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GreatSchools Rating

Edison Elementary Regional Gifted Center

Public | K-8 | 269 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 1 rating
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 3 ratings
2011:
Based on 4 ratings

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96 reviews of this school


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Posted September 24, 2008

We love Edison. My kid is happy and loves going every day. The teachers and administrators are engaged and welcoming, the other parents are great, the new building is gorgeous.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2008

I disagree with the previous poster and believe that she no longer has a child at the school. The new location is a beautiful new building. Yes, it does not have as much green space as the previous location, but a new playground has been installed. The fact that they have recess is a plus; many CPS schools do not. The transition has been better than expected, I think. My child has adapted well as have many others. My husband and I have been very pleased with our experience with the school, the staff, the parents and the other children enrolled at Edison. The principal is a very caring administrator. One of the best in CPS. Overall, a really great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2008

My daughter has been at Edison since Kindergarden. The school was located in the Edison Park area and I was thrilled with the teachers, administrators, ciriculum, etc...However last year the city told us we had to move into the Albany Park neighborhood into a brand new facility that is shared with the Albany Park Multicultural students. Parents fought hard to keep our kids in Edison Park but in the end the city won out, as usual, and we were forced to move. Administrators, teachers and parents all worked hard to make the move as seemless as possible and have worked hard to make sure there is minimal disruption to the kids. It's been tough. However regardless of the location, the teachers are amazing, parent involvement is great and administrators are accessible and receptive! My daughter is working at a 4th grade level and loves her school and friends!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 22, 2008

We are new to Edison so I supposed time will tell---we did not have to experience the move and started our first year already in the new building. The building is amazing, especially if you've visited other CPS facilities, which I have. Brand new, nice classrooms, really good shape. The principal is dynamic and involved. The few instances of disorganization on the first week were dealt with promptly. We get excellent communication from the school (something I never got with our previous private school). My child's teacher is warm and welcoming and has great control of her classroom, and my child is doing interesting challenging work well above her grade level. There are plenty of 'specials'---art, music, and gym every week as well as science lab. We love Edison and feel so lucky to be there!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2008

Edison Regional Gifted Center really disappointed us. It does not live up to the hype. This is not a school for gifted children and while it is accelerated it is working at the level of most private schools. 1-2 grades ahead. It has recently moved to a new location on Sawyer Ave in the Albany Park Neighborhood and it is at best to be decsribed as chaotic. The work my child is receiving is to easy. The school Principle and Vice Principle really lack leadership qualities and the school would not be what it is with out the parent volunteers. Before applying here I suggest you vist the new physical plant. It is nice and new but it lacks green space. The children play in the street at recess. There is a new play ground being built however it is very cramped space.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2008

I am pleased with the daily challenges that the teachers of Edison provide for my daughter. Higher level thinking skills are taught as well as life long learning skills. She comes home daily feeling empowered!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 3, 2007

Edison is a selective enrollment school. Children must test into the school. As a result, the student body is generally above average to extremely bright academically. There appear to be fewer safety and discipline problems than with other Chicago public schools. The teachers are caring. There is significant parent involvement considering that the school draws students from the entire north side of the city, although a few parents are obsessed with the 'gifted' aspect of the school. Since the students live throughout the city, it is difficult for the school to sponsor many extracurricular activities. Children may not have as many friends in their own neighborhood because they do not attend school in their neighborhood. Children may spend over a hour in the morning and an hour in the afternoon being bussed to the school. I believe that Edison is one of the best elementary schools in Chicago.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 11, 2007

Edison is in general a very good school. The best teachers there are Mr. Barber, Mr. Matsumoto, and Mrs. Strelecki. A few of the students there really belong in a neighborhood school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 1, 2006

While I believe the education here is excellent by CPS standards, a lot of the teachers don't seem to understand gifted students and spend a lot of time yelling.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2006

My daughter attends Edison and we have been very satisfied with her overall education so far. Edison is very good at evaluating the students and making sure they are challenged. Having said that, I think they teach to the ISATs too much, albeit with all the pressures schools receive, I can hardly blame them. They have a great fine arts program and a private company comes in and offers music. Edison doesn't offer much organized sports, but they do have basketball team for the middle grades. The kindergarten teacher is fantastic, but the quality of the teaching drops until third grade. Edison enjoys strong parental involvement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 30, 2004

