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Galileo Elementary Math & Sci Schol Acd

Public | PK-8 | 566 students

 

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Last modified
Community Rating

4 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
Based on 4 ratings
2012:
Based on 2 ratings
2011:
Based on 1 rating

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24 reviews of this school


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Posted September 9, 2013

My children's school is great. My 2 older children graduated from this school are now in college and still remember teachers and the principal at that time with warm memories. My son currently attends and he needs extra help the teachers all assist and make sure to try and make it a productive day for my big guy. Communication from the school has always been very good . The school encourages parents to become involved and offer classes I just saw this year to help the 5th-8th graders with Science Projects. Another positive I like about the school is all the different races in one school.- it helps them see different ways, different faces, different foods but yet all the same. They are all boys and girls with the same ideas, passions, dreams, struggles and no one is all by themselves. I love my children's school and would recommend it for anyone.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted August 4, 2013

Galileo doesn't get the credit it deserves for its dedicated staff. It has a small community feeling that makes children feel welcomed and it promotes learning and social skills. There is room for improvement in grades 5th - 8th, but the primary grades can compete with any of the "best" North side CPS schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 26, 2013

My child has had a fabulous Kindergarten year. She loves school, has developed into a fluent reader, asks me to quiz her on math problems for fun and is very excited about her science project. The school strikes the right balance for a well-rounded kindergarten curriculum with art, PE, library, computer science, spanish and science lab. I don't like to emphasize test scores too much but scores at the school are extremely respectable - especially when you take into account that family income is often one of the greatest predictors of results on standardized testing. Teachers and other parents I have met are fabulous and I appreciate the emphasis on keeping class size small and offering many special classes. The principal reports that many of their 8th graders are able to test out of freshman algebra and their graduates get into high schools of choice. A few things could still use some polishing (a near empty website) and I am still trying to find the best way to get involved and support the school. Galileo wasn't my first choice during the application process, but I am extremely satisfied to end up here. They don't do lots of outreach and marketing but don't overlook this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 4, 2013

this school is in an hispanic community.i loved subbing at this school .as a black man i thought this was going to be hard but the kids were easy to get along with.nice working class community too!


Posted August 24, 2012

I was so excited my daughter got into this school in time for her to start 3rd grade! My daughter was wait-listed at #9 and they called me the last Thursday in July to tell me she got in! For 5 years I paid 6K of my 22K salary to send her to Catholic school because all of the schools in my neighborhood had test scores in the 20s, 30s, & 40 percentile ranking which meant not only were the kids not learning much but it means the schools are filled with behavioral issues I would not ever want my daughter to be exposed to! Since arriving at Galileo last fall, her math score went from a 56% to 89% & reading from 70% to 83% and I am sooo happy about that! It shouldn't be so hard to get a quality free education!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 21, 2012

I currently am an 8th grader at Galileo and have been there since preschool. I would have to say that the teachers and staff here are so dedicated so the success of the students. The only problems I have with the school are some of the students. The Majority of them are good, about 90%, but there are those "problems" which you will find every where you go. Certain students are disrespectful but are not bad kids at all. The only other problem is that I wish there was more of a mix of races among the students as it is about 80% Hispanic. Besides those slight problems I feel that Galileo is one of the best schools in the city. I just don't think it gets the respect it deserves compared to competing schools like Jackson or Skinner. I feel that Galileo has prepared me for High School and for life.


