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GreatSchools Rating

Chicago International Charter School

Charter | PK-12 | 9200 students

rigorous college preparatory curriculum

 
 
Last modified
Community Rating

3 stars

Community Rating by Year
2014:
No new ratings
2013:
No new ratings
2012:
Based on 1 rating
2011:
No new ratings

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25 reviews of this school


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Posted August 18, 2012

very good school excellent teachers great dierctors great bank manger not alot of bullying their is approite launge . great assembleys great princiables strong leadership my daughter loves cics bucktown if you love your child bring them to 228 S. Wabash CIS Bucktown
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 14, 2010

CICS Irving Park is very impressive (note: test scores are lumped with all CICS campuses). My son is a 2009-2010 Kindergartener. His teacher is highly qualified, motivated and experienced. The Principal and V. Principal are outstanding. Overall teacher quality is top-notch. Academics are rigorous; progress closely monitored; expectations high (especially compared with regular CPS schools). Discipline focuses on positive reinforcement. School spirit and responsible behavior is rewarded during monthly assemblies where "Green Team" kids are applauded and cheered by peers and parents who are welcome to attend and do. Every morning my son is welcomed to school with big smiles and enthusiastic Good Mornings from the staff often the Principal and/or Vice Principal. I feel my son is in a safe, supportive, positive learning environment. We are very fortunate. I highly recommend this school.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted May 3, 2010

Red letters are for discipline problems, it is to inform the parent that your child did not follow the rules. All schools should have the kind of system.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 24, 2010

My son has attended CICS-Ralph Ellison for 2 years now and I am quite pleased. He attended a catholic grammer school and the grades were not always good and he was in trouble a lot...mostly because he was not being challenged enough. Once starting at Ralph Ellison he was a totally different child. I am quite pleased with the curriculm as it does prepare the student for college. The new principal and staff are great. I think if the students come in with an open mind and positive attitudes, they will certainly learn a lot.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 22, 2010

CICS-Irving Park: We have a child in K and are pleased with the tailored learning approach. Our child has made tremendous progress this past year. The school also welcomes parental involvement. The administration is involved and present. The teachers are more than qualified. It's a gem in the CPS system. CICS-IP has exceeded our expectations. I wish they published the test results for the individual CICS campuses.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted September 20, 2009

CICS-Irving Park. I regret the decision I made sending my son to this school. The teachers are so unexperienced, it's pitiful. We are very involoved in the school and our sons education. Irving Park don't have any clue of dealing with children who might need extra help with academics or behavior. They would rather send 50 red letters, and repeat childrens grade level (which I know now is a scare tatic so that you can pull your kid out, and they can make their quota in the limited time they have). Very, very sad! I'm looking into Virtual school or our local Public school. My son deserves the best, and this school isn't it.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 29, 2009

I am sorry that the previous parent feels the way that they do but I am a parent that had a K5 student enrolled. I was involved with the school and I only have great things to say about the school. The faculty is wonderful, the principal is awesome and the teachers are very well educated and care about their students. Yes, it was the first year and things had to be adjusted but that goes for anything new. It is our jobs as parents to be our children first teacher and help the school in doing their job effectively and not expect them to be the parent but a teacher is only suppose to enhance what a parent has already instilled in their child. In short the school is very good!!!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 27, 2009

CICS - Loomis Primary Academy: 2008 was the first official year for this new campus and my son attended in K5. The best way to describe this school is inexperienced teachers coupled with an inexperienced staff. The school got so out of control that they called in staff from another school to come in and train the teachers on how to deal with behavior issues. I mean really this is a bunch of K5 - 2nd graders!
—Submitted by a parent


Posted June 20, 2009

CICS-Irving Park Campus. Kudos on the academia. My children have really learned and made successful gains in reading and math. Poor follow through and communication among administration and staff. The school does not teach cursive writing and allowed the students to publish books with several grammatical errors (teachers did not help to edit???) Do not expect a quick response from either the principal or assistant principal (if you get one at all - I still do not know what the assistant looks like). However, the Dean and school secretaries do respond in a timely manner. There are no science labs or computer classes. School committees are too involved in raising funds to build a new playground (apparently the perfectly good one that exists does not meet their standards) rather than raise money to create a computer lab or science lab or even an actual library.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 8, 2009

