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GreatSchools Rating

Waters Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 630 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 20 ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
No new ratings

Teacher quality

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45 reviews of this school


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Posted Tuesday, November 18, 2014

As parent of waters, I agree the school has come a long way as neighborhood school. Based parent involvement and community support, you would expect continued academic growth for our children. The academic performance, test results and student growth rate, should be on an upward trend. Test scores, have plateaued or declined and we rank nationally below the 50th percentile in math and reading across many grade levels. We appreciate the hard work and dedication of many of teachers and staff to our children. It is the administration's and the principal responsibility to develop the staff and implement the appropriate measures to address performance gaps with the staff and curriculum. In addition, it is the LSC's responsibility to hold the administration accountable and ensure the action plan to improve the school's performance is followed through on. I would encourage parents to go on-line and review the CIWP (Continuous Improvement Work Plan). Review the section for the ILT (instructional leadership team), there are no comments or evidence to support the implementation of the plan. Current leadership at Water's should not accept average performance, our children deserve more!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted Tuesday, November 18, 2014

I have two children, one who is now in high school and another still at Waters. I am so thankful for the fact that I live in the neighborhood and my children can attend a school that they have NEVER been made to feel unsafe. The teachers and administration have a zero tolerance policy on any type of bullying and for the more than 11 years that I have been a parent I have never seen an incident of violence or bullying on the playground ,EVER, nor have my children ever come home to tell me about any such incidents . For the most part there seems to be a great deal of respect between the teachers and the students. I also want to share that my son who always struggled in Math has in the past two years gone from a 1 percentile (yes that's right) to a 33rd percentile carrying a high B average this year with NO help from his parents. Mr. Gil , along with my son's other teachers came together and put a plan of action out for him including after school tutoring and before school tutoring . I think Waters School is doing everything right , I am sorry to hear parents who have had negative experiences but that's not the school experience my family has had at all.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2014

As someone who has been involved with this school since before Mrs Crespo (Kipp) was principal, I will tell you how far the school has come. We have had great luck with hard working teachers, and yes the community has embraced this school and made it what it is today. So it's clear there's one parent who had a bad experience, and has chosen to post multiple negative reviews. But if you talk to parents on the playground, the feedback I get is immensely positive. This local school has sent my daughter on to Lane Tech, and given my son a place where he is enthusiastic about school. We're lucky to have this gem as our local school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2014

This is a wonderful school community in the city. It has dedicated teachers, staff, and families. It offers so much more than the average CPS school due to parents fundraising and the principal being receptive to that involvement and working with parents to make changes everyone sees as important for going forward in education. There are things that could be changed , as with any school, .even the top rated schools will have things not everyone will be happy with. But the bottom line is that Waters fosters children that are well versed, multicultural, respectful of people and their environment, love the arts, excel in their subjects and feel safe and taken care of at the same time. My child went there for six years and had great grades, tested well, made lifelong friends, developed a love of learning , and is doing great at her junior high school because of it. Did I love every teacher? No. Did I love certain homework assignments/projects? No. But welcome to the real world. Will you love every co worker you have, every boss, every job you are assigned, chances are .NO. Waters students have a bright future in my humble opinion.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 17, 2014

Our child, now in fourth grade, has been attending Waters since pre-school. Her growth as a person and student has been tremendous. By integrating fine arts, computer science and ecology with the basics, she's been exposed to a well-rounded learning environment. Is the school perfect? No. Can communication between teachers, the administration and parents improve? Sure. I'd venture to say that's true at nearly every school. I've found, however, that Waters' leaders are open to ideas. They are willing to reverse course on concepts that don't seem to be working. Also, the administration seems pretty adept at maneuvering through CPS' byzantine bureaucracy. Prospective families need to understand that Waters has a very active parent community that's helped propel the school forward. But that involvement also seems to have created a feeling among some that the administration should respond to every whim and whisper. At the end of the day though, this is a CPS school and it is bound by rules handed down by the board. To me, the most important thing is this: my child LOVES to learn and that desire has been nurtured at Waters.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2014

What I expected: A progressive, professional, open administration who welcomed parent involvement and listened to parent concerns. Excellent, inspiring, respectful teachers. Rigorous instruction. An involved parent community. My experience : Pluses: Amazing gardens; some great teachers; an involved parent community. Minuses - A principal who consistently fails to hire and retain excellent teachers; who lacks vision, leadership and communication skills. She has repeatedly ignored my correspondence, failed to adequately address serious concerns regarding my children, tried to intimidate, embarrass and humiliate me so that I am afraid to ask for anything or express an opinion for fear that my children will suffer. Overall, mediocre teachers. While there are some great teachers there is a culture of disrespect and laziness that comes from the top down. Look at the test scores to see where we stand academically. They speak for themselves. My experience may not reflect that of others. I am delighted for those who have found Waters to be exactly as expected but sad for my family and those others for whom it has proven so disappointing. We are looking at other options.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 14, 2014