Posted August 24, 2011

Because it is so close to Jackson and Skinner (and now STEM) I think Galileo's accomplishments often get overlooked. From what I've gathered from test results and talking to fellow parents Galileo is an EXCELLENT place for your child to begin their education, and the new principle is working with teachers and parents to make it even better. Class size in the 5th grade classrooms when children begin departmental instruction has been reduced to 20 students. A new science teacher has been brought on board (don't worry, they're keeping Ms. Economou!), and they now have a dedicated reading tutor too.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 23, 2010

Our kids are 1st and K and they love Galileo! The atomospher is very friendly and they show academic progress. Teachers are great and pay attention to each students. I saw the comment of racism, but our kids are minorities and they don't see any discrimination. We chose Galileo over Jackson Academy and it was a good choice!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 26, 2010

My experience with Galileo has been great. My child's teacher bends over backwards to help out every student. The staff has always been professional and friendly with our family. The science teacher Ms. Economo is so friendly and fun. I wish I could go back to school just for her Science class! All the teachers from technology, library and gym seem to be engaged with the students. It is a good feeling to have confidence in your children's school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 17, 2010

My child is currently attending Galileo and his experience has been a difficult one. As a parent I do not feel welcome at the school and my child has been made to feel less than successful. I also do not feel that the school is open to the accomplishments of all races when it comes to celebrating the ethnicities of all students. It appears to be geared exclusively to students of Hispanic heritage. Sensitivity training would be helpful here for the faculty, since it is majority hispanic and white with only 2 black teachers.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 8, 2010

Galileo is nestled in the heart of the UiC academic community. I love seeing all of the different nationalities at the school. My child has friends who are Indonesian, Indian, Latino and Chinese, and African . I feel that Galileo mirrors the great history of Chicago when the Near West Side and Maxwell st. were the port of entry to the City. We are fortunate to be in a community with strong diversity and academics.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 24, 2010

My child attended Galilieo Elementary school and had an awful experience. I felt that a few of the staff memebers was rude and needs to be revised. Although the cirriculum is good, not worth it in the end!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 23, 2010

This is my daughters first year at Galileo. She is in first grade and loves it. Ms. D is her teacher and what a great teacher she is. She really makes learning fun. We use Sheridan Park next door for our after school program. The kids take tumbling, craft making or swimming. I feel this is a good way for Galileo kids to get to know each other outside of school. The student population is wonderfully diverse and I must say they are respectful.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 26, 2009

My son is currently in 1st grade and this is his first year at Galileo. On the first day, he was very nervous but I was allowed to walk in with him wait in line and walk to his classroom. Once he saw his classroom he felt at ease and liked the welcoming environment that one feels when you're comfortable with your surroundings (like home). He loves his school and he has learned a lot. I was surprised at how fast he picked up reading! Ms. D is a great teacher, she really teaches her students and communicates the way they will understand. He is doing great in all his subjects. I think Galileo is a great school! I definetely feel secure dropping-off my son at school every morning.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 13, 2009

Overrall I have been satisfied with my daughter's success at Galileo. I would however like for the kindergarten teachers to use best practices such as (scaffolding & differiated instruction) to challenge my son and move him to the next level. I see great gains with his math skill, however he needs to be challenged more in literacy. In addition, it would be helpful if the monthly newsletter reflected the skills they are working on in class for the month so I'll know what to work on at home and not just announcements of upcoming events, that is already given out on a weekly basis.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted December 8, 2008

This is my daughters second year at Galileo and I couldn't be happier with the teachers she's had. However, I have to admit a few of the secretaries in the office are a little snippy at times, would be nice if they were a little warmer in greeting visitors & parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 14, 2008

My younger son goes to this school and we are happy with the teachers ability to win over the young hearts and guide them in the right direction with excellent support from the school management. I want to convey my thanks to Ms. Rose and Ms. W for taking good care of my sons education while he was in their care. My son is very good with his Kindergarten math skills and I feel the school is doing all then can to challenge the young minds. The office administrator is a role model for her peers at other schools.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2008

The reviews I've read are from parents of younger children. My son attended Galileo from pre-school through 6th grade. His teachers were wonderful and his test scores proved that every year. I think that being an involved parent helped him to do well in school and wish more parents would do so. The first time I visited Galileo, I felt the welcoming spirit of the principal, staff and even the children. If it were not for Galileo, my family would have moved to the suburbs in search of a 'good school'. Since my son is now a Senior at Whitney Young High School, it may have been a terrible mistake.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 22, 2008

