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Pritzker Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 669 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 4 ratings
2013:
Based on 10 ratings
2012:
Based on 9 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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66 reviews of this school


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Posted May 24, 2014

I went to this school for 2 years (middle school) and it was just so-so. I had teachers ranging from good to awful (some making sure i'd succeed while others threatened to fail me for no reason). The atmosphere is slightly odd, and looking back I wasn't very happy there. There was a bullying problem in multiple classes that was not dealt with at all, the teachers and adults being completely unresponsive. Not the best school, could improve greatly with effort, communication, and a reevaluation of how things are done there.


Posted May 22, 2014

After 5 years of my child at Pritzker and 20 years as a professional Educator I think I have a background qualified to "rate" this school. It is not a coincidence that their test scores have fallen consistently for the last 3 years. To this point my experience with the RGP has been disappointing. The bulk of the assessed work is being done at home. The standard of "Teach, Assess, Adjust" is unknown. The Admin. and Teachers commonly blame the students for problems. "How could whole gifted classes be a problem? I ask." For a parent and professional Educator to be disappointed in a gifted program that should tell you how severe the quality of the regular program is. The responsibility falls on the Admin. and their lacking leadership and integrity. I leave off with one word, Charade!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 1, 2014

There are many anonymous complaints about the school and I have heard negative things about the Spanish teacher on other forums. However I disagree and think she is doing an excellent job with my son's Spanish development. He was having trouble earlier and it would be easy to blame her but I found that he was not putting the effort forward in class, forgetting to bring homework home and we as parents were not working with him. Fortunately there is Spanish spoken in my home so perhaps it is easier but I still will not blame the teacher. Edward Reagan parent
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 30, 2014

I have children in both programs at Pritzker and both are so happy. The fine arts classes are amazing, and rare at an elementary school these days. The music, art, drama, and dance teachers are amazing. All the homeroom teachers we've had have been dedicated and thoughtful. They take great care with the children and have balanced the different learning styles among the kids. The student population is more economically and racially diverse than most CPS schools. The Library and science lab are new. The technology lab is being reahabbed next. There is full A/C, many wonderful extracurricular activities, and many very involved parents. Every school has weak spots and Pritzker is no exception. There is friction between the parents of the two programs. Each side feels the other gets more attention. The administration can be slow to react to issues, often because it is trying not to exacerbate this friction. I've heard a lot of complaints about the Spanish teacher's ability to run a class and my child in Spanish does hate it. I wish that were different. Overall this is a great school and we are as happy as our children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 28, 2013

This is our third year at Pritzker and we are very happy there. Pritzker has an outstanding arts programming with amazing art and music teachers. They offer drama and dance to all ages. My child started at Pritzker in the 1st grade and we felt immediately welcomed by the community. This is also one of the truly diverse schools in the city and that is one of its assets. The front desk staff I have always found to be helpful. They know my child by name and know what classroom she is in without having to ask. Once, when my child forgot her lunch at home, the front desk staff went down to the lunchroom to make sure she took a hot lunch even though she did not have any lunch money with her. The parents have done amazing things at this school, including a recent library renovation, upgrading the auditorium sound system, purchasing an ipad cart and more. The school does 1-2 musicals every year which include all the children who want to participate. The PTO sponsors great activities, the highlight of which is Science Night which included viewing solar flares through a telescope. The teachers are great and really dedicated to the students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 22, 2013

This is my son's 2nd year . He had a wonderful teacher last year. I can only say positive things as I have an older son and have noticed the difference in learning . I see quite a lot of parents actively involved in the school. This to me means a lot. I hope that this school continues success .
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 21, 2013

As a parent who was involved with this school for over 3 years I am not shocked by the bad reviews of Pritzker! My daughter attended the fine arts program and I was shocked by the fact that there was very little supervision, bullying, yelling at students, unsupervised lunch and recess ( I became a volunteer because I was extremely concerned). The front desk staff and administration are rude, unwilling to answer/ address important questions about the level of violence/ bullying (yes! There is a lot of bullying and any parent/ person who says there isn't is a sorely mistaken!). If a parent raises concerns/ is too vocal about the problems in the classroom the administration blames the teacher or the parent raising concerns. I'm honestly not sure how someone could give this school a great review?? I wasn't impressed with my child's home room teacher ( music and art teachers where ok). I really wish I would have had a chance to observe the classroom/lunch/recess before we enrolled our daughter!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2013

My children attend this school and have are in both tracks (fine arts and options) for several years now. They are both very happy with the school. Fine Arts opportunties are exceptional and available to ALL students, in all programs. Parent groups are open to ALL parents of all backgrounds and all parents are strongly encouraged to get involved with the school in any way they wish! No one is excluded. I The accusations of constant violence and bullying have not been our experience at Pritzker at all. Though of course statistics cannot speak to individual student's experience, those researching the school might want to check out the 5Essentials survey (completed by students and teachers, and developed by The University of Chicago Urban Education Institute. This survey has a lot of objective statistics and information on CPS schools. Pritzker's safety ratings (bullying, safe environment) were very strong, and well above CPS average. You can find out this and much more data about the school at the CPS survey link https://cps.5-essentials.org/2012/s/610229/measures/safe/
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 24, 2013