Our son has been going to Waters for the past six years and we have been truly happy with what he has learned as a student and as a respectful person of a community. The art program is fantastic and the ecology program is amazing--the pride our son has in learning about his environment, recycling, and nature is truly inspiring. He has had attentive and wonderful teachers and to address some of the below concerns, his grades have always correlated with his test scores. I have always treated the administration and front desk staff with respect and therefore they have treated me with respect back. I give the school 4 stars for two reasons: 1) I am a very hard rater and rarely give anything a 5/5 2) like all CPS schools, there is always room for improvement and I think this school will get there. For all of you who have been unhappy with the school and its administration, I am sorry for your experiences and truly hope you find a school that meets your child's needs better.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 12, 2014

I thought I transferred my daughter to a great school Waters, to only find out the parents and community are the ones who have built this school into what it is now . My kid has been bullied and when I've tried to reach out to the office staff (including teachers ) , they basically told me that my kid was a liar etc... my kid has came home crying and refusing to go to school . I have brought this to the attention of the principal "Crespo" and she has refused to speak to me , the office staff seems to be intimidated by her and her ways she's speaks to them is very unprofessional and rude , I believe is the reason why the staff In the office is not useful . Crespo needs to realize she didn't change the school (previously art teacher ) the parents and neighborhood are the ones who have made this school what it is , but including teachers and principle they are extremely rude and inconsiderate about how the parents feel when it comes to the best of the parents knowledge with their own kids . Horrible experience , not to my expectations !!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 11, 2014

Do you live in Waters' School District? Please come to an LSC meeting to gauge the dynamic, meet our principal, and see if it it seems like a good fit for your family. It is for me. When I toured schools before enrolling at Waters, three principals spontaneously expressed profound respect for Ms. Crespo, for her vision, leadership, and success at making Waters a thriving school. As treasurer of Waters' fundraising group, I have collaborated closely with Ms. Crespo. She is a dedicated professional who cares deeply for our students, teachers and staff. Waters school is successful because she is at the helm. Ms. Crespo meets with parents who ask for meetings. She is professional at LSC meetings. There may be tension with parents who try to tell her how to run the school. So be it. We are a neighborhood public school - not a co-op where parents weigh in equally on how to run the school. I don't envy any CPS principal. It is an extremely difficult job in which it is literally impossible to please everyone. Thankfully, Ms. Crespo's 4-year contract was just renewed in the Spring. I look forward to her continued leadership for years to come. -Vanessa Caleb Herman
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 10, 2014

Our whole family loves Waters school! The neighborhood community is amazing, and my kids love their fabulous teachers, especially in ecology, music, and art. I can't believe how much they're learning every day and look forward to many more years at Waters! We have always found the administration, including the principal, open and welcoming. We feel extraordinarily lucky that this is our public school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 10, 2014

My child had attended Waters Elementary from preschool to first grade. The preschool teacher was excellent, but once we got to the other grades, the teacher quality definitely dropped. My son has ADHD and we were trying to deal with his behavior without the use of medication. We even had a 504 plan implemented and went to regularly scheduled conferences with other faculty members (minus the prinicipal) which did not make a change in his behavior so he fell behind drastically academically. When we pleaded for more help from staff members, we were quickly shut down. I believe it had to do with financial costs they would have to pay for extra help for my son. When I requested to speak with the prinicipal, it took her more than 1 week to get back to me. I had to threaten to go to the school board in order to get her to call me back. I had great hopes for this school but it truly did disappoint me so much so that my family and I moved to Elmhurst. I am so glad we made the move because not only are the teachers attentive, involved and caring, but the prinicipal is actively involved. She even attends all the meetings we have had for our son. It's defintely a 180 degree change
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2014

Personally, I think the rating system here is rigged! Waters being a 5 and all. The energy of this school with the parents, teachers and faculty are amazing. As a parent whose child is in the kindergarden class, I was so surprised about how much money the parents have been able to raise year in and out. My child has drama, gym, art, music, and math/computer class. The teachers are great. As a realtor myself, when I list a property and say Waters on it.... it sells. Why have we been stuck at a 5 for 3 years. We are on same path as coonley, bell, blaine etc. Parents, this school is on that track! Highly recommend!!!!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 6, 2014

I have a story about Waters. My child needed a doctor s appointment earlier this week and made sure I scheduled it afterschool, not during, because, well, here were the reasons: "Oh I can't miss social studies tomorrow, we're starting our group projects, and in reading we are doing our musical puppet show, and math, no I just don't want to miss math (loves it), and not science because today we are using the microscopes to study the microorganisims." My child has been at Waters for about 10 years and has had at least 16 teachers in this school. They have been engaged, they have challenged, my child is not bored. And the teachers work very well together. The principal meets with the teacher-grade-level teams once a week to address challenges that may need attention, and things that are working. I know no school is perfect, they all have pros, cons, or maybe lack something or maybe not. In my opinion, if the majority of the experience is good, let people know. So I am. I pointed out just a few examples my child loves school. But I could write pages.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2014