It was very hard for both my daughter and I when my husband's job transferred him out of state. Leaving Edison has been one of the hardest things we had to do. As a parent, I enjoyed helping around the school, it was great to see a school where everyone worked as a team, and as a family, with the same goal, for the wellbeing of the children. To be part of Edison's family, was an honor and quite an accomplishment for my daughter. I'm glad my daughter had the chance to attend such a fine institution; which to me, is one of the Best public schools in the city of Chicago. Academically it is excellent, and most of all the staff, teachers, students, and parents' involvement is the key to this school's success. Once again, it was very unfortunate leaving Edison.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted February 4, 2004

Edison is a great school, for bright and, according to the entrance guidelines, 'gifted' children. The leadership from the principal and assitant principal is strong; they are both dedicated and qualified individuals committed to the well being of our children. The teachers are great, well qualified, and teach students in groups based on assessed abilities by subject. Parental involvement is high, safety and discipline are of no concern at Edison, but extracurricular activities are limited due to the majority of the students being 'bused.' A great school!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2003

My kids love this school both socially and academically. There are some fabulous teachers here. However, there are a few teachers who shouldn't be here as they haven't been trained specifically in gifted education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 15, 2003

First, No child has 5 hours of homework a night! CPS has a homework policy that even at 2 grade levels above doesn't allow for that! This is a great, nuturing school that provides a challenging environment for gifted students with their peers. It is an extremely safe school environment with few discipline problems none of which been serious in the egiht years our child has attended. Because the school draws from about half the city of Chicago, extra cirricular activites can be hard to arrange. Most people in Chicago know that sports at the elementary school level are done through the Chicago Park District. Other extracirricular activies are sponsored through the school and need parental support and involvement to be sucessful. If you get the chance, I strong urge you to check this wonderful school out.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 25, 2003

I agree that less emphasis should be placed on their homework and more placed on children being children. However, this school teaches children with gifted minds and parents should understand well in advance whether or not they and their children can tolerate this form of education. It is up to us as parents to dictate their abilities and know when enough is enough. If the child is in need of challenge on a daily basis, Edison will give it to him/her. I believe children should be given the opportunity to use their knowledge to their fullest capacity. Education is a very important asset. Although there have been some small occassions of disagreement between the teacher and I, the best interest in my child was always first and foremost. For this reason I have to say, Edison is a very good school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 10, 2003

Although Edison is one of the best schools in the city, my concern is not acedemic but social. All I hear from the kids is that they have at least 5 hours of homework a night and the weekends are spent in the library. I think that there should be a little more time for fun.


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
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2012

 
 
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Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
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2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
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Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
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Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
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2011

 
 
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2010

 
 
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Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
97%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
100%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
100%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic100%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students97%
Female100%
Male93%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities97%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students100%
Female100%
Male100%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low incomen/a
Not low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities100%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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This school
District
State
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
White 50% 51%
Hispanic 20% 24%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 17% 4%
Two or more races 8% 3%
Black 4% 18%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Nurse(s)
PE instructor(s)
School psychologist
School social worker/counselors(s)
Speech and language therapist(s)
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school community.

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Special education / special needs

Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

School facilities
  • Science lab

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Music room
Music
  • Instrumental music lessons

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
Staff resources available to students
  • Speech and language therapist(s)

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
School facilities
  • Gym
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

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and more! Get started »

School basics

School Leader's name
  • Donna Jean Oberhardt
Fax number
  • (773) 534-0539

Programs

Foreign languages taught
  • French

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • School psychologist
  • School social worker/counselors(s)
  • Speech and language therapist(s)
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Cafeteria
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Music room
  • Science lab
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Let your school shine!

School leaders: Help your school shine on GreatSchools
by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Cross country
Girls sports
  • Cross country

Arts & music

Music
  • Instrumental music lessons
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Parent involvement
  • Join PTO/PTA
Note: Data provided by community members,
needs to be verified by school leaders.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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4929 North Sawyer Avenue
Chicago, IL 60625
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-0540

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