Pritzker school has awesome primary staff ( I would give this program five stars) and ancillary teachers and is an incredibly diverse school racially, and economically. One of the reasons our family chose this school. It has an incredible fine art program, with art and music full time teachers with a middle school student ability to focus on one area of the arts (drama, art, dance, band or keyboard classes). That is most positive thing about the Fine Arts middle school. Academically speaking, if your child can gain acceptance into an Academic Center, run don't walk away from the middle school program. With the exception of only three or four of the middle school teachers, these teachers can be extremely unprofessional in the classroom; bully, bait, curse and shame students while the admin looks the other way. Events happen at this school due to parent volunteers who organize and have hands in or run activities. Some parents have too much control given by the admin and exclude those who do not belong in the same tax bracket or ethnicity. Office staff is often uninformed or rude, esp if English is not your native language. Our family is glad to have left this school this year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 17, 2013

All those glitters is not gold. Music, art, spanish, dance, and theatre for the children is a promise. Principal does not know how to run a school with foresight. There are severe problems that leak into the education. Ex: The school went 2 semesters without a Spanish teacher so the kids had Spanish scheduled and were not taught Spanish. After years of Spanish my child could not even say, "My name is __." in Spanish. Principal is very good at shifting blame. Spanish teachers fault. Teachers cannot teach because the school won't uphold a basic level of behavior standards. I have heard things like, "that is just a bad class" which, again, the blame is shifted. Since when does an administrator get to blame the kids for running things? Children's fault. Do not try to discuss anything with the principal, she is always "meeting a deadline" and expects your children to communicate school activities with you. She will criticize you when you go in to clarify the disturbing things that your child reports for taking the word of a child. This school is pushing hard to fill slots, so ask yourself, if it is such a great school, why do they have so many openings so often? I volunteered often Ed.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 26, 2013

My child is in his 3rd year in the options program. Largely I have been impressed with the quality of the teachers, some are phenomenal. We had some issues with bullying, but I was vociferous about the issue and it is resolved. The school has an amazing fine arts program -- the music and dance programs are exceptional. The choice program is adequately challenging but yes, class sizes are large (32). There is a great group of dedicated parents who are making improvements and fundraising. The weak link is the administration, particularly the principal. Pritzker is poised for a renaissance, but it needs a visionary to build a strong coalition of parents and faculty, not just a "manager". My child is happy there and loves his teachers, but I do agree the administration tends to be "reactive", not "proactive. I believe this will change in the near term. In the meantime, other parents that I know whose children are there are very pleased with the school. Pritzker contains an "options" program, a magnet program and a neighborhood program. It is a very diverse community, which I find valuable.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2013

I am very happy with the progress my kids ae making. I was a bit apprehensive when I had to split them in to both programs RGC/FineArts. The teachers have made all the difference and the administration worked hard after the strike to do more with less. Now that we have the recess aides things have gotten better. Lunchroom atmosphere could be better, but I can honestly say it was about the same 30 years ago when I was a kid. I highly recommend the school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 25, 2013

This is my daughters first year here and at First i was very excited. I was looking forward to a rigurous curriculum and many after school activities to stimulate my child. She will be not attending this school next year.. One day she came home with a huge not on her head and the school failed to call me.. which is a huge laibility.. when i called the nurse she said that they had recorded my number being called but i carry my cell phone with me at all times and never received a call.. when i toldthe nurse that my daughter said that he did not even receive an ice pack but instead a wet paper towel to apply to her wound.. the nurse said " oh well thats because we are out..do you know how many kids get a injures a day"... are you serious.. also there was a boy who bullies my daughter and has ripped her luncg tray and thrown it away and etc.. when my daughter finally stood up to the bully because obviously the staff and monitors were unconcerened.. my daughter was given a wriiten misconduct...and yes sometimes the staff can be a bit rude..I pay so much to transport her to and from school and I am finding its not worth the extra stuggle...
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2013

My child had transfer to this school from a private school setting. Up too transferring him to this school he did exceptionally well. My child has lost interest in school and his teachers do not care to get it back. It took close to two months to get a meeting with his teachers. When I approached the school case manager she felt it was not her responsibility only the teachers. I didnt feel that I was supported by the staff at all. I feel its not fair for my child that here he has a parent that is very interested in his education and we were not getting the support we needed. May I add that I had to contact the assistant principle twice. Finally my child is getting back on track but I agree with a previous parent when your child is not in the gifted program it appears the average child does not get the support and they get lost in the system.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2012

