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GreatSchools Rating

South Loop Elementary School

Public | PK-8 | 784 students

We are best known for diversity.

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
Based on 3 ratings
2013:
Based on 5 ratings
2012:
Based on 4 ratings
2011:
Based on 5 ratings

Teacher quality

Principal leadership

Parent involvement

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72 reviews of this school


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Posted September 30, 2008

I have had nothing but negative experiences with the principle and teachers. The Assistant Principle is nice and helpful. She also tries to help you when you or your child has a problem. Other than that, SLS seems to prioritize getting its funding and status at the cost of your childs education.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 13, 2008

My child attended the ECC, and she had an absolute great year. The ECC provided a great foundation for entering K, and she was reading and performing simple addition and subtraction in her preschool class. The teacher and aids were wonderful and nurturing, and we will miss them all. We hope to have another child at the ECC next year!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 3, 2008

I would recommend to every parent to stop by unexpectedly in the middle of the day at ECC (the tuition based pre school program for children ages 3-5) to check on the quality of the care and service provided. It has been very frustrating for me.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 25, 2008

I am a parent of a 4th grade child in the Gifted Program. I must agree with the post of July 19th, 2007. I believe the school has much to offer and has come a long way. However, the gifted program has alot more to change if it is to truly accomodate the needs of 'gifted children'. I would catagorize it as 'enrichment' for smart and hardworking kids. The students are given a ton of work, photocopied out of teaching manuals, maybe, at most, one grade ahead. Not 'gifted education'. When a gifted child masters something, they crave to learn more. Not repetitive work of something they already 'get'. It would seem that the school should model their program after Lenart Academy who seem to really understand gifted educaction and their students. Too bad, as the school has alot of parent involovement.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 14, 2008

Great School, Great Principal, Great Teachers, Great Before and after School Program, Great Parents, Beautiful Neighborhood next to Great Park, Recess, Art, Music, Gym, Library time, Tae-Kwando, Soccer, Scouts, fun homework and an excellent Gifted Program. :)
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 31, 2008

Luckily I see more then most parents as I volunteer for many activities to stay current with what is happening at South Loop. I see discipline. Better than what we had in the suburbs (in a good school district). Maybe the teachers are harder on those in the higher grade levels, but when you see what I see, its warranted. Maybe they do not get it at home and so South Loop has to use it. As far as school work, I feel that the teachers do an excellent job. Not perfect by any means, but a good job and the test scores are improving all the time. When I worked at a suburban school, cramming for ISATS was the norm. So blame the state, not the teachers. I believe that South Loop is getting better everyday. Instead of being negative, volunteer!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 27, 2008

South loop school is not really a good place to send your child that much because my son says that the teachers are not telling the students things that they should know ahead of time.For example the grades for the science fair for 2008 my son still has not gotten his grade. Fights break out all of the time,student bathrooms are dirty at points,and students break the rules.The parents are also not kept imformed.The students say that the principle is mean to some of the children in 6-8th grade.The acadimics are not that challenging either.South Loop Elementary pretty much stays the same year after year
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 23, 2008

I see minimal, if any, learning going on and have not over the years. For the first half of the school year, the teacher spent the vast majority of each day complaining to the students about a discipline problem. Not all subjects are covered daily . . . ever -- maybe math all day one day, dealing with discipline problems another day, and reading all day another. If you make a complaint, you are treated as the enemy. A month before the ISAT, students were being crammed with material that they should have been taught all year. Parents are not kept informed. I have received all of five graded papers all year long! No emphasis placed on academics but all stops pulled out for a PreK-8 grade dance and hoopla over a fence. I used to think it would get better but year after year, it has remained the same.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 4, 2008

My child has been at South Loop for a number of years now. We have been pleased overall with the education and programs offered by the school. No school is perfect, but the reality is South Loop is one of the best schools out there. I would recommend the school to family who want a school that offeres you a great mix of kids and a good solid education. Looking back I would not change sending my child to South Loop.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 5, 2008

I am a parent who just recently enrolled my kindergarten daughter at the South Loop School. So far I have been very disappointed. The office staff is not friendly at all. When we first arrived to enroll my daughter it felt as if we were an annoyance at the end of their day. There was no welcome package of any kind. We had to ask where we would drop off and pick up our daughter. We had to ask for a list of school supplies. We had to ask about lunches. We didn't even realize there was a school uniform until we noticed a student walking by. The staff is completely rude and unflexible. We've had more run ins with them that won't fit on this page. It's sad because the teacher seems to be okay at this point and my daughter likes her school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 3, 2008

Unfortunately we had to pull our child out of this school/program. It just wasn't challenging enough, however it is good for mainstream learners.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2007

I'm a kindergarten mom as well. My daughter also attended the ECC last year. So far I have been very happy with the school and it's programs. My child is also reading and doing math. Her teacher is great and she also brings homework home once a week. The only downfall I see at times is that the principal and sometimes the office staff are not very friendly. I suppose a 'goodmorning' when I drop my daughter off in the mornings or a 'goodnight' in the evenings would suffice. I do not want that sort of attitude to rub off on the young impressionable children.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 30, 2007

My child is in kindergarden this year and attended the S Loop Pre K last year as well. We have been very pleased thus far. The teachers have been great, the administration has been engaged and effective and our involvement as parents has been welcomed and satisfying!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted November 26, 2007

The education at this school is excellent. Parent politics and some issues with students keep it from receiving a higher score.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 12, 2007