More than a neighborhood fine arts school, it s a village.Teachers are wonderful, the space unique - garden, playground and field. A Tier1 on its way up (few lottery spots left).The Admin/teachers are implementing new ideas like Calm Classroom, CAFE reading,Coffee w/Principal, and Healthy Schools.There is a need for house cleaning (mentioned in past post) Dreary Drama, non music, Special Ed, few k-2 teachers who lack interest/skills,and 2 Math Specialist positions-all of whom are not the right fit for Waters. We need to be honest about is/isn't working. 90% of the teachers are truly exceptional and collaborate on weaving art, ecology, science, literacy, writing, math, etc. into the curriculum. The good news is the principal is responsive,has admitted to making poor hiring decisions, and committed to righting them! It is nearly impossible to rid a school of a lackluster tenured teacher, but she is working to make changes. Take a look inside and see if Waters has what your child needs-smaller class size, literacy program, afterschool prog, sports, art, ecology, kind teachers, beautiful environment, possible friendships for life.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 3, 2014

Teacher and parent involvement here is outstanding! They say it takes a village....well this "village" should be proud of their community efforts. Yeah WATERS !


Posted April 3, 2014

I'm proud to be a Waters Elementary parent! I live in the neighborhood, and I feel lucky to be part of this school community. The teachers and parents work together to maintain all that is amazing at Waters -- and to improve when needed. I continue to be impressed with the involved, intelligent, welcoming, kind, and very active Waters teachers and parents. Happy children abound, and the programs offered continue to inspire me daily: Mr. Leki's Garden and the fabulous ecology program, Mrs. Vecchioni's stellar art program, excellent reading and Math opportunities, Calm Classroom, Chinese New Year celebrations (and many other opportunities to celebrate and learn about various cultures/holidays/etc.), Field Day in the Spring, field trips, the Variety Show, the Spring Big Night fundraiser, Spirit Week, just to name a few. Fabulous families, amazing kids, and a spirit of teamwork among the teachers, administration, and students create a cooperative educational environment!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2014

Waters is a great neighborhood school. Though like many neighborhood schools there is a small faction of parents who seem to run everything - they do an absolutely fantastic job but it can be a little hard to really get involved. Additionally, I feel that the principal is a good administrator but not great with kids and the same goes for the assistant principal.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2014

Great teachers, great programs, great Parents, great kids! Feels like a family where the kids can grow, learn, and be kids!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2014

This is one of the best schools! The staff, the Principal Ms. Crespo and the parents show everyday their passion for education and put our children first! I have 2 granddaughters attending this school and I volunteer every opportunity i can. Just LOVE Waters!


Posted February 19, 2014

Waters is a good school. The best thing about it is its ecology program. The art teacher is very good. The music program used to be wonderful...until the excellent music teacher went back into the classroom. The music program has suffered greatly since then. They had one teacher for one year, are trying out another, but these teachers seem to not understand how to get the kids excited about music. Hint--it's not worksheets and essays!!! The drama teacher is terrible, as almost EVERYONE knows. That is a shame in a fine and performing arts school. The quality of the teachers varies, as in any school, but they are mostly solid, with a few lemons. Not a bad school. Great parent community.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
76%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
76%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
73%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
61%

2010

 
 
60%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
74%

2010

 
 
71%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
68%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
88%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
84%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
71%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female40%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic41%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White85%
Low income26%
Not low income85%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learners0%

Reading

All Students75%
Female72%
Male77%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White89%
Low income58%
Not low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities78%
English language learners30%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students62%
Female64%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic39%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White82%
Low income36%
Not low income87%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female82%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic54%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income53%
Not low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students86%
Female89%
Male84%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income75%
Not low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female62%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White63%
Low income54%
Not low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female69%
Male53%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic52%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White78%
Low income51%
Not low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students63%
Female65%
Male60%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income51%
Not low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students71%
Female71%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income67%
Not low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female59%
Male57%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic40%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White64%
Low income53%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities63%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female69%
Male72%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic50%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White79%
Low income68%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students88%
Female86%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White86%
Low income88%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students59%
Female56%
Male62%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income59%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students66%
Female65%
Male67%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic69%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White80%
Low income65%
Not low incomen/a
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 47% 24%
White 40% 51%
Two or more races 6% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
Black 3% 18%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Music teacher(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
Security personnel
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Rock band
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Mrs. Titia M Crespo

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
  • Soccer
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Music
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Rock band
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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4540 North Campbell Avenue
Chicago, IL 60625
Phone: (773) 534-5090

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