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GreatSchools Rating

Ariel Elementary Community Academy

Public | PK-8 | 550 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 2 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
No new ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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26 reviews of this school


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Posted yesterday

Ariel Community Academy is a great school that places a value on critical thinking while working with the children to circumvent unstructured learning. From the principal, teachers, counselors, security and lunch personnel, the commitment from them is evident every day. Additionally, there are various affinity groups that work with the young men and activities that help with promoting an environment where students are challenged to think creatively about what they are learning. Thank you Ariel for making our child's experience an excellent one!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 17, 2014

If you are searching for a school where the administration (i.e. Dr. Coleman, Ms. Madkins and all of the exceptional teachers) talks and educates not only your child but you about managing finances. Children are taught to follow financial markets and as a class make investments; they are assisted by industry practitioners that understand how to make money with financial markets. We have been with Ariel for four years and can't wait for the school year to start. They really are a wonderful community school and I applaud all the hard work the staff and administration (even Althea and the rest of the culinary workers) put into educating your child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 14, 2014

The school is very supportive and provides excellent programming for children with ADHD and/or emotional needs. They have a team that works with you and the services that are provided are done in a manner that does not cause embarrassment for the child.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 21, 2013

Quality of this school has gone down. Disappointed in the administration for letting so many things occur. The students are unruly, the teachers yell endlessly at the chidlren, there are little to no field trips. My children will not be returning. I can't wait until the administration realizes there is an issue and things get better.


Posted March 7, 2013

I'm a very concerned that this school has taken a turn for the worse. This school is definitely not what it used to be. There are so many behavior problems now. The students are cursing, running, screaming and a few of the teachers and staff are worse than the kids. I don't want to name anyone personally but threatening kids is unaccpetable. The kids are indeed out of control but there has got to be a way to handle these chidlren. Children are being exposed to inappropriate behavior and subject matter that they would otherwise not be exposed to. I don't know where these students came from or what happened to change things so dramatically. The climate has definitely changed at Ariel from the parents to the students. One child left in 6th grade and my other 2 won't be returning. Dr. Coleman has gotten extremely lax and I'm dissappointed and disgusted.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 2, 2013

When My children began attending Ariel I thought it was a great thing. That was until this year when the 4th/5th grade Writing and Social Studies teacher Mr. Brown slapped my daughter. Although he will not admit it, he has admitted to a staff member that he threatened to slap her. He has also been putting her, and other students in the closet. He's even grabbed my other daughter by her arms and shaken her. The principal Dr. Coleman won't do anything to protect my child. She acts as if nothing has happened. That frightens me. My daughters are scared to go back to school, and I feel helpless. Ariel is currently on academic probation, and now there is a teacher that is a threat to students. Parents have to worry about the safety of their children when they are not in the classroom. They shouldn't have to worry about the safety of their children inside of the classroom. Especially when teachers are supposed to protect them, not strike and threaten them!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 24, 2013

ariel is a good school that most of my friends go to I am trying to get enrolled here as soon as possible I will be a credit to ariel not a regret


Posted January 1, 2013

HOW CAN I START OK ARIEL IS THE GREATES BUT ONE THING I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR 1 YAR ALREADY I WANTED MY CHILD TO GET IN THERE BUT IT IS A LOTTRY SO I DONT UNDERSTAND THE WHOLE LOTTRY THING SO NOW I FOUND OUT THAT MY COUSINS CHILD IS GOING THEIR WITH OUT A PROBLEM SHE IS IN 6 GRDE SO WHAT IS THE PROBLEM ?????????????????????????????????????????? I AM SO LOST ???????????????????


Posted April 30, 2011

I think that Ariel is a good school and can be great with some tweaking. They have extracurricular activities for the youth, strong teachers, and a good principal that works hard on behalf of the students. They need better character education and monitoring of the older students (4-8th grades) because they can be quite disrespectful, belligerent, and obnoxious. That makes me fearful about my child staying there long term due to these negative influences. I'm sure these older students are smart; they just refuse to use their home training when unsupervised afterschool and in the hallways. The foul language would make a sailor blush and it's not cute. Overall, I love the school and my daughter does as well.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 29, 2011

Excellent school for students who come to school to learn. Small class sizes, wonderful teachers who are committed to the students at Ariel. A positive, enriched environment for students. Ariel ISAT scores are excellent and the students have a variety of extra curriculum activities.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 1, 2011

Ariel is a great school for students to persue different areas of interest. They have partnered with different programs offered in Chicago including Metro Squash through the University of Chicago. I had two children graduate and go on to excel in high school and one who has a full scholarship at college. I also have a student currently attending who is very involved in activities and does well each year on standardized tests.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 6, 2011