I'm a Kindergarten mom. I don't have any comments at this point since its too early in the year. What I will say however is that her teacher is great and she brings home homework once a week and creative drawings and art work daily. She is reading and writing. So far so good!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted October 4, 2007

I agree with the last poster, My child was in the EEC too. Though only for one year she was always coming home with project she had made in pre school. Her class room was filled with art. The playdough was always out at activity time. Markers and paper were plentiful. Books were everywhere in my daughter's classroom, songs were always sung. It was truly a wonderful time in my child's life. Even today a year later, we were reminiscing through a photo book her teacher made for her at the end of the year. Needless to say we have many great memories. I am still in contact with her pre-k teacher.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 24, 2007

As a 2nd year parent of the tuition based pre-k program, I'd have to say the school is moving in the wrong direction. The lead teachers are good but are overworked and many of the assistant teachers lack creativity. I would give it a score of 6 out of 10. Where is art? clay? Painting? Parents are strongly encouraged to leave the teachers alone!.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 19, 2007

My child was in the so-called gifted program, testing far beyond the 99%. This school hasn't a clue how to meet the needs of truly gifted, most administrators, teachers and parents don't understand the true meaning of gifted. It's more than just higher learning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 4, 2007

I'm not happy with the education my child received during his two years at SL. I feel that I made a mistake by enrolling him in the neighborhood program, despite warnings from neighbors an friends. I am in a position to pay private school tuition, but I am a believer in public education. This school has no real programs. What exists exists for the sake of appearance and making the principal look good. Where is teh fine arts? Where are the performances and celerations of the children? I am limited in space or I would elaborate about my frustrations. I feel the principal and the administration made me false promises when I enrolled my child. He will be going to a charter school next year.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 22, 2007

The academic programs have ceilings and the curriculum does not have the breadth or depth to meet the needs of all students. There are behavior problems in many of the classrooms.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
64%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
90%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
98%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
97%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
82%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
97%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
78%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
86%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
92%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
77%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
89%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
84%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
92%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
89%

2012

 
 
95%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
79%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
98%

2010

 
 
75%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
83%

2012

 
 
100%

2011

 
 
100%

2010

 
 
85%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students64%
Female52%
Male77%
Black49%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White73%
Low income39%
Non-low income76%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities65%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students79%
Female74%
Male85%
Black65%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White97%
Low income52%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students82%
Female83%
Male81%
Black80%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White89%
Low income73%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students81%
Female91%
Male70%
Black76%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White94%
Low income68%
Non-low income89%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female96%
Male89%
Black88%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White100%
Low income86%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities95%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students82%
Female85%
Male78%
Black76%
Asiann/a
Hispanic70%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White87%
Low income72%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities87%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female83%
Male85%
Black76%
Asiann/a
Hispanic80%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White93%
Low income78%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students78%
Female74%
Male80%
Black68%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income72%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities80%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students76%
Female71%
Male81%
Black70%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income69%
Non-low income81%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students77%
Female80%
Male73%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income56%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities77%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students84%
Female91%
Male73%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income63%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students89%
Female89%
Male89%
Black81%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White100%
Low income78%
Non-low income97%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities90%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students79%
Female71%
Male91%
Black74%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income75%
Non-low income84%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities82%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students83%
Female76%
Male91%
Black82%
Asiann/a
Hispanicn/a
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income78%
Non-low income88%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities86%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Above average

Test score rating
Student growth rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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Math growth at this school

Above average

Reading growth at this school

Above average


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 45% 18%
White 29% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 10% 4%
Hispanic 9% 24%
Two or more races 5% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 3% 0%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Art teacher(s)
Assistant principal(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Security personnel
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Chinese (Cantonese)
German
Chinese (Mandarin)
Spanish
Tagalog
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by school officials and community members.

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Awards

Academic awards received in the past 3 years
  • Academic Improvement Award (2007)

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)

Arts & music

Specific academic themes or areas of focus
  • Arts (all)
Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
School facilities
  • Art room
Visual arts
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Vocal lessons / coaching
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Chinese (Cantonese)
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • German
  • Spanish
  • Tagalog

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Gym

Gifted & talented

Instructional and/or curriculum models used
  • Gifted / high performing
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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School basics

Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • After school
  • Before school
School Leader's name
  • Tara Safonia Shelton
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Email
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (773) 534-8689

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • Gifted / high performing
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • Arts (all)
Foreign languages taught
  • Spanish

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Security personnel
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Chinese (Cantonese)
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • German
  • Spanish
  • Tagalog
Extra learning resources offered
  • Remediation
Transportation options
  • Accessible via public transportation
  • Buses/vans for students only
School facilities
  • Art room
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer
  • Gym
  • Internet access
  • Library
  • Playground
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

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by verifying community responses, adding program highlights
and more! Get started »

Sports

Boys sports
  • Basketball
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Track
  • Wrestling
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Printmaking
  • Sculpture
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
  • Instrumental music lessons
  • Vocal lessons / coaching
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
More from this school
  • South Loop School is a partner with Community Schools which enables the school to offer a 8:00 am early morning drop off program, a springbreak/christmas break program (8am to 2pm), a summer program (8am to 6:00 pm) and an after-school program(2:45pm to 6pm) for working families. Parent involvement is our greatest asset.Contact slsvolunteers@gmail.com for more details on parent participation.
Note: Data provided by school administrators and community.
School leaders, update and verify information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
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Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

1212 South Plymouth Court
Chicago, IL 60605
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-8690

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