I have three children in this school. My eldest son has been there for four years and I absolutely love the school. The school has a very good academic quality. My kids are learning alot there and I think it has alot to do with the wonderful staff. The teachers really take pride in what they do.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 2, 2008

My son is in the first grade. He attended a private school for kindergarten. I have been impressed thus far with the curriculum, structure/discipline, and the communication between administration and the parents. The teacher/school provides weekly/monthly calendars which are very helpful in keeping parents in the loop. Even though the school is housed in an older building, it is always clean and organized. The science program is a plus. I am amazed at the things my son tells me he is studying.
—Submitted by a parent


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
96%

2011

 
 
99%

2010

 
 
97%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
79%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
81%

2012

 
 
94%

2011

 
 
88%

2010

 
 
99%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
75%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
71%

2010

 
 
86%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
92%

2012

 
 
84%

2011

 
 
82%

2010

 
 
90%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
70%

2012

 
 
83%

2011

 
 
94%

2010

 
 
82%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
63%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
76%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
65%

2012

 
 
93%

2011

 
 
86%

2010

 
 
91%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
92%

2011

 
 
91%

2010

 
 
91%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
76%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
94%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
72%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
92%

2010

 
 
84%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
93%

2012

 
 
86%

2011

 
 
93%

2010

 
 
89%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
66%

2012

 
 
91%

2011

 
 
96%

2010

 
 
92%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
61%

2012

 
 
97%

2011

 
 
95%

2010

 
 
94%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students72%
Female59%
Male83%
Black56%
Asiann/a
Hispanic74%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income63%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities76%
English language learnersn/a

Reading

All Students70%
Female75%
Male66%
Black63%
Asiann/a
Hispanic67%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income59%
Non-low income100%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities79%
English language learnersn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students81%
Female86%
Male79%
Black64%
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income81%
Non-low income83%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities88%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students75%
Female91%
Male67%
Black71%
Asiann/a
Hispanic71%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income75%
Non-low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities84%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students92%
Female95%
Male91%
Black86%
Asiann/a
Hispanic93%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income92%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities93%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students70%
Female72%
Male68%
Black91%
Asiann/a
Hispanic60%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income68%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students63%
Female72%
Male54%
Black73%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Whiten/a
Low income60%
Non-low income77%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities67%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students65%
Female54%
Male76%
Black62%
Asiann/a
Hispanic65%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income64%
Non-low income69%
Students with disabilities (IEP)80%
Students without disabilities62%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students49%
Female46%
Male52%
Black54%
Asiann/a
Hispanic45%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income50%
Non-low income46%
Students with disabilities (IEP)20%
Students without disabilities55%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students76%
Female79%
Male70%
Black77%
Asiann/a
Hispanic77%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income76%
Non-low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities81%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students72%
Female79%
Male60%
Black77%
Asiann/a
Hispanic72%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income73%
Non-low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities73%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students93%
Female88%
Male100%
Black85%
Asiann/a
Hispanic97%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income93%
Non-low income92%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities92%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students66%
Female61%
Male71%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic68%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low income94%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities74%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students61%
Female54%
Male68%
Blackn/a
Asiann/a
Hispanic53%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income55%
Non-low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)n/a
Students without disabilities70%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

GreatSchools Ratings for this school are based on 2011-2012 test results. Use the breakdown ratings below to compare types of students at this school. Learn more »


Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Hispanic 61% 23%
Black 21% 18%
White 11% 51%
Asian 5% 4%
Two or more races 2% 3%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 1% 0%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2010-2011

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School basics

School Leader's name
  • Jorge A Macias
Gender
  • Coed
Fax number
  • (773) 534-7109

Resources

Extra learning resources offered
  • Title I Schoolwide program (SWP)
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820 South Carpenter Street
Chicago, IL 60607
Website: Click here
Phone: (773) 534-7070

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