooms seemed over crowded which raised questions for us regarding the attention and safety our child would get. Their extracurricular activities (after school programs, language, music, art, & drama) make it very appealing to us. In the end we had several issues with the school which did not convice us that are child was in the best learning enviornment for our young child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2010

The diversity and community aspect of the school provide a safe and comfortable environment for learning, exploring and sharing.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2010

The teachers are doing an awesome job as the school has grown. The parents and community provide a tremendous amount of support and energy every day.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2010

My daughter is five and her education has been fantastic. She comes home every day with new topics and I can not wait until my second daughter attends in the fall. Great school, teachers and parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
96%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
62%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
67%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
66%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
59%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
56%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
66%

2010

 
 
72%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
53%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
81%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
60%

2010

 
 
68%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
57%

2010

 
 
82%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
55%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students88%
Female88%
Male88%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White98%
Low income72%
Not low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female76%
Male75%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic75%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White93%
Low income48%
Not low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female76%
Male79%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low income63%
Not low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students73%
Female76%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White90%
Low income58%
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students85%
Female85%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic88%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White95%
Low income75%
Not low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female67%
Male67%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income58%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female75%
Male60%
Black53%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female81%
Male63%
Black72%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income64%
Not low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities78%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students53%
Female75%
Male38%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income46%
Not low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female59%
Male38%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income41%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities56%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students55%
Female64%
Male44%
Black47%
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income48%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students84%
Female91%
Male75%
Black79%
Asiann/a
Hispanic87%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income79%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities94%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students55%
Female53%
Male56%
Black47%
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income50%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities75%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students48%
Female53%
Male44%
Black37%
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income46%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
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9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 45% 51%
Black 24% 18%
Hispanic 22% 24%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 1% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
School social worker/counselors(s)
Security personnel
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Garden/Greenhouse

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Katherine B Konieczny

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Garden/Greenhouse
  • Gym
  • Library
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
Girls sports
  • Cross country
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Design
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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2250 North Clifton Avenue
Chicago, IL 60614
Phone: (773) 534-5535

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