Ariel is an excellent magnet school!! Small class sizes, selective enrollment, financial literacy, great teachers and principal and smart students. The school test scores, are extremely high (92% science & math/ 89% reading). The parental involvement is amazing, which shows the students that education is important and valued. The children wear uniforms and Algebra, English, and Spanish credit, can be earned for high school. Additionally, Spanish is offered to all students in grades 6-8th. Ariel offer before/after school care to students. Ariel graduates continue their studies at the top high schools, including; Jones, Young, King, Brooks, Payton. Kenwood(UofC Magnet Program), Bronzeville Military Academy, U of C Charter H.S. and Muchin College Prep(downtown). Sports offered;Flag Football, Basketball, volleyball, cheerleading. Also, dance, girls and boys scouts! This is an excellent school to consider for your children. Take a closer look at Ariel!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 20, 2009

I have two children at Ariel (a set of twin boys). I beleive Ariel is a great place for child if you are willing to do the work as a parent. Advocate for your child and stay right on top of the teachers to ensure your children are meeting their academic goals. Pull them from the school if you are not happy!!!!!!! Parents should make the final decisions for their children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 30, 2009

I have four children, all of them attended Ariel. What happened at Ariel really left a bad taste in my mouth. My 2 oldest were part of the clicque and were pretty self sufficient. They were pretty much set as far as being given opportunities. They both e My younger two were not so lucky. My youngest daughter was allowed to pass along even though she was receiving failing grades in her classes in the name of keeping all the kids together. The same happened with my son who was really struggling in his classes and falling asleep in class. I tried everything and even spoke to the curriculum director and the principle concerning this. I was then referred to have an IEP done on my son. Long story short. I pulled my son out because he wasn't being served well here!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 13, 2008

We found this school worked for us. You will find that there is not perfect school, principal or human in the real world. You have to work with your own child be visable in the classroom. Communicate with the teachers and not get too involved in the things that are not pertinent to your child. Check the scores for the benchmark grades, check the high schools that these children are being admitted to. And just like anything else if it does not fit your particular child find a place where it will be suitable for you.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 27, 2007

I have been a parent at Ariel for two years and I can tell you this is not a great school.The students are out of control and if you are in the click nothing happens to your child. The teachers come and go things are not right here my husband and I are trying our best to get our child out. For the parent, that mention the LSC you are right you cannot get a straight answer about the LSC
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 16, 2007

Ariel is one of the best kept secrets of the south side. They are small and close knit. The kids are intelligent and articulate when you visit classrooms, the teachers look and act professional. The principal is the most intelligent woman I ever talked to, she knows everything. There are a lot of males working with the students in the building. The curriculum is cutting edge. Students invest money an do better that real stock brokers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2007

There is alot of bureaucracy here and you have to be in with the school click. Your child will suffer otherwise. The academics are great but they have a big behavior issue and it goes unaddressed every year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 17, 2006

I was satisfied with my daughter's kindergarten teacher. Academically, I was satisfied, but it would be nice if they could have had language and/or computer opportunities for primary students. Other than that critique, they have very good before and after-school programs.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 5, 2006

I have had very little contact with the school thus far, however I do not think parents are that invovled and if they are they are not that organized. I have put Ariel on a list of school to look inot further, however I have not been able to get a concrete time from them as to when the LSC meeting will be held. I have called for 3 months in a row and the answer is always 'We don't know' with no furhterr assistance offered. It may very well be a great school but the system seems very flawed to a new parents like me!
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
60%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
87%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
86%

2012

 
 
98%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
59%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
92%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
85%

2012

 
 
73%

2011

 
 
69%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
75%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
58%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
85%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
62%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
89%

2010

 
 
81%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
90%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
59%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
85%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
91%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
95%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
87%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students44%
Female42%
Male45%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income43%
Not low income50%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students60%
Female71%
Male52%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Not low income80%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students86%
Female87%
Male86%
Black86%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female68%
Male72%
Black69%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income65%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students85%
Female79%
Male93%
Black85%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income83%
Not low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities89%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female74%
Male80%
Black78%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income69%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female58%
Male68%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Not low income86%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities76%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students58%
Female61%
Male53%
Black59%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income54%
Not low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities61%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students62%
Female61%
Male63%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Not low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities68%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students61%
Female56%
Male65%
Black60%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Not low income70%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities71%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students59%
Female60%
Male58%
Black58%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income52%
Not low income90%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities69%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students91%
Female88%
Male94%
Black91%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income89%
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities98%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students46%
Female44%
Male48%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income39%
Not low income64%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities51%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female54%
Male38%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income37%
Not low income71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities49%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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10

Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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State
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10

Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 98% 18%
Hispanic 2% 24%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 0% 4%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Two or more races 0% 3%
White 0% 51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students PE instructor(s)
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Arts & music

School facilities
  • Performance stage
Performing and written arts
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Lennette Alyce Coleman

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Library
  • Performance stage
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Flag football
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Softball
  • Tennis

Arts & music

Performing arts
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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1119 East 46th Street
Chicago, IL 60653
Phone: (773) 535-1996

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