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GreatSchools Rating

Tanner Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 418 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 1 rating
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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10 reviews of this school


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Posted October 25, 2013

I have no good review for this school. My granddaughter attend Tanner, I would like for her parent to place her in another school that is willing and able to work with the parent who are concern about there child(ren)'s educations. We have had complaint and the issue have not been addressed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 10, 2012

In my opinion Tanner has a Great Principal. I have known the principal since he was in his late teens and I must say that he is a great person, his best attribute is his compassion. Definitely known by his peers as one always seeking the peaceful resolution and with the level of popularity he experienced countless intense situations would have took a turn opposite of peaceful without his intervention or with his approval. Regarding a comment made by a parent about an incident in April, relating to her child being mistreated while the principal watched. Of course I was not there but I again have known the principal for many years and I along with any other individual who knows him question the validity of that comment. The principal is a man of good character and the student as well as the faculty are Blessed that he is the leader there. To the parent who has every right and duty to fight for her child, as a parent of a 12th grader I know and understand how important that is for the all around well being of a child. I really don't think you received accurate info. The principal is definitely not a person who would mistreat a child or stand by and allow it, he wouldn't.


Posted April 24, 2011

As a parent to a child that attended this school, I must say that I am very disappointed in the way its ran. My son was physically harmed by a teacher and the principle refused to assist. On top of it his grade point average was well below average. Now he is attending a school on the northside of Chicago and is above average in math and reading. Thanks for nothing Tanner.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2009

My son graduated from Tanner in 2005, at that time it was a totally different school. I was confident and comfortable with the staff, teachers and the education my son received. My daughter attends the school and is in 4th grade, and I am totally disappointed in the lack of discipline and professionalism exhibited by some of the staff and administrators, in addition to the unruly students. My daughter has above average scores, and my husband has often been told by her home room teacher that we should look into putting her in a gifted program. I am very disappointed because I feel the children are not monitored enough, the staff seem to be inattentive to the parent's concerns and the classwork is not challenging, that we have opted for a private school next school year for her. Her education, well being and safety come first. Don't send your child here!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 4, 2008

This school is horrible when it comes to the welfare of their students. My children attend this school only because this is their in district school. They give you one day notice when it comes to field trips then begs for chaperones on no notice but they can have students bring home flyers for fun day where all proceeds go back to the school 30 days before the event and can't put the money back into the school. I am a parent that stays on my childs education and i wont say that all the teachers and staff there are bad but the majority are only concerned with their well being. I would not recomend this school to anyone else.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 26, 2005

My child is currently a student at Tanner shcool. I am a graduate of Tanner class of 1985. The teachers that I had were great and so far the teachers that my child has had have been great with the exception of one. Ms. Blackburn was his kindergarten teacher and that woman is awesome. My child came to her class 3 weeks after school had began,(due to a transfer)and was reading after one week in her class. His present teache Mrs. Shaw is also incredible. I credit both of them with my sons excitement about wanting to go to school. But to the parents who place blame on the teachers. They are not perfect. However your childs future begins at home.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 9, 2005

I have major concerns about this school. My child don't receive homework but once or twice a week. The teachers seems to be more of just here to get paid no concerns about the good education of our students. I'm very disappointed . The students are not dicipline their wild pretty much. The principal and the assistant principal are not getting more involved about the students of this school. This is not a school I would recommend for anyone who want the best education for their child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 14, 2004

I graduated from Tanner Elementary School back in 1999. I attended tanner Scool from kindergarten through 8th grade. I graduated salutotorian, the second highest in my class, thanks to the four most woonderful teachers in the world, my second grade teacher, Ms. Titsworth, my fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Shelley Brown, and my two eigth grade teachers, Ms. Angela Moss, and Mr. Launder Carter, the teacher who is now serving in the army. Thanks to them, I am who I am today, a hardworking law-abiding citizen. I have much respect for all of the teachers and staff at henry O. Tanner Elementary School, and I encourage them to keep up the good teaching . The world needs more teachers and schools like Tanner School.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted June 21, 2004

Tanner Elementary is a great neighborhood school with concerned teachers and regularly improving and ever changing programs designed to meet the needs of its students and the community. Faculty members, educational support staff, administrative and pupil personnel specialists are always available to discuss issues of concern to parents and community residents. No appointments are needed. The isolated incident mentioned by another parent whose review appears on this site grossly overstate and misrepresent the facts. School programs are indeed available and were offered during the earlier part of this school year (2004), their creation and promotion are in large part determined by the financial support of the Chicago Board of Education and other funding sources. It is unfortunate that this parent did not make full use of the resources and interested individuals who are always available to listen to parental discussions about their worries and problems.
—Submitted by a staff


Posted March 19, 2004

This school is a big disappointment to me, I was a student at this school years ago and I have noticed that it is not the same. The teachers are so into themselves. There are no extra activities at the school. My son is in eigth grade, his previous teacher had to leave because he was in the reserves and they now have a new teacher. The students complain about the school, teachers, admistration. My son's teacher has no patience, instead of him helping the children, he gives them the answers. This is a critical moment in my childs life and I feel like they don't take out the time to sit down and talk to the students. There are no accelerated opportunities that the children would be interested in. The caliber of teachers that actually no how to teach is ridiculus.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
55%

2010

 
 
58%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
38%

2012

 
 
63%

2011

 
 
48%

2010

 
 
43%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
72%

2010

 
 
51%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
43%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
45%

2010

 
 
35%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
75%

2011

 
 
43%

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
27%

2012

 
 
64%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
56%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
24%

2012

 
 
38%

2011

 
 
46%

2010

 
 
39%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
57%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
44%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
17%

2012

 
 
56%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
41%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
68%

2010

 
 
49%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
52%

2012

 
 
55%

2011

 
 
53%

2010

 
 
47%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
50%

2010

 
 
42%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
57%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
39%

2012

 
 
71%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
59%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female40%
Male54%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income47%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students38%
Female33%
Male42%
Black38%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities41%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students47%
Female50%
Male44%
Black47%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income44%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)27%
Students without disabilities52%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students43%
Female42%
Male44%
Black43%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)18%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students70%
Female66%
Male75%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income67%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)64%
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students27%
Female29%
Male26%
Black28%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income25%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities31%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students24%
Female21%
Male26%
Black25%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income22%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)17%
Students without disabilities28%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students44%
Female42%
Male45%
Black44%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income42%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities44%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students17%
Female25%
Male8%
Black17%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income18%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)8%
Students without disabilities19%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students52%
Female42%
Male61%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income51%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities64%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students52%
Female45%
Male58%
Black51%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income51%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)25%
Students without disabilities62%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students70%
Female72%
Male68%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income69%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)36%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students48%
Female67%
Male33%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income49%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities59%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students39%
Female50%
Male31%
Black39%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Non-low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)0%
Students without disabilities55%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 100% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Hispanic 0% 23%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

Oops! We currently do not have any teacher information for this school. We rely on the state Department of Education, the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), and in some cases school administrators such as registrars and principals for this data.

What makes a great teacher? Study after study shows the single most important factor determining the quality of the education a child receives is the quality of his teacher. Here are some characteristics to look for »

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Kenndell L Smith

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
School leaders can update this information here.

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7350 South Evans Avenue
Chicago, IL 60619
Phone: (773) 535-3870

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