There is potential here but this school is far too uneven to receive high ratings. There are kids who do well here, but too many don't. For a gifted school, they are pretty bad at understanding truly gifted children. Kids who are smart, quiet and do fine with a lot of sitting/teacher lead instruction and testing will do fine. Everyone else... It's a roll of the dice. Administration is checked out, although that may improve as a few high profile parents put their children here. There is a dedicated and really wonderful group of parents who are a huge asset to the school, but their efforts are too often ignored or undermined by administration. We were here for two years before pulling our child out. The difference in this child in the new school is remarkable -a truly different and now happy and challenged child who is enjoying learning. The school may be on the upswing but it has a very long way to go and it's hard to justify having your child there while they figure it out or someone figures out how to get the LSC to do something about the principal. Now experiencing what a good school looks like at our new school I can definitely say you and do much, much better than Pritzker.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 22, 2012

I am giving the school five stars but I am basing my rating on our child's class alone. We are lucky enough to have gotten into the RGC so the other students in our child's class create a challenging environment that our kid thrives in. The teachers have been hit or miss. Some of them have been great. The others have been lazy or just downright slow. But again it is tough for a child to do poorly when the class s full of bright kids. Now the worst part of attending Pritzker has got to be dealing with the principal and her staff. I have seen her bully parents, scream at entire classes of kids when one kid was doing something wrong. If you have ever attended an LSC meeting it is almost comical how much Dr Reese just ignores rules and does whatever she wants. It is just really horrible and there is nothing anyone can do about it as CPS has bigger problems than a bully principal. But then...how long will she really be there. Hopefully we get a new principal soon who installs an entirely new office staff. The current staff puts forward the least professional environment possible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 21, 2012

Every CPS School has challenges. True but If a child is being harassed by teachers due to a conflict with a parent, his/her educational needs are not being met. Visit the school...you will not see all those great things that the parent below described unless your child is in the gifted program. Pritzker School does not care about the below-average students. My daughter was humiliated two years ago at this school. I transferred her out and she is doing very well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 29, 2012

My family is entering it's 4th year at Pritzker and our teaching staff is excellent overall. A few examples: our music teacher recently completed her doctorate from Northwestern University -- our art teacher has an MFA from University of Chicago. Pritzker works hard to find ways to challenge students academically -- and integrates the arts into the core curriculum. A student's Fine and Performing Arts experience includes Art, Music, Dance, Drama, School Musicals and recently, a Visiting Artists program and Poetry have been added to the standard subjects. After and before school programs on campus have doubled this year! Many things make the school UNIQUE: A climbing wall in the gymnasium, Computer Labs/Internet Access, an Illinois Prairie & Fine Arts Garden, our On Site Pottery Kiln, a Library, Mobile iMac & iPad Computer Labs, a 400 seat Performing Arts Auditorium, a newly renovated Science Lab, a Festival of the Arts and a winning Stock Market Club. Every CPS school faces challenges. I am enthusiastic about the growing support Pritzker receives from the parent community and the Wicker Park neighborhood. Our potential is incredible.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 18, 2012

I would not send my child to Pritzker School. The staff is very uncaring if you are not part of the cliche. My child's academic needs were not met at te school. The administration can be rude sometimes about voicing your concerns.. the middle school programs need to be revamped to meet the mathematical needs of middle school students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 28, 2012

Pritzker is a great school!! If you would like to find out more and talk to a variety of parents...Join us for Popsicle Pop-Ins on Saturday July 21st from 10 to 11 and Saturday August 18th 10 to 11 on the school playground (Evergreen). We all work together to make it work.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
81%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
77%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
85%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
88%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
84%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
67%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
69%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
87%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students64%
Female62%
Male65%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanic58%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income45%
Non-low income93%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female77%
Male63%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanic63%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income51%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female54%
Male69%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income32%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)40%
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female57%
Male66%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic52%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White78%
Low income43%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)10%
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students84%
Female80%
Male89%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income73%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)60%
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students71%
Female85%
Male57%
Black61%
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income54%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students67%
Female76%
Male58%
Black57%
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White91%
Low income51%
Non-low income82%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities77%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students75%
Female77%
Male73%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income69%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female74%
Male76%
Black67%
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income67%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)33%
Students without disabilities83%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students73%
Female94%
Male52%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanic81%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income72%
Non-low income78%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female78%
Male72%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income65%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students83%
Female90%
Male76%
Black72%
Asiann/a
Hispanic94%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income79%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities85%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students67%
Female66%
Male69%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income59%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students69%
Female66%
Male71%
Black52%
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White92%
Low income61%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities72%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

Close
This school
District
State
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 38% 18%
Hispanic 31% 24%
White 23% 51%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 3% 4%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Security personnel
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Performance stage
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
School Leader's name
  • Joenile S Albert-Reese

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Security personnel
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Football
  • Track
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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2009 West Schiller Street
Chicago, IL 60622
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-4415

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