Irving Park Campus- Please note that scores are for all 11 campuses. Some are performing above and others significantly below the average posted for all CICS schools. My child previously attended the gifted program at CPS. Once he arrived at CICS-Irving Park it was a shock to see how many skills he was lacking. In the year and a half that he has attended the Irving Park campus, he has grown tremendously in both skills and confidence. I am always in awe of the positive school feel, the attentive teachers, and the helpful administrative staff. I do refer friends and family to the school. A niece now attends.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 23, 2009

CICS Bucktown. I have three children at CICS Bucktown and cannot say enough about the quality education, curiculum and the helpful attitude of the teachers. I have not seen a major turnover in teachers at the Bucktown campus. Most of the teachers really care about the students they are available to discuss just about any aspect of your childs development. They have afterschool programs that help, they are strict but it really is in your childs best interest. If they notice that you care about your childs education they will do everything they can to help you help them. Another parent critisized the school Pricipal for not responding to thier inquireies, I have not had that experience on the contrary I think it is a vote of confidence that his own children are pupils at this school. The only problem I have seen is with some of the parents.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted February 18, 2009

I entered my two children into the 4th and 6th grades and was not happy with the results. My daughter was in 4th grade and was very bored. My son was in 6th and was struggling and did not receive very help. His math teacher told me not to get any outside help like a tutor and so he did not do very well. He was failing math and was not getting any help that was badly needed. The teachers talk to the students as if they are their peers. I do not agree with their rules as well. The principal does not return your emails or phone calls he would rather you work your way up the ladder before he is bothered. Think twice before going to CICS Bucktown campus
—Submitted by a parent


Posted April 29, 2008

In reference to CICS Longwood Academy elementary school . My first year (2005/06) was an absolute disgrace because the teacher was new to the school and straight out of college. Well, after the end of the second quarter I felt the time for change was due. My goal was to switch my child to a different teacher within the school. A teacher that showed experience, knowledge and driven to make a difference in the quality of education my child would receive. I spoke with the elementary principal who advise I could not switch to another teacher. Needless to say I was extremely upset, however my husband reassure me that not all teachers are the same. He was right, the first grade teacher Ms. Dixon-Smith is an absolute God-send. She believes in teaching, discipline, rewards and positive development from each of her students.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 16, 2007

My son attends CICS Ralph Ellison Campus and I truly love the principal and the school. They are way more advanced than most magnet highschools. The principal and staff genuinely care about the students well-being. They expect for them to exceed in all that they do. I feel that CICS Ralph Ellison offers more for the students than CPS can ever. They have laptops to use and they have new books. And I especially like the fact that all of the subjects teach on one specific topic. If the topic that the students are learning about is Global Warming, then they are teaching that in Algebra, Science, Spanish, etc. I recommend the school to everyone who has a child that they want to go to college.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 10, 2007

First, please checkout the individual school. These test scores are for all the schools combined. Which means the higher testing schools are pulling up the other schools. My children's school was sitting at 43% across the board. I have been very displeased with expectations of the teachers. The students were not challenged enough. In addition to, great turnover of teachers and administrators from year to year. Of the 400+ students the PTA had about 10 active members. There were no continuous or actively funded afterschool activities for the children, except for a chosen few in aftercare. The school sported a band, however, they only practiced 2x a week during lunch period so the children never became very good with the expensive instruments. Because of the discipline problem, the school turned into a mini prison; including no talking during lunch. The charter school promised much but delivered little. Signed Parent and Teacher
—Submitted by a parent


Posted March 5, 2007

If you are looking for a quality education for your child Longwood is not the place. The administration in charge doesn't have your child's best interest at hand and they are very hard to contact and communicate with. They have set up a system that has made it hard to communicate with teachers also. The curriculum needs to be reevaluated and more extracurricular activities need to be implemented.
—Submitted by a former student


Posted September 19, 2006

This is my daughter's 7th year at the CICS- Washington Park Campus. Since then she has been the most stable factor in her school experience. Since 4th grade this class had lost at least one teacher during the school year.When replacing the teacher it takes the school such a long time. This year the 7th grade teacher had already resigned. I wonder how long it will be before they replace this teacher. I feel that this class as been missing an extremely important piece to their learning experience. An they wonder why the children are difficult to manage.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted July 13, 2006

My story: I came from a private school where I was performing very badly. I never had a good report card and I was always in trouble. CICS'curiculum, teachers and general desire to see kids learn and perform with
—Submitted by a former student


Posted May 9, 2006

Longwood Campus- My experience with the administration has been horrible. You have to go through leaps and bounds to speak to the real person in charge. I was unaware of a problem that my kindergardener had at school until he just so happened to mention it at home. After numerous attempts to speak with the problem teacher. I never received a phone call back. So, I took a half day off work to go into the school office. After waiting 45 minutes which, at the time the problem had been going on for about a month due to the lack of communication from the teacher. I finally was allowed to meet with someone, only to be rushed from one office to the next, and then finally out of the shcool b/c everyone was rushing to attend a staff meeting. Now, 2mos later, and the resolution is still being shuffled among admistrators.
—Submitted by a parent


Posted January 27, 2006

has lots of opportunities for parents to be involved.
—Submitted by a former student


Community ratings and reviews do not represent the views of GreatSchools nor does GreatSchools check their accuracy or verify the reviewers' identities. Use your discretion when evaluating these reviews.

