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GreatSchools Rating

Murray Elementary Language Academy

Public | PK-8

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 6 ratings
2012:
Based on 5 ratings
2011:
Based on 3 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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45 reviews of this school


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Posted September 26, 2009

Murray is a community melting pot teaching kids the benefits of a multi-cultural environment. Parents are active and display an atmosphere of family and community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 25, 2009

Murray Language Academy has excellent administrators, teachers and staff, and fosters a dynamic learning environment with a strong parent support base.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2009

Murray is a great school with dedicated teachers and faculty, great kids, and involved parents. We are so proud to be a part of the Murray family.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2009

The parent involvement is astounding! We have just begun 6 six programs including NASA robotics, violin, shakespeare, newspaper, math and science club, cheerleading . . . wait that is more than 6!!!! Go wild cats!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

Great teachers; Great students
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 17, 2009

Our parents are very supportive and involved. Our students are excited about learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Murray Language Academy is a great school. It is parent, student and teacher driven. You feel a part of the community. The students are eager to learn. The teachers provide a great learning environment. Parent's ideas are listend to and addressed. My son loves Murray.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Murray Language Academy is a wonderful school! There are no strangers there. Helpful, caring staff and teachers, the parents are incredible. The students are so tuned into learning. They're eager and capable. We're sooo lucky!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Murray Language Acadamy is a great school. My child feels comfortable there and the people work together as a community.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 16, 2009

Murray is a semi-selective public school that is small and diverse. There are good resources, a wonderful library, art room, and shared gym with the Chicago park district. Parents appear to be interested and involved and I'm excited to spend the next seven years as a parent to a Murray student!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 8, 2009

Murray is a fantastic school thanks only to the great teachers and parent involvement. The teachers are dedicated and the parents give of themselves relentlessly. However, I have found the goal of the school's administration to be misguided. I thought the education of the children was primary, but soon learned that the PTO, principal, and LSC have an agenda of their own! Their agenda does not includethe best interest of the children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 12, 2009

School has great potential; however, the new principal does not have the ability to lead this school forward. Indecisive and lacking in leadership. Many excellent teacher; however, there are too many who are allowed to get by, to the detriment of the students. Hopefully, the outstanding teachers will continue to somehow maintain the school's reputation. Administration is 'very' political and teaches to the 'test,' rather than to the student.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 30, 2009

What makes Murray so successful are the children, their parents, and the community in which it resides. The administration is only concerned with the political aspects and not student learning and teacher professional development. Murray has the potential to be an awesome school and I hope it becomes a place that values all students, parents and stakeholders and not just those with PTO, LSC, CPS, or other political connections.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 1, 2009

My son has attended Murray since kindergarten (he's now in 3rd gr.). Since we began Murray, we have seen two principals and three APs. Clearly, there's a disconnect somewhere. What I love most about Murray are the children, parent involvement and the teachers. The Administration is a bit to be desired but all else is well. Clearly Murray is doing something right and the scores prove it. Great job!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2008

Murray may be a great school but my younger son was denied as an applicant to the preschool program and my older son has gone to murray since kindergarten... It puzzles my why they would split up 2 brothers so close in age!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2007

I currently have two children at Murray. Murray is a school that is going through many changes. I feel the school has not found stability. The school seems to be moving in a positive direction in terms of academics. (I feel the pressure every night to make sure my children have done their homework and to ensure that they're reading 30 minutes a day). But after being at murray for the past few years. I've become quite annoyed with the ever expanding classroom size. My oldest with 34 and my youngest 33. I don't understand how teachers are expected to cope, some without any assistants. I have come to realize that my children are just another number and that I shouldn't expect my son's individual needs to be met. I feel the school needs to focus on the emotional and individual needs of their students. Rather than their ISAT scores.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 4, 2007

Having gone through 3 principals (not including interims) since my older daughter first attended kindergarten here, Murray has had her ups and downs. Under the leadership of the current principal, normalcy has finally been restored in the last two years. Parental involvement is great. The teachers are a mixed bag. For the most part, I have only admiration toward the professionalism, patience and even-handedness exhibited by the lower grade teachers. I was very disappointed in some upper grade teachers, who were incompetent, lazy or lack of enthusiasm. Since Murray s grades only go up to the 6th, and it is becoming an open secret that the 5-6th grade teachers are not up to par, Murray is slowly loosing appeal to families that value education as a top priority. I would still recommend Murray to families with very young kids. However, Murray needs to re-vamp the upper grades to stop the stampede for exit.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 6, 2006

Murray is an excellent school -- that cannot be denied. Because of the school's grade structure, I no longer recommend the school to anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 18, 2006

Murray has great programs that are not usually offered at other schools, elementary or High School. My child is taking music lessons in the mornings and participates in the academic after school program. After the after school program a well balanced meal is provided for each child. This year they hope to get ball room dancing. Murray Language Academy is a well rounded school. I would recommend this school to the parents who love to be involved. The teachers, principle and staff will make you and your child feel secure.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 31, 2005

I love school and I love that fact that my child is absorbing knowledge in a great atmosphere as Murray. The parental involvement has much improved and it shows in the classrooms and teachers. I like that fact that the students are challenged according to their individual academic needs, so every child is not put in a general category of learning... that's not how life works and it shouldn't be how our schools work. It certainly is not how Murray works. The teacher and student morale has skyrocketed in the last two years that my child has been here. I love school and so does my child , thank you to the principal, teachers , students and parent volunteers.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
86%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
50%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
n/a
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
n/a

2010

 
 
n/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students83%
Female87%
Male81%
Black79%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income79%
Non-low income87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female87%
Male81%
Black81%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income75%
Non-low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students85%
Female82%
Male87%
Black84%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income85%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students86%
Female82%
Male90%
Black84%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income82%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students97%
Female96%
Male97%
Black98%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income97%
Non-low income96%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities96%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female56%
Male67%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low income69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female59%
Male73%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income58%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students50%
Female48%
Male52%
Black46%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income46%
Non-low income54%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities54%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female69%
Male48%
Black57%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income58%
Non-low income61%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female69%
Male57%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income62%
Non-low income65%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female83%
Male57%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income68%
Non-low income74%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students82%
Female90%
Male75%
Black80%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income79%
Non-low income87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female59%
Male58%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income50%
Non-low income68%
Students with disabilities (IEP)30%
Students without disabilities66%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students58%
Female53%
Male61%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income46%
Non-low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)50%
Students without disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Average

Reading growth at this school

Average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 75% 18%
White 11% 51%
Two or more races 7% 3%
Hispanic 4% 24%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Gregory Wesley Mason

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • French
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
Girls sports
  • Cheerleading
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

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TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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5335 South Kenwood Avenue
Chicago, IL 60615
Phone: (773) 535-0585

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