About these ratings

The Community Rating is the school’s average rating from its community members (e.g., parents, students, and school staff). The highest possible rating is five stars; the lowest is one star.

The test results by subgroup show how the designated group of students is performing in comparison to the general population.
Math

The state average for Math was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
89%

2011

 
 
90%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
51%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
73%

2010

 
 
69%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
54%

2012

 
 
88%

2011

 
 
85%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
46%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
60%
Science

The state average for Science was 81% in 2013.

2013

 
 
73%

2012

 
 
72%

2011

 
 
67%

2010

 
 
57%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
42%

2012

 
 
79%

2011

 
 
78%

2010

 
 
78%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
44%

2012

 
 
69%

2011

 
 
65%

2010

 
 
68%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
81%

2011

 
 
79%

2010

 
 
77%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
76%

2011

 
 
81%

2010

 
 
74%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
49%

2012

 
 
78%

2011

 
 
80%

2010

 
 
80%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
48%

2012

 
 
70%

2011

 
 
76%

2010

 
 
76%
Science

The state average for Science was 79% in 2013.

2013

 
 
71%

2012

 
 
67%

2011

 
 
75%

2010

 
 
80%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 59% in 2013.

2013

 
 
41%

2012

 
 
80%

2011

 
 
77%

2010

 
 
83%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 60% in 2013.

2013

 
 
47%

2012

 
 
82%

2011

 
 
83%

2010

 
 
83%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students42%
Female42%
Male41%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic43%
Multiracial40%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White69%
Low income40%
Not low income52%
Students with disabilities (IEP)15%
Students without disabilities45%
English language learners15%

Reading

All Students51%
Female58%
Male44%
Black48%
Asiann/a
Hispanic55%
Multiracial60%
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White77%
Low income49%
Not low income71%
Students with disabilities (IEP)12%
Students without disabilities56%
English language learners23%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students54%
Female52%
Male56%
Black50%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income52%
Not low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)16%
Students without disabilities59%
English language learners8%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students46%
Female50%
Male43%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White85%
Low income43%
Not low income73%
Students with disabilities (IEP)11%
Students without disabilities51%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students73%
Female74%
Male72%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanic85%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White92%
Low income70%
Not low income91%
Students with disabilities (IEP)29%
Students without disabilities78%
English language learners33%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students42%
Female46%
Male38%
Black37%
Asian100%
Hispanic51%
Multiracial30%
Native Americann/a
White64%
Low income40%
Not low income55%
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities46%
English language learners10%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students44%
Female48%
Male40%
Black40%
Asian90%
Hispanic51%
Multiracial50%
Native Americann/a
White71%
Low income41%
Not low income66%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities49%
English language learners5%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students47%
Female49%
Male45%
Black40%
Asiann/a
Hispanic64%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities52%
English language learners14%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female52%
Male42%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
Whiten/a
Low income45%
Not low income67%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities52%
English language learners14%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students49%
Female55%
Male43%
Black42%
Asiann/a
Hispanic66%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White59%
Low income47%
Not low income60%
Students with disabilities (IEP)14%
Students without disabilities53%
English language learners13%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students48%
Female54%
Male43%
Black45%
Asiann/a
Hispanic56%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White65%
Low income47%
Not low income61%
Students with disabilities (IEP)13%
Students without disabilities53%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students71%
Female74%
Male68%
Black66%
Asiann/a
Hispanic83%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White82%
Low income70%
Not low income75%
Students with disabilities (IEP)38%
Students without disabilities75%
English language learners38%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students41%
Female41%
Male40%
Black33%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White60%
Low income38%
Not low income55%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities46%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students47%
Female53%
Male40%
Black41%
Asiann/a
Hispanic61%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islandern/a
White90%
Low income44%
Not low income62%
Students with disabilities (IEP)9%
Students without disabilities53%
English language learnersn/a
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to test students in grades 3 through 8 in reading and math, and in grades 4 and 7 in science. The ISAT is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

In 2013 the Illinois State Board of Education raised the performance expectations for the ISAT in reading and math. These expectations have been adjusted to better align with the Common Core State Standards, a multi-state initiative that established year-by-year guidelines outlining the grade-specific skills and content students need to stay on the path to college and career readiness. The higher expectations of the new standards will result in a downward shift of where students rank in meeting or exceeding standards.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

The state average for Math was 52% in 2013.

2013

 
 
26%

2012

 
 
21%

2011

 
 
24%

2010

 
 
27%
Reading

The state average for Reading was 55% in 2013.

2013

 
 
32%

2012

 
 
26%

2011

 
 
28%

2010

 
 
37%
Science

The state average for Science was 49% in 2013.

2013

 
 
23%

2012

 
 
23%

2011

 
 
18%

2010

 
 
27%
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Prairie State Achievement Examination (PSAE) to test students in grade 11 in reading, math and science. The PSAE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

Math

All Students26%
Female23%
Male30%
Black11%
Asian61%
Hispanic37%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White58%
Low income24%
Not low income35%
Students with disabilities (IEP)15%
Students without disabilities29%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a

Reading

All Students32%
Female31%
Male33%
Black23%
Asian43%
Hispanic43%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White49%
Low income29%
Not low income47%
Students with disabilities (IEP)15%
Students without disabilities36%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a

Science

All Students23%
Female19%
Male26%
Black7%
Asian57%
Hispanic35%
Multiracialn/a
Native Americann/a
White53%
Low income20%
Not low income33%
Students with disabilities (IEP)15%
Students without disabilities24%
English language learners0%
Migrantn/a
Scale: % meeting or exceeding standards

About the tests


In 2012-2013 Illinois used the Prairie State Achievement Examination (PSAE) to test students in grade 11 in reading, math and science. The PSAE is a standards-based test, which means it measures how well students are mastering specific skills defined for each grade by the state of Illinois. The goal is for all students to score at or above the state standard.

The different student groups are identified by the Illinois State Board of Education. If there are a small number of students in a particular group in a school, the state doesn't report data for that group.

Source: Illinois State Board of Education

What is the GreatSchools Rating?

The GreatSchools rating is a simple tool for parents to compare schools based on test scores, student academic growth, and college readiness. It compares schools across the state, where the highest rated schools in the state are designated as “Above Average” and the lowest “Below Average.” It is designed to be a starting point to help parents make baseline comparisons. We always advise parents to visit the school and consider other information on school performance and programs, as well as consider their child's and family's needs as part of the school selection process.

 
Below average

Test score rating
Student growth rating
College readiness rating

1-3 Below Average

4-7 Average

8-10 Above Average

 

How schools in the state rate:

26%
of schools in the state are Below average
46%
of schools in the state are Average
28%
of schools in the state are Above average

Breaking down the GreatSchools Rating

The graphs below compare this school's results in each area to other schools in the district and state.

Test score rating 20131What's this?

Test score rating examines how students at this school performed on standardized tests compared with other schools in the state.

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District
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Student growth rating 20132What's this?

Student growth rating measures whether students at this school are making academic progress over time. Specifically, the rating looks at how much progress individual students have made on reading and math assessments during the past year or more.

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District
State
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10

Math growth at this school

Below Average

Reading growth at this school

Below Average


College readiness rating 20133What's this?

College readiness rating combines this high school's graduation rates with data about college entrance exams, both of which are indicators of how well schools are preparing students for success in college and beyond.

Close
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District
State
1
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5
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8
9
10

Average ACT score

17

Graduation rate

83.6%


1 Test scores are based on 2012-13 ISAT results from the state of Illinois.

2 This rating is based on 2012-13 value table growth scores from the state of Illinois.

3 This rating is based on composite ACT scores and four-year adjusted graduation rates from 2012-13.

Student ethnicity

Ethnicity This school State average
Black 70% 18%
Hispanic 24% 24%
White 3% 51%
Asian or Asian/Pacific Islander 2% 4%
Two or more races 1% 3%
American Indian/Alaska Native 0% 0%
Hawaiian Native/Pacific Islander 0% 0%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Student subgroups

  This school District averageState average
Female 51%N/A49%
Male 49%N/A51%
Source: NCES, 2011-2012

Teacher resources

Special staff resources available to students Assistant principal(s)
Art teacher(s)
College counselor(s)
Computer specialist(s)
Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
ELL/ESL Coordinator
Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
Librarian/media specialist(s)
Math specialist(s)
Music teacher(s)
PE instructor(s)
Nurse(s)
Reading specialist(s)
Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
Security personnel
Special education coordinator
Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by school staff Spanish
Read more about programs at this school
Source: Provided by a school official.

Special education / special needs

Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Extra learning resources offered
  • Differentiated learning programs
Staff resources available to students
  • Special education coordinator

Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math (STEM)

Staff resources available to students
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
School facilities
  • Computer lab
Clubs
  • Science club
  • Technology club

Arts & music

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing and written arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production
Clubs
  • Dance club
  • Drama club
  • Yearbook

Language learning

Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Staff resources available to students
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish

Health & athletics

Staff resources available to students
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Gym
Clubs
  • Cooking club
  • Girls on the run
  • SADD
  • Yoga club

Gifted & talented

College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Clubs
  • National Honor Society
School leaders can update this information here.

School basics

School start time
  • 7:45 am
School end time
  • 3:30 pm
Before school or after school care / program onsite
  • Before school: starts at 7:00 a.m.
  • After school: ends at 6:00 a.m.
School Leader's name
  • Beth Purvis
Best ways for parents to contact the school
  • Phone
Gender
  • Coed
Special schedule
  • Extended/longer school day
Is there an application process?
  • Yes
Fax number
  • (312) 651-5001

Programs

Instructional and/or curriculum models used

Don't understand these terms?
  • College prep
  • Core knowledge
  • Internships
Specific academic themes or areas of focus

Don't understand these terms?
  • None
Bi-lingual or language immersion programs offered

Don't understand these terms?
  • No
Level of special education programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Foreign languages taught
  • French
  • Spanish
Level of ESL/ELL programming offered
  • Basic - the school offers or partners to provide services based on the needs of individual students
Vocational or skills-based training offered
  • None

Resources

Staff resources available to students
  • Art teacher(s)
  • Assistant principal(s)
  • College counselor(s)
  • Computer specialist(s)
  • Cooking/Nutrition teacher(s)
  • ELL/ESL Coordinator
  • Instructional aide(s)/coach(es)
  • Librarian/media specialist(s)
  • Math specialist(s)
  • Music teacher(s)
  • Nurse(s)
  • PE instructor(s)
  • Reading specialist(s)
  • Robotics/Technology specialist(s)
  • Security personnel
  • Special education coordinator
  • Teacher aid/assistant teacher
Foreign languages spoken by staff
  • Spanish
Extra learning resources offered
  • Career/college counseling
  • Counseling
  • Differentiated learning programs
  • Mentoring
  • Remediation
  • Tutoring
College preparation / awareness resources offered
  • College prep programs/courses during the year
  • College presentations or information sessions
  • School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Transportation options
  • bus - CICS Jackson only
School facilities
  • Access to sports fields
  • Auditorium
  • Cafeteria
  • Computer lab
  • Gym
  • Library
  • Playground
School leaders can update this information here.

Sports

Boys sports
  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Football
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball
Girls sports
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross country
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Track
  • Volleyball

Arts & music

Visual arts
  • Drawing / sketching
  • Painting
Music
  • Band
  • Choir / Chorus
Performing arts
  • Dance
  • Drama
Media arts
  • Video / Film production

Student clubs

Clubs (distinct from courses)
  • Cooking club
  • Dance club
  • Drama club
  • Girls on the run
  • Homework help/study buddy club
  • Model UN
  • National Honor Society
  • SADD
  • Science club
  • Student council/government
  • Technology club
  • Yearbook
  • Yoga club
School leaders can update this information here.

Upcoming Events

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School culture

Dress Code
  • Uniforms
Bullying policy
  • This school has a bullying and/or cyber bullying policy in place.
Parent involvement
  • Attend parent nights
  • Chaperone school trips
  • Join PTO/PTA
  • Organize fundraising events (school auction, bake sales, etc.)
  • Volunteer in the classroom
  • Volunteer time after school
School leaders can update this information here.

Apply

 

TIP: Don't forget to ask about documents required for enrollment, such as your child's birth certificate, proof of address, or a record of immunizations.

 
Apply now
 

Planning ahead

College preparation / awareness offered
College prep programs/courses during the year
College presentations or information sessions
School-sponsored trips to college campuses
Notice an inaccuracy? Let us know!

11 E Adams St Ste 600
Chicago, IL 60603
Website: Click here
Phone: (312) 